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31 - 40 of 540 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 23N: The Soviet Union and the World: View from the Hoover Archives

This course seeks to explore the Soviet Union's influence on the world from 1917 to its end in 1991 from a variety of perspectives. Hoover Institution archival holdings will be the basic sources for the course.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Naimark, N. (PI)

HISTORY 25: St. Petersburg: A Cultural Biography

This course explores the rich cultural heritage of St. Petersburg: art, architecture, urban planning, literature, dance, music, theater. Lectures will be extensively slide-illustrated, particularly on architecture and art. The course will meet Thursday evenings 7:00-9:00 pm as part of the Continuing Studies Program (CSP) for adult students; undergraduate students are welcome to participate by enrolling in this 1-unit History course. Readings will be posted in Coursework for CSP participants and will be available but optional for undergraduate students. Satisfactory credit for undergraduates will be earned by attending 80% of the lectures and by submitting a 5-page paper on a topic of the student's choice utilizing the CSP assigned readings and sources suggested by the instructor.
Last offered: Spring 2015

HISTORY 25N: Stalin's Europe, 1944-1948

This freshman seminar explores the history of wartime and postwar Europe through the lenses of the communist parties of Europe, the anti-Soviet forces on the continent, the devastation of the civilian population, and the intentions and actions of the Soviet Union on the one hand, and the United States on the other. We will analyze issues of resistance and collaboration under the Nazis, Allied occupation, and the division of Europe. We will also consider the forcible displacement of peoples and the fate of Jewish survivors. The idea is to understand the harsh and complex realities of European life and politics in this crucial time frame spanning war and peace. One can discover the beginnings of the Cold War in this period, the first signs of the "Iron Curtain," and the origins of the European Union. Our sources for the reconstruction of European life at this crucial time include documents, memoirs, literature, film, and various collections at the Hoover Archives. In addition to analyzing written and visual materials in discussion, presentations, and short essays, you will engage in a quarter long project on one thematic or country study during this period.
Last offered: Winter 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 28S: Napoleon

This course examines the life and times of Napoleon Bonaparte. For twenty years, Napoleon commanded and captivated Europe, evoking fascination and fear in equal measure and profoundly shaping the course of the modern world. In this course we follow the arc of his career, from revolutionary to emperor to exile, with each week devoted to a different theme of his life and the age in which he lived. Topics include politics, warfare, revolution, colonialism, gender, popular culture, and the arts. The course has no prerequisites and all readings are in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Hay, N. (PI)

HISTORY 29SC: Water and Power in the Pacific Northwest: The Columbia River (CEE 17SC, EARTHSYS 16SC, POLISCI 14SC)

This seminar will explore the nature of and coupling between water and energy resources in the Pacific Northwest, using the Columbia River as our case study. We will explore the hydrologic, meteorologic, and geologic basis of water and energy resources, and the practical, social, environmental, economic, and political issues surrounding their development in the West. The Columbia River and its watershed provide a revealing prototype for examining these issues. A transnational, multi-state river with the largest residual populations of anadromous salmonids in the continental US, it provides a substantial fraction of the electrical energy produced in the Northwest (the Grand Coulee dam powerhouse on the Columbia is the largest-capacity hydropower facility in the US), it is a major bulk commodity transportation link to the interior West via its barge navigation system, it provides the water diversions supporting a large area of irrigated agriculture in Washington and Idaho, and its waters more »
This seminar will explore the nature of and coupling between water and energy resources in the Pacific Northwest, using the Columbia River as our case study. We will explore the hydrologic, meteorologic, and geologic basis of water and energy resources, and the practical, social, environmental, economic, and political issues surrounding their development in the West. The Columbia River and its watershed provide a revealing prototype for examining these issues. A transnational, multi-state river with the largest residual populations of anadromous salmonids in the continental US, it provides a substantial fraction of the electrical energy produced in the Northwest (the Grand Coulee dam powerhouse on the Columbia is the largest-capacity hydropower facility in the US), it is a major bulk commodity transportation link to the interior West via its barge navigation system, it provides the water diversions supporting a large area of irrigated agriculture in Washington and Idaho, and its watershed is home to significant sources of solar and wind energy. We will use the Columbia to study water and energy resources, and especially their coupling, in the context of rapid climate change, ecosystem impacts, economics, and public policy. We will begin with a week of classroom study and discussion on campus, preparing for the field portion of the seminar. We will then travel to the Columbia basin, spending approximately 10 days visiting a number of water and energy facilities across the watershed, e.g., solar, wind, and natural gas power plants; dams and reservoirs with their powerhouses, fish passage facilities, navigation locks, and flood-mitigation systems; an irrigation project; operation centers; and offices of regulatory agencies. We will meet with relevant policy experts and public officials, along with some of the stakeholders in the basin. Over the summer students will be responsible for assigned readings from several sources, including monographs, online materials, and recent news articles. During the trip, students will work in small groups to analyze and assess one aspect of the coupling between water and energy resources in the Northwest. The seminar will culminate in presentations on these analyses. Travel expenses during the seminar will be provided (except incidentals) by the Bill Lane Center for the American West and Sophomore College.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2

HISTORY 30C: Culture and Society in Reformation England

(Same as History 130C. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 130C.) Focuses on the appeal of both Reformed and Catholic ideas in the political and cultural contexts of early modern Europe. Topics include: the Lutheran revolt; the spread of Protestant ideas; Calvin's Geneva; the English Reformation; Tridentine reform and the Jesuits; toleration and the underground churches; wars and religious violence; and the making of European confessional identities. Sources include sermons, religious polemic, autobiographies, graphic prints, poetry, and music.

HISTORY 33A: Blood and Roses: The Age of the Tudors

(Same as HISTORY 133A. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 133A.) English society and state from the Wars of the Roses to the death of Elizabeth. Political, social, and cultural upheavals of the Tudor period and the changes wrought by the Reformation. The establishment of the Tudor monarchy; destruction of the Catholic church; rise of Puritanism; and 16th-century social and economic changes.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI

HISTORY 36N: Gay Autobiography (FEMGEN 36N)

Preference to freshmen. Gender, identity, and solidarity as represented in nine autobiographies: Isherwood, Ackerley, Duberman, Monette, Louganis, Barbin, Cammermeyer, Gingrich, and Lorde. To what degree do these writers view sexual orientation as a defining feature of their selves? Is there a difference between the way men and women view identity? What politics follow from these writers' experiences?
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED

HISTORY 37D: Germany's Wars and the World, 1848-2010 (HISTORY 137D)

( History 37D is 3 units; History 137D is 5 units.)This course examines a series of explosive encounters between Germans, Europe, and the world. Starting with the overlooked revolutions of 1848 and ending with the reunification of West Germany and East Germany after the Cold War, the course will explore a range of topics: capitalism, communism, imperialism, nationalism, diplomacy, antisemitism, gender, race, and the Holocaust, among others. We will also consider competing visions of Germany its borders, its members, its enemies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Press, S. (PI)

HISTORY 39: Modern Britain and the British Empire

(Same as HISTORY 139. History majors and others taking 5 units, register in 139.) From American Independence to the latest war in Iraq. Topics include: the rise of the modern British state and economy; imperial expansion and contraction; the formation of class, gender, and national identities; mass culture and politics; the world wars; and contemporary racial politics. Focus is on questions of decline, the fortunes and contradictions of British liberalism in an era of imperialism, and the weight of the past in contemporary Britain.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Satia, P. (PI)
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