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291 - 300 of 540 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 261: Race, Gender, and Class in Jim Crow America

How African American life and labor were redefined from 1890-1954. Topics include family life, work, leisure patterns, transnational relations, cultural expressions emphasizing literature and music, resistance and social activisim. Primary sources including visual materials, literature, and film; historical interpretations of the period.
Last offered: Winter 2009 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

HISTORY 261D: Democracy in Crisis: Historical Perspectives

Scholars and pundits warn that American democracy is in crisis. But what is at stake? How new is this crisis? And can historical analysis offer insight into our present predicament?nnThis course will examine five historical crises of democracy: the Constitutional Convention, the Civil War, the Progressive Movement, World War II, and the protest movements of the 1960s. For each crisis, we will explore the political, cultural, and intellectual factors that defined and resolved (or failed to resolve) each crisis.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Johnson, N. (PI)

HISTORY 261E: Introduction to Asian American History (AMSTUD 261W, ASNAMST 261)

This course provides an introduction to the field of Asian American history. Tracing this history between the arrival of the first wave of Asian immigrants to the US in the mid-nineteenth century and the present, we foreground the voices and personal histories of seemingly everyday Asian Americans. In the process, the course disrupts totalizing national historical narratives that center the US nation-state and its political leaders as the primary agents of historical change.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Gow, W. (PI)

HISTORY 261G: Presidents and Foreign Policy in Modern History (INTNLREL 173)

Nothing better illustrates the evolution of the modern presidency than the arena of foreign policy. This class will examine the changing role and choices of successive presidential administrations over the past century, examining such factors as geopolitics, domestic politics, the bureaucracy, ideology, psychology, and culture. Students will be encouraged to think historically about the institution of the presidency, while examining specific case studies, from the First World War to the conflicts of the 21st century.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Rakove, R. (PI)

HISTORY 263C: Nature's Bounty: Natural Resources and U.S. Political Economy

The United States has long been among the wealthiest countries in the world, and its economic life has been closely tied to natural resource extraction. Taking the relation between these two historical facts as a question to be examined rather than a truism to be repeated, this course considers the histories of fossil fuels, plantation agriculture, farming, forestry, fishing, and nuclear energy as they relate to wealth, poverty, and economic thought.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Adams, B. (PI)

HISTORY 263D: Junipero Serra

Why is Junipero Serra considered a representative figure of California? How have assessments of Serra evolved over the last 200 years? Why does his name appear so often on our campus? In this course we will consider these and other questions in terms of Spanish empire, Native American history, California politics of memory and commemoration, among other approachs. Requirements include weekly reading, class discussion, a field trip to Carmel Mission, short writing assignments, and a formal debate on the ethics naming university or public buildings after historical figures with contested pasts. Taught in English.
Last offered: Autumn 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 264: History of Prisons and Immigration Detention (AMSTUD 264, CSRE 264, HISTORY 364)

This course will explore the history of the growing prison and immigration detention systems in the United States. They will pay particular attention to how they developed and how they affect different populations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5

HISTORY 264D: Modern America in Historical Perspective (SIW 185)

Last offered: Autumn 2018

HISTORY 267E: Martin Luther King, Jr. - His Life, Ideas, and Legacy (AFRICAAM 267E, AMSTUD 267E)

Using the unique documentary resources and publications of Stanford's King Research and Education Institute, this course will provide a general introduction to King's life, visionary ideas, and historical significance. In addition to lectures and discussions, the course will include presentations of documentaries such as Eyes on the Prize. Students will be expected to read the required texts, participate in class discussions, and submit a research paper or an audio-visual project developed in consultation with the professor.
Last offered: Winter 2015

HISTORY 269F: Modern American History: From Civil Rights to Human Rights (HISTORY 369F)

( History 269F is an undergraduate course offered for 5 units; History 369F is a graduate course offered for 4-5 units.) This focuses on American social justice movements during the years since the passage of landmark civil rights legislation during the 1960s, with particular emphasis on efforts to extend rights to all people.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Carson, C. (PI)
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