2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

21 - 30 of 115 results for: HISTORY ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

HISTORY 79C: The Ethical Challenges of Climate Change (HISTORY 179C)

This course explores the ethical challenges of climate change from historical, social, economic, political, cultural and scientific perspectives. These include the discovery of global warming over two centuries, the rise of secular and religious denialism and skepticism toward the scientific consensus on it, the dispute between developed and developing countries over how to forge a binding global agreement to mitigate it, and the "role morality" of various actors (scientists, politicians, fossil fuel companies, the media and ordinary individuals) in the US in assessing ethical responsibility for the problem and its solutions.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Wolfe, M. (PI)

HISTORY 85Q: Humanities Core: Middle East II -- Classic (COMPLIT 32Q, DLCL 32Q, HUMCORE 32Q)

How should we live? This course explores two ethical pathways: mysticism and rationality. They seem to be opposites, but as we'll see, some important historical figures managed to follow both at once. We will read works by successful judges, bureaucrats, academics, and lovers written between 700 and 1900 C.E. We will ask ourselves whether we agree with their choices and judgments about professional success and politics. What would we do differently today? We certainly organize knowledge differently, but do we think about ethics the same way? N.B. This is the second of three courses in the Middle Eastern track. These courses offer an unparalleled opportunity to study Middle Eastern history and culture, past and present. Take all three to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to exploring how ideas have shaped our world and future.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 101: The Greeks (CLASSICS 83)

250 years ago, for almost the first time in history, a few societies rejected kings who claimed to know what the gods wanted and began moving toward democracy. Only once before had this happened--in ancient Greece. This course asks how the Greeks did this, and what they can teach us today. It uses texts and archaeology to trace the material and military sides of the story as well as cultural developments, and looks at Greek slavery and misogyny as well as their achievements. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 104D: International Security in a Changing World (INTLPOL 241, POLISCI 114S)

(Formerly IPS 241) This class examines the most pressing international security problems facing the world today: nuclear crises, nuclear non-proliferation, digital security, terrorism, and climate change. Alternative perspectives--from political science, history, and STS (Science, Technology, and Society) studies--are used to analyze these problems. The class includes an award-winning two-day international negotiation simulation.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 106B: Global Human Geography: Europe and Americas

Patterns of demography, economic and social development, geopolitics, and cultural differentiation. Use of maps to depict geographical patterns and processes.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 107: Introduction to Urban Studies (URBANST 110)

Today, for the first time in history, a majority of people live in cities. By 2050, cities will hold two-thirds of the world¿s population. This transformation touches everyone, and raises critical questions. What draws people to live in cities? How will urban growth affect the world¿s environment? Why are cities so divided by race and by class, and what can be done about it? How do cities change who we are, and how can we change cities? In this class, you will learn to see cities in new ways, from the smallest everyday interactions on a city sidewalk to the largest patterns of global migration and trade. We will use specific examples from cities around the world to illustrate the concepts that we learn in class. The course is intended primarily for freshmen and sophomores.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 120A: The Russian Empire, 1450-1800

(Same as HISTORY 20A. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 120A.) Explores rise of Russian state and expanse of empire; patterns of governance of a Eurasian empire; strategies and institutions of governance; survey of various ethnic and religious groups in empire and their varied cultures and political economies; gender and family; serfdom; Russian Orthodox religion and culture; reforms and Europeanization of 18th century.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kollmann, N. (PI)

HISTORY 137D: Germany's Wars and the World, 1848-2010 (HISTORY 37D)

This course examines a series of explosive encounters between Germans, Europe, and the world. Starting with the overlooked revolutions of 1848 and ending with the reunification of West Germany and East Germany after the Cold War, the course will explore a range of topics: capitalism, communism, imperialism, nationalism, diplomacy, antisemitism, gender, race, and the Holocaust, among others. We will also consider competing visions of Germany its borders, its members, its enemies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Press, S. (PI)

HISTORY 138G: Europe and Its Great Migrations: The Modern Period (HISTORY 38G)

From the "Germanic" people's migrations of antiquity to the global refugee crises of today, migration has left an indelible mark on European society. What are the causes and consequences of periods of "mass" migration? Surveying major episodes in recent European migration history, we will explore how human mobility has historically shaped culture, politics, economics, and society on this continent. Special attention will be given to the 19th century, an exceptional chapter in global migration history that saw some 55 million Europeans departing for the Americas.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hein, B. (PI)

HISTORY 140: World History of Science

(Same as HISTORY 40. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 140.) The earliest developments in science, the prehistoric roots of technology, the scientific revolution, and global voyaging. Theories of human origins and the oldest known tools and symbols. Achievements of the Mayans, Aztecs, and native N. Americans. Science and medicine in ancient Greece, Egypt, China, Africa, and India. Science in medieval and Renaissance Europe and the Islamic world including changing cosmologies and natural histories. Theories of scientific growth and decay; how science engages other factors such as material culture and religions.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Proctor, R. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints