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201 - 210 of 540 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 207D: Transhistory Colloquium (FEMGEN 207D, FEMGEN 307D, HISTORY 307D)

Colloquium on the history of transgender practices and identities. Readings will include scholarly texts from the emerging historical field of transhistory as well as adjacent fields within gender history. Colloquium will investigate avenues for deepening transhistory through further historical inquiry.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Stokes, L. (PI)

HISTORY 208: Private Lives, Public Stories: Autobiography in Women's History

Changing contexts of women's lives and how women's actions have shaped and responded to those contexts.
Last offered: Winter 2010 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender

HISTORY 208D: Pre-Modern Warfare (HISTORY 308D)

This course examines the evolving nature of warfare and its impact on society across the Eurasian continent up to the Gunpowder Revolution and rise of the nation-state. Beginning with an attempt to define war, it will trace the evolution of military technology from the Stone Age through the rise of the chariot, the sword, and the mounted rider, and examine how changing methods of conducting warfare were inextricably linked to changes in the social order and political structures.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Lewis, M. (PI)

HISTORY 208S: Facing the Past: The Politics of Retrospective Justice

Forms of injustice in history including slavery, genocide, ethnic cleansing, mass rape, forced religious conversion, and torture of prisoners. Mechanisms developed over the last century to define, deter, and alleviate the effects of such offenses, including war crimes tribunals, truth commissions, national apologies, and monetary reparations. Case studies chart the international field of retrospective justice, exploring the legal, political, and moral implications of confronting traumatic pasts.
Last offered: Autumn 2010 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

HISTORY 209B: The Idea of Politics (HISTORY 309B)

Can we live without politics? Is politics indispensable for humanity and vice-versa? The idea of politics is that it must transform, through human action, conditions of collective life. But the 20th century produced colliding beliefs about what that life might be and what the human being itself might look like. Explore whether, after the century, we might still think of politics as an ethical idea and the "human" as foundational political category. Keywords: Civility, Cruelty, Friendship, Empire, Democracy, Humanism, Animals.

HISTORY 209D: Postcolonialism and Universalism (HISTORY 309A)

Key texts and motifs from postcolonial theory: empire, class, exile, suffering, textuality, archive in juxtaposition to 20th-century philosophical questions about universal history and the relevance of humanist inquiry.
Last offered: Winter 2011

HISTORY 209F: Maps in the Early Modern World (HISTORY 309F)

The significance of cartographic enterprise across the early modern world. Political, economic, and epistemological imperatives that drove the proliferation of nautical charts, domain surveys, city plans, atlases, and globes; the types of work such artifacts performed for their patrons, viewers, and subjects. Contributions of indigenous knowledge to imperial maps; the career of the map in commerce, surveillance, diplomacy, conquest, and indoctrination. Sources include recent research from Asia, Europe, and the Americas.

HISTORY 209J: History of Surveillance (GERMAN 112, GERMAN 312, HISTORY 309J)

The question of surveillance (and its limits) is increasingly becoming a concern for individuals, organizations, and states around the globe. Indeed, from NSA databases to Alexa recordings, surveillance seems to be an unavoidable aspect of modern life. But how did surveillance become an everyday experience? This course explores the technological advancements, political aims, ideological commitments, and military goals that have fueled the rise of surveillance, especially throughout the past century. We will examine the ways in which states and organizations have developed surveillance programs and the consequences that these programs have had on both the watchers and the watched.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 209S: Research Seminar for Majors

Required of History majors. How to conduct original, historical research and analysis, including methods such as using the libraries and archives at Stanford and elsewhere, and working collaboratively to frame topics, identify sources, and develop analyses. Autumn quarter focuses on American Political History and Race, Gender, Sexuality in U.S.; Winter quarter on Early Modern Travel Accounts and The Americas; Spring quarter on Modern Times and Open Topic.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5

HISTORY 210: The History of Occupation, 1914-2010 (HISTORY 310)

( History 210 is an undergraduate course offered for 5 units; History 310 is a graduate course offered for 4-5 units.) Examines the major cases of occupation in the twentieth century, from the first World War until the present, and issues of similarities, differences, and implications for contemporary policy making. Topics include European and Asian cases emerging from World War I and World War II, the Israeli occupation of the West Bank; the Soviet and American occupations of Afghanistan; and the American occupation of Iraq. Discussions will revolve around the problems, efficacy, and effects of occupation in historical perspective.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Naimark, N. (PI)
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