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391 - 400 of 540 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 324C: Genocide and Humanitarian Intervention (HISTORY 224C, JEWISHST 284C, JEWISHST 384C, PEDS 224)

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Traces the history of genocide in the 20th century and the question of humanitarian intervention to stop it, a topic that has been especially controversial since the end of the Cold War. The pre-1990s discussion begins with the Armenian genocide during the First World War and includes the Holocaust and Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s. Coverage of genocide and humanitarian intervention since the 1990s includes the wars in Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, the Congo and Sudan.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

HISTORY 324F: The Caucasus and the Muslim World

The linkages connecting the societies of the Caucasus to Muslim communities in Iran, Russia, the Ottoman Empire and Turkey, S. Asia, and the Middle East.
Last offered: Spring 2009

HISTORY 325E: From Vladimir to Putin: Key Themes in Russian History (HISTORY 225E, REES 225E)

Formative issues in Russian history from Muscovy to the present: autocracy and totalitarianism; tsars, emperors, and party secretaries; multi-ethnicity and nationalism; serfdom, peasantry; rebellions and revolutions, dissent and opposition; law and legality; public and private spheres; religion and atheism; patterns of collapse. Class format will be discussion of one to two assigned books or major articles per class.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5

HISTORY 326A: Modern Europe: Society and Politics

The goal of this course is to introduce graduate students to major works of history and literature in the field of nineteenth and early-twentieth century history. A colloquia will be given in tandem with a research seminar.
Last offered: Winter 2014

HISTORY 326C: Graduate Colloquium on Balkan History

Designed for History Ph.D. students to develop competence in the history and historiography of the modern Balkans, from the French Revolution to the present. Areas of study include the influence of empires on the region, the rise of nationalism and nation states, the dilemmas of independence, the emergence and decline of communism in the region, and the recurrence of war and ethnic conflict.
Last offered: Autumn 2009

HISTORY 326D: The Holocaust: Insights from New Research (CSRE 226D, CSRE 326D, HISTORY 226D, JEWISHST 226E, JEWISHST 326D)

Overview of the history of the Holocaust, the genocide of European Jews. Explores its causes, course, consequences, and memory. Addresses the events themselves, as well as the roles of perpetrators and bystanders, dilemmas faced by victims, collaboration of local populations, and the issue of rescue. Considers how the Holocaust was and is remembered and commemorated by victims and participants alike. Uses different kinds of sources: scholarly work, memoirs, diaries, film, and primary documents.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5

HISTORY 326E: Famine in the Modern World (HISTORY 226E, PEDS 226)

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Examines the major famines of modern history, the controversies surrounding them, and the reasons that famine persists in our increasingly globalized world. Focus is on the relative importance of natural, economic, and political factors as causes of famine in the modern world. Case studies include the Great Irish Famine of the 1840s; the Bengal famine of 1943-44; the Soviet famines of 1921-22 and 1932-33; China's Great Famine of 1959-61; the Ethiopian famines of the 1970s and 80s, and the Somalia famines of the 1990s and of 2011.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

HISTORY 327D: All Quiet on the Eastern Front? East Europe and Russia in the First World War (HISTORY 227D, REES 227, REES 327)

Until recently history has been comparatively quiet about the experience of World War I in the east. Far from being a peripheral theater of war, however, the experiences of war on the Eastern Front were central to shaping the 20th century. Not only was the first shot of the war fired in the east, it was also the site of the most dramatic political revolution. Using scholarly texts, literature and film, this course combines political, military, cultural and social approaches to introduce the causes, conduct and consequences of World War I with a focus on the experiences of soldiers and civilians on the Eastern Front. Topics include: the war of movement, occupation, extreme violence against civilians, the Armenian genocide, population exchanges, the Russian Revolution and civil war, and the disintegration of empires and rise of nation-states.
Last offered: Winter 2018

HISTORY 328: Circles of Hell: Poland in World War II (HISTORY 228, JEWISHST 282, JEWISHST 382)

Looks at the experience and representation of Poland's wartime history from the Nazi-Soviet Pact (1939) to the aftermath of Yalta (1945). Examines Nazi and Soviet ideology and practice in Poland, as well as the ways Poles responded, resisted, and survived. Considers wartime relations among Polish citizens, particularly Poles and Jews. In this regard, interrogates the traditional self-characterization of Poles as innocent victims, looking at their relationship to the Holocaust, thus engaging in a passionate debate still raging in Polish society.
Last offered: Spring 2015

HISTORY 330: Core Colloquium on Early Modern Europe: Ancien Regime

Topics in the social, political, and religious history of Western Europe, 1550-1789, with an emphasis on France. May be repeated for credit.
Last offered: Spring 2009 | Repeatable for credit
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