2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

321 - 330 of 540 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 288D: American Jewish History: Learning to be Jewish in America (AMSTUD 279X, EDUC 279, JEWISHST 297X, RELIGST 279X)

This course will be a seminar in American Jewish History through the lens of education. It will address both the relationship between Jews and American educational systems, as well as the history of Jewish education in America. Plotting the course along these two axes will provide a productive matrix for a focused examination of the American Jewish experience. History students must take course for at least 3 units.
Last offered: Winter 2015

HISTORY 291K: Korean History and Culture before 1900 (HISTORY 391K, KOREA 158, KOREA 258)

This course serves as an introduction to Korean culture, society, and history before the modern period. It begins with a discussion of early Korea and controversies over Korean origins; the bulk of the course will be devoted to the Chos'n period (1392-1910), that from the end of medieval Korea to the modern period. Topics to be covered include: Korean national and ethnic origins, the role of religious and intellectual traditions such as Buddhism and Confucianism, popular and indigenous religious practices, the traditional Korean family and social order, state and society during the Chos'n dynasty, vernacular prose literature, Korean's relations with its neighbors in East Asia, and changing conceptions of Korean identity.nThe course will be conducted through the reading and discussion of primary texts in English translation alongside scholarly research. As such, it will emphasize the interpretation of historical sources, which include personal letters, memoirs, and diaries, traditional more »
This course serves as an introduction to Korean culture, society, and history before the modern period. It begins with a discussion of early Korea and controversies over Korean origins; the bulk of the course will be devoted to the Chos'n period (1392-1910), that from the end of medieval Korea to the modern period. Topics to be covered include: Korean national and ethnic origins, the role of religious and intellectual traditions such as Buddhism and Confucianism, popular and indigenous religious practices, the traditional Korean family and social order, state and society during the Chos'n dynasty, vernacular prose literature, Korean's relations with its neighbors in East Asia, and changing conceptions of Korean identity.nThe course will be conducted through the reading and discussion of primary texts in English translation alongside scholarly research. As such, it will emphasize the interpretation of historical sources, which include personal letters, memoirs, and diaries, traditional histories, diplomatic and political documents, along with religious texts and works of art. Scholarly work will help contextualize these materials, while the class discussions will introduce students to existing scholarly debates about the Korean past. Students will be asked also to examine the premodern past with an eye to contemporary reception. The final project for the class is a film study, where a modern Korean film portraying premodern Korea will be analyzed as a case study of how the past works in public historical memory in contemporary Korea, both North and South. An open-ended research paper is also possible, pending instructor approval.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit

HISTORY 292F: Culture and Religions in Korean History (HISTORY 392F)

This colloquium explores the major themes of Korean history before 1800 and the role of culture and religions in shaping the everyday life of Chosôn-dynasty Koreans. Themes include the aristocracy and military in the Koryô dynasty, Buddhism and Confucianism in the making of Chosôn Korea, kingship and court culture, slavery and women, family and rituals, death and punishment, and the Korean alphabet (Hangûl) and print culture.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 293C: Stateless in South Asia

Taking statelessness as more than a political condition, this course reviews the myriad aspects of statelessness. Exploring a few critical moments in modern South Asia (1945-2010), this seminar thematically follows the historical construction of statelessness in some of the most conflict-ridden theatres of world politics. This course explores the following questions: Is statelessness always a result of national and nationalist exclusion? What are the ways in which statelessness has amplified the gaps in the coherent rationale of national belonging?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 294D: Manchuria: Cradle of Conflict, Cockpit of Asia (HISTORY 394D)

How did Manchuria become Chinese? This course utilizes the dual waves of early twentieth-century writings and a wide array of recent scholarship dealing with Manchuria to explore the formation of nation-states out of the Qing and Japanese empires in Northeast Asia through the lenses of opium, migration, cities, warlords, and memoir. This course will be of interest to students concerned with developing transcultural understandings of Northeast Asian history.
Last offered: Winter 2015

HISTORY 294E: The Past in Ancient China (HISTORY 394E)

Introduction to the most important sources in the early Chinese historiographical tradition (broadly conceived), examining how the past was mobilized across a range of textual genres including poetry, speeches, philosophy, narrative, and rhetoric. Prior knowledge of premodern Chinese history and culture is not required. All reading materials will be in English; no knowledge of modern or classical Chinese is expected.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Waring, L. (PI)

HISTORY 294J: Science, Power, and Knowledge: East Asia to 1900 (CHINA 157, CHINA 257, JAPAN 157, JAPAN 257, KOREA 157, KOREA 257)

In the early modern period, East Asian societies featured long-established institutions of learning and traditions of knowledge. This course examines the relationship between knowledge and power in East Asia societies prior to 1900. It explores how knowledge production operated in late imperial China (1550-1900), Chos'n Korea (1392-1910), and Tokugawa Japan (1600-1868). Among the themes addressed are: the state's role in patronizing science and knowledge; major intellectual movements; engagement with Western science and religion; East Asian statecraft; and East Asian understandings of space and geography. nTaking a holistic perspective, it places science and technology in 1) a social and cultural context 2) in relation to other bodies and fields of knowledge 3) in comparison to other societies in a similar historical time period. A socially embedded perspective on knowledge and science seeks to appreciate how politics, society, and knowledge are integrated, and in particular how scienc more »
In the early modern period, East Asian societies featured long-established institutions of learning and traditions of knowledge. This course examines the relationship between knowledge and power in East Asia societies prior to 1900. It explores how knowledge production operated in late imperial China (1550-1900), Chos'n Korea (1392-1910), and Tokugawa Japan (1600-1868). Among the themes addressed are: the state's role in patronizing science and knowledge; major intellectual movements; engagement with Western science and religion; East Asian statecraft; and East Asian understandings of space and geography. nTaking a holistic perspective, it places science and technology in 1) a social and cultural context 2) in relation to other bodies and fields of knowledge 3) in comparison to other societies in a similar historical time period. A socially embedded perspective on knowledge and science seeks to appreciate how politics, society, and knowledge are integrated, and in particular how science and knowledge can be both instruments and sites of political power. By exploring these links, the course will also illustrate how our modern disciplinary categories of natural science,social science and the humanities cannot be taken for granted and the areas of knowledge they cover can be deeply intertwined. nnThe course will also address these issues historically and across geographic regions in East Asia and beyond. The comparative lens and frameworks these perspectives can offer will bring an awareness of the diverse traditions of knowledge production in East Asia. Its examination of East Asian encounters with Western paradigms of knowledge throughout the early modern period will also illustrate how communication occurs across cultural, social, and linguistic barriers and how diverse world-views were managed in these encounters. These encounters of knowledge-exchange between Jesuit missionaries, Ming literati, Korean aristocrats, and Japanese doctors also show how cultural identities were constructed, reinforced, and challenged. These identities, expressed through the mastery of knowledge, are essential for understanding how East Asian reckoned with growing pressures to adopt Western industrial technology and military science in the late nineteenth century.

HISTORY 296: Communism and Revolution in China

From the formation of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) in 1921 through the 1949 founding of the People's Republic of China (PRC). Topics include: early theories of socialism in China; the relationship between Chinese communism and the Communist International and Soviet Union; agrarian reformulation of communism by Mao; the communist-nationalist civil war; the Communist Revolution of 1949; and the consolidation of communist power in the PRC.
Last offered: Spring 2009 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

HISTORY 296E: Modern South Asia, 1500- Present

This course examines the major political, social, religious, and cultural developments within early modern, colonial, and postcolonial South Asia. Topics include religious reform, the role of women, anticolonialism, and national formation. Students will be introduced to critical writings on the emergence of modernity on the Indian subcontinent.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Akhter, M. (PI)

HISTORY 297: The Cold War and East Asia (HISTORY 397)

Explores how East Asia negotiated superpower rivalry and global ideological competition during the Cold War. Considers the ways in which China, Japan, and Korea were more than battlegrounds for US-Soviet contestation and played active roles in defining the nature and dynamics of the conflict. Re-examines conventional narratives and periodizations against alternative conceptual models and interpretive frameworks highlighting the constructed nature of the struggle as well as the role of historical and cultural factors in shaping the East Asian experience.
Last offered: Spring 2014
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints