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491 - 500 of 540 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 391K: Korean History and Culture before 1900 (HISTORY 291K, KOREA 158, KOREA 258)

This course serves as an introduction to Korean culture, society, and history before the modern period. It begins with a discussion of early Korea and controversies over Korean origins; the bulk of the course will be devoted to the Chos'n period (1392-1910), that from the end of medieval Korea to the modern period. Topics to be covered include: Korean national and ethnic origins, the role of religious and intellectual traditions such as Buddhism and Confucianism, popular and indigenous religious practices, the traditional Korean family and social order, state and society during the Chos'n dynasty, vernacular prose literature, Korean's relations with its neighbors in East Asia, and changing conceptions of Korean identity.nThe course will be conducted through the reading and discussion of primary texts in English translation alongside scholarly research. As such, it will emphasize the interpretation of historical sources, which include personal letters, memoirs, and diaries, traditional more »
This course serves as an introduction to Korean culture, society, and history before the modern period. It begins with a discussion of early Korea and controversies over Korean origins; the bulk of the course will be devoted to the Chos'n period (1392-1910), that from the end of medieval Korea to the modern period. Topics to be covered include: Korean national and ethnic origins, the role of religious and intellectual traditions such as Buddhism and Confucianism, popular and indigenous religious practices, the traditional Korean family and social order, state and society during the Chos'n dynasty, vernacular prose literature, Korean's relations with its neighbors in East Asia, and changing conceptions of Korean identity.nThe course will be conducted through the reading and discussion of primary texts in English translation alongside scholarly research. As such, it will emphasize the interpretation of historical sources, which include personal letters, memoirs, and diaries, traditional histories, diplomatic and political documents, along with religious texts and works of art. Scholarly work will help contextualize these materials, while the class discussions will introduce students to existing scholarly debates about the Korean past. Students will be asked also to examine the premodern past with an eye to contemporary reception. The final project for the class is a film study, where a modern Korean film portraying premodern Korea will be analyzed as a case study of how the past works in public historical memory in contemporary Korea, both North and South. An open-ended research paper is also possible, pending instructor approval.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | Repeatable for credit

HISTORY 392E: The Historical Roots of Modern East Asia (HISTORY 92A)

Focus is on China and Japan before and during their transition to modernity. The populous, urbanized, economically advanced, and culturally sophisticated Ming empire and Muromachi shogunate in the 16th century when Europeans first arrived. How the status quo had turned on its head by the early 20th century when European and American steamships dominated the Pacific, China was in social and political upheaval, and Japan had begun its march to empire.
Last offered: Winter 2008

HISTORY 392F: Culture and Religions in Korean History (HISTORY 292F)

This colloquium explores the major themes of Korean history before 1800 and the role of culture and religions in shaping the everyday life of Chosôn-dynasty Koreans. Themes include the aristocracy and military in the Koryô dynasty, Buddhism and Confucianism in the making of Chosôn Korea, kingship and court culture, slavery and women, family and rituals, death and punishment, and the Korean alphabet (Hangûl) and print culture.
Last offered: Spring 2015

HISTORY 393: Frontier Expansion and Ethnic Statecraft in the Qing Empire (CHINA 393)

The legacy of the Qing dynasty in the territorial boundaries claimed by the People's Republic of China including the frontier zones that lie outside China proper. How the Qing acquired and ruled its frontier territories. Growth and migration of the Han Chinese population. How the dynasty's Manchu rulers managed ethnic difference. Consequences of Qing expansionism and ethnic statecraft for subject peoples and for the dynasty itself. At what point and by what processes did the Qing become China.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Sommer, M. (PI)

HISTORY 394D: Manchuria: Cradle of Conflict, Cockpit of Asia (HISTORY 294D)

How did Manchuria become Chinese? This course utilizes the dual waves of early twentieth-century writings and a wide array of recent scholarship dealing with Manchuria to explore the formation of nation-states out of the Qing and Japanese empires in Northeast Asia through the lenses of opium, migration, cities, warlords, and memoir. This course will be of interest to students concerned with developing transcultural understandings of Northeast Asian history.
Last offered: Winter 2015

HISTORY 394E: The Past in Ancient China (HISTORY 294E)

Introduction to the most important sources in the early Chinese historiographical tradition (broadly conceived), examining how the past was mobilized across a range of textual genres including poetry, speeches, philosophy, narrative, and rhetoric. Prior knowledge of premodern Chinese history and culture is not required. All reading materials will be in English; no knowledge of modern or classical Chinese is expected.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Waring, L. (PI)

HISTORY 395B: Readings in Early Modern Japanese History

Terms: Win | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Wigen, K. (PI)

HISTORY 395J: Gender and Sexuality in Chinese History (CHINA 395, FEMGEN 395J)

Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Sommer, M. (PI)

HISTORY 397: The Cold War and East Asia (HISTORY 297)

Explores how East Asia negotiated superpower rivalry and global ideological competition during the Cold War. Considers the ways in which China, Japan, and Korea were more than battlegrounds for US-Soviet contestation and played active roles in defining the nature and dynamics of the conflict. Re-examines conventional narratives and periodizations against alternative conceptual models and interpretive frameworks highlighting the constructed nature of the struggle as well as the role of historical and cultural factors in shaping the East Asian experience.
Last offered: Spring 2014

HISTORY 399E: Preparing for International Field Research: Public Svc or Research, Electronic Version

Restricted to students studying at a Stanford Overseas Studies campus; same course content as HISTORY 299X. Problems involved in research abroad: ethical issues; safety; security and conduct; human subjects protocol. Methodologies of research: interviewing, networking, case studies, participant observation, large surveys. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Last offered: Spring 2012
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