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1 - 10 of 94 results for: HISTORY ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

HISTORY 1A: Global History: The Ancient World (CLASSICS 76)

World history from the origins of humanity to the Black Death. Focuses on the evolution of complex societies, wealth, violence, and hierarchy, emphasizing the three great turning points in early history: the evolution of modern humans, the agricultural revolution, and the rise of the state.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 3A: Making Palestine Visible (COMPLIT 42, CSRE 3A)

The course will discuss topics that inform the debate over Israel-Palestine. We will address common misperceptions, key themes, concepts, and issues and present information aimed at helping students understand the complex history and array of contemporary political, cultural and legal structures at play and how they tend to render Palestinian claims to rights illegible for much of the American public. This learning experience, incorporating discussion and clarification at its core, connects with the national and Stanford campus discussion of activism on Israel-Palestine.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

HISTORY 5S: Comparative Partitions: Pakistan, Israel, and the Modern World (FEMGEN 5S)

Modern maps of the world simplify history by portraying the partitioning of territory as adding another border to a map, a naturalized action in the histories of sovereignty. The partitions of India and Palestine in 1947 and 1948 involved division of territory, but were also influenced by international commitments to secure representation for religious minorities. This course focuses on the key global discussions deployed by Indian Muslims and European Jews to understand the nature of their demands for a nation and determine the historical situations that resulted in the creation of sovereign nations. These partitions demonstrate how events, people, geographies, histories and ideas are powerfully linked on a global scale.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Akhter, M. (PI)

HISTORY 8W: Human Trafficking Service Learning

Continuation of service learning. Only for students who completed HISTORY 6W/7W. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 11N: The Roman Empire: Its Grandeur and Fall (CLASSICS 26N)

(Formerly CLASSHIS 24N.) Preference to freshmen. Explore themes on the Roman Empire and its decline from the 1st through the 5th centuries C.E.. What was the political and military glue that held this diverse, multi-ethnic empire together? What were the bases of wealth and how was it distributed? What were the possibilities and limits of economic growth? How integrated was it in culture and religion? What were the causes and consequences of the conversion to Christianity? Why did the Empire fall in the West? How suitable is the analogy of the U.S. in the 21st century?
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:IHUM-3, WAY-SI
Instructors: Saller, R. (PI)

HISTORY 15D: The Civilization and Culture of the Middle Ages (HISTORY 115D, RELIGST 115X)

This course provides an introduction to Medieval Europe from the fall of Rome to the Renaissance. While the framework of the course is chronological, we¿ll concentrate particularly on the structure of medieval society. Rural and urban life, kingship and papal government, wars and plagues provide the context for our examination of the lives of medieval people, what they believed, and how they interacted with other, both within Christendom and beyond it.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 30A: In Sickness and In Health: Medicine and Society in the United States: 1800-Present (AMSTUD 130A, HISTORY 130A)

Explores the history of medical institutions, ideas and practices in the United States from the early nineteenth century to the present. How are ideas of illness and health historically rooted and socially constructed? How did scientific and medical discoveries lead to the rise of scientific medicine, and how were these innovations adopted within the American cultural landscape? Topics include the transformation of therapeutics and technologies, medicine and the scientific ideal in the U.S., gender and race and medicine, the history of public health, and the professionalization and specialization of American medical practice.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Horn, M. (PI)

HISTORY 32S: Medicine and Society: The Rise of Expertise in Early Modern Europe

How did medicine emerge as a distinctive body of knowledge? Why did physicians, rather than other medical practitioners, come to dominate medicine? What was the role of women in medicine? How did law and medicine, two areas that have so many points of intersection in today¿s world, interact in early modern society? This course investigates the history of medicine in Renaissance and early modern Europe. With its emphasis on primary sources, the course provides an introduction to medical and legal historical research. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Roever, J. (PI)

HISTORY 40A: The Scientific Revolution

(Same as History 140A. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for History 140A.) What do people know and how do they know it? What counts as scientific knowledge? In the 16th and 17th centuries, understanding the nature of knowledge engaged the attention of individuals and institutions including Copernicus, Galileo, Descartes, Newton, the early Royal Society, and less well-known contemporaries. New meanings of observing, collecting, experimenting, and philosophizing, and political, religious, and cultural ramifications in early modern Europe.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Riskin, J. (PI)

HISTORY 41Q: Madwomen: The History of Women and Mental Illness in the U.S.

Explores how gender and historical context have shaped the experience and treatment of mental illness in U.S. history. Why have women been the witches and hysterics of the past, and why have there historically been more women than men among the mentally ill? Topics include the relationship between historical ideas of femininity and insanity, the ways that notions of gender influence the definition and treatment of mental disorder, and the understanding of the historically embedded nature of medical ideas, diagnoses, and treatments.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Horn, M. (PI)
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