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301 - 310 of 539 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 270F: History of the Police in the United States

How did police come to have the power to use violence? Who counts as a police officer and why? Topics include: growth of professional policing, creation of private police forces and vigilantism, slave patrols, political economy of policing, global policing, and cultural depictions of police. The entanglement of race, class, gender, and state power with police work is central.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Adams, B. (PI)

HISTORY 271: Mexicans in the United States (AMSTUD 271, CHILATST 171, CSRE 171H)

This course explores the lives and experiences of Mexicans living in the United States, from 1848 to the present. Themes and topics include: the legacies of colonialism, the Mexican-American War, transnational migration, the effects of economic stratification, race and racialization, and the impact of sexual and gender ideologies on the lives of Mexicans residing north of the border.
Last offered: Spring 2015

HISTORY 273: The European Expansion (HISTORY 373A)

The relationship between European monarchies and their colonial domains from the 16th-18th centuries. Reasons for expansion, methods, and results. Case studies include the Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, French, and English domains in Africa, Asia, and the Americas. Readings include primary and secondary sources.

HISTORY 273E: The Emergence of Nations in Latin America: Independence Through 1880 (HISTORY 373E)

This course provides an introduction to the main themes of nineteenth-century Latin American history, including independence from Spain, the emergence of various nation-states, and the development of a new social, political, and economic order in the region
Last offered: Winter 2016

HISTORY 274C: The History of Mexicans and Mexican Americans (CHILATST 274, HISTORY 374C)

This course will explore the history of Mexican migrants and Mexican Americans from 1848 to the present.
Terms: Win | Units: 5

HISTORY 274E: Urban Poverty and Inequality in Latin America

We examine historical issues of social inequality, poverty, crime, industrialization, globalization, and environment in major Latin American cities.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 278B: The Historical Ecology of Latin America (HISTORY 378)

What role did the natural environment play in the emergence of Latin America as a distinct geographical and socio-cultural world region? How do we analyze the historical relationship between the regions rich and seemingly abundant natural resources and its status as "underdeveloped"? What historical consequences did this relationship have and what alternative, more sustainable developmental paths can we envision for the future in light of the past that we will study? In this course, students will become familiar with the historiography on Latin America (with emphasis on Mexico) that has explored these questions through a variety of approaches, methodologies and points of view.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Wolfe, M. (PI)

HISTORY 279: Latin American Development: Economy and Society, 1800-2014 (HISTORY 379)

The newly independent nations of Latin America began the 19th century with economies roughly equal to the U.S. and Canada. What explains the economic gap that developed since 1800? Why are some Latin American nations rich and others poor and how have societies changed over time? Marxist, dependency, neoclassical, and institutionalist interpretive frameworks are explored. The effects of globalization on Latin American economic growth, autonomy, and potential for social justice are examined and debated.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom
Instructors: Frank, Z. (PI)

HISTORY 279D: Modern Brazil: Economy, Society & Culture (HISTORY 379D)

This course addresses the history of modern Brazil from independence in 1822 to the present day. The class focuses on theories of economic development, social structure and change, and cultural life in Brazil's diverse regions.

HISTORY 280B: The Birth of Islam: Authority, Community, and Resistance (GLOBAL 134, GLOBAL 234, HISTORY 380B)

This course explores the historical problem of how authority and community (in both the political and religious sense) were defined and challenged in the early Islamic period. Chronological topics covered include: the political, cultural, and religious world of Late Antiquity into which Muhammad was born; the crystallization of a small community of believers who supported Muhammad's message of radical monotheism and aided him in the conquest and conversion of the Arabian Peninsula; the problems of legacy and leadership in the community of the faithful after Muhammad's death; the Arabo-Islamic conquests beyond Arabia during the 7th and early 8th centuries and the establishment of the first Islamic empire under the rule of the Umayyad clan; the Sunni/Shi'a split (and further splits in Shi'ism); the revolution of 750 A.D. and overthrow of the Umayyads by the 'Abbasids; the flourishing of a sophisticated world of learning and culture under the 'Abbasids; and the waning of the 'Abbasids empire in the tenth century and political reconfiguration of the Islamic lands.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Izzo, J. (PI)
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