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1 - 10 of 95 results for: HISTORY ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

HISTORY 1A: Global History: The Ancient World (CLASSICS 76)

World history from the origins of humanity to the Black Death. Focuses on the evolution of complex societies, wealth, violence, and hierarchy, emphasizing the three great turning points in early history: the evolution of modern humans, the agricultural revolution, and the rise of the state.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 5C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (CSRE 5C, EMED 5C, FEMGEN 5C, HUMBIO 178T)

(Same as History 105C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution and labor exploitation, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 5W: Human Trafficking Service Learning

Continuation of service learning for students who completed History 105C.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 6S: Wealth, Empire, and the Making of the Modern Economy, 1800 to Present

What is the history behind our modern economy? What counts as national wealth, and who decides? More than a measure of GDP, the modern economy is the product of some of history's most divisive social, political, and cultural struggles. This seminar surveys two hundred years of European and often global history in order to explore the historical relationships among wealth, empire, the nation-state and statistics, Big Data, and the modern economy. As an introduction to the methods of historical analysis and historical perspective, this seminar focuses on the use of primary sources. Sources include the writings of crucial thinkers from Adam Smith to Karl Polanyi; novels and literature from the 19th century; press materials and political speeches; historical maps; private letters; art and architecture; as well as digital sources such as radio and film. Students from all majors are encouraged to enroll. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Hein, B. (PI)

HISTORY 6W: Service-Learning Workshop on Human Trafficking Part I (FEMGEN 6W)

Two-quarter service-learning workshop to accompany course, "Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives." Considers purpose and practice of service learning. Provides training for students' work in community. Examines current scope of human trafficking in Bay Area, pressing concerns, capacity and obstacles to effectively address them. Students work with community partners dedicated to confronting human trafficking and problems it entails on a daily basis.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 10C: The Problem of Modern Europe

(SAME as HISTORY 110C. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 110C.) From the late 18th century to the present. How Europeans responded to rapid social changes caused by political upheaval, industrialization, and modernization. How the experience and legacy of imperialism and colonialism both influenced European society and put in motion a process of globalization that continues to shape international politics today.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Daughton, J. (PI)

HISTORY 11N: The Roman Empire: Its Grandeur and Fall (CLASSICS 26N)

(Formerly CLASSHIS 24N.) Preference to freshmen. Explore themes on the Roman Empire and its decline from the 1st through the 5th centuries C.E.. What was the political and military glue that held this diverse, multi-ethnic empire together? What were the bases of wealth and how was it distributed? What were the possibilities and limits of economic growth? How integrated was it in culture and religion? What were the causes and consequences of the conversion to Christianity? Why did the Empire fall in the West? How suitable is the analogy of the U.S. in the 21st century?
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:IHUM-3, WAY-SI
Instructors: Saller, R. (PI)

HISTORY 15D: The Civilization and Culture of the Middle Ages (HISTORY 115D, RELIGST 115X)

This course provides an introduction to Medieval Europe from the fall of Rome to the Renaissance. While the framework of the course is chronological, we¿ll concentrate particularly on the structure of medieval society. Rural and urban life, kingship and papal government, wars and plagues provide the context for our examination of the lives of medieval people, what they believed, and how they interacted with other, both within Christendom and beyond it.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 40A: The Scientific Revolution

(Same as History 140A. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for History 140A.) What do people know and how do they know it? What counts as scientific knowledge? In the 16th and 17th centuries, understanding the nature of knowledge engaged the attention of individuals and institutions including Copernicus, Galileo, Descartes, Newton, the early Royal Society, and less well-known contemporaries. New meanings of observing, collecting, experimenting, and philosophizing, and political, religious, and cultural ramifications in early modern Europe.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Riskin, J. (PI)

HISTORY 47: History of South Africa (AFRICAAM 47)

(Same as HISTORY 147. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 147.) Introduction, focusing particularly on the modern era. Topics include: precolonial African societies; European colonization; the impact of the mineral revolution; the evolution of African and Afrikaner nationalism; the rise and fall of the apartheid state; the politics of post-apartheid transformation; and the AIDS crisis.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Campbell, J. (PI)
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