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131 - 140 of 540 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 148: The Egyptians (AFRICAAM 30, CLASSICS 82, HISTORY 48)

Overview of ancient Egyptian pasts, from predynastic times to Greco-Roman rule, roughly 3000 BCE to 30 BCE. Attention to archaeological sites and artifacts; workings of society; and cultural productions, both artistic and literary. Participation in class is required.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

HISTORY 149C: The Slave Trade

(Same as HISTORY 49C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 149C.) Slave trades and forms of slavery in W. Africa from 1000 to 1885; impacts on lives, social organization, and political structures. Slavery in Islam, the slave market in the Mediterranean and Middle East, and the Saharan slave trade. Slavery within Africa, growth of the Atlantic trade, the Middle Passage, and war and trade that produced slaves. Impact of the Industrial Revolution and European abolition movements on the use of slaves and warfare in Africa. The relationship between slaving and the European conquest of Africa.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

HISTORY 150A: Colonial and Revolutionary America (AMSTUD 150A)

(Same as HISTORY 50A. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for HISTORY 150A.) Survey of the origins of American society and polity in the 17th and 18th centuries. Topics: the migration of Europeans and Africans and the impact on native populations; the emergence of racial slavery and of regional, provincial, Protestant cultures; and the political origins and constitutional consequences of the American Revolution.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

HISTORY 150B: Nineteenth Century America (AFRICAAM 150B, AMSTUD 150B, CSRE 150S)

(Same as HISTORY 50B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 150B.) Territorial expansion, social change, and economic transformation. The causes and consequences of the Civil War. Topics include: urbanization and the market revolution; slavery and the Old South; sectional conflict; successes and failures of Reconstruction; and late 19th-century society and culture.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-SI

HISTORY 150C: The United States in the Twentieth Century (AFRICAAM 150C, AMSTUD 150C)

(Same as HISTORY 50C. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 150C.) 100 years ago, women and most African-Americans couldn't vote; automobiles were rare and computers didn't exist; and the U.S. was a minor power in a world dominated by European empires. This course surveys politics, culture, and social movements to answer the question: How did we get from there to here? Two historical research "labs" or archival sessions focus on the Great Depression in the 1930s and radical and conservative students movements of the 1960s. Suitable for non-majors and majors alike.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 151: The American West (AMSTUD 124A, ARTHIST 152, ENGLISH 124, POLISCI 124A)

The American West is characterized by frontier mythology, vast distances, marked aridity, and unique political and economic characteristics. This course integrates several disciplinary perspectives into a comprehensive examination of Western North America: its history, physical geography, climate, literature, art, film, institutions, politics, demography, economy, and continuing policy challenges. Students examine themes fundamental to understanding the region: time, space, water, peoples, and boom and bust cycles.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

HISTORY 151B: The End of American Slavery, 1776-1865 (HISTORY 51B)

How did the institution of American slavery come to an end? The story is more complex than most people know. This course examines the rival forces that fostered slavery's simultaneous contraction in the North and expansion in the South between 1776 and 1861. It also illuminates, in detail, the final tortuous path to abolition during the Civil War. Throughout, the course introduces a diverse collection of historical figures, including seemingly paradoxical ones, such as slaveholding southerners who professed opposition to slavery and non-slaveholding northerners who acted in ways that preserved it. Historical attitudes toward race are a central integrative theme.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Hammann, A. (PI)

HISTORY 152: History of American Law (HISTORY 352B)

(Formerly Law 318. Now Law 3504.) This course examines the growth and development of American legal institutions with particular attention to crime and punishment, slavery and race relations, the role of law in developing the economy, and the place of lawyers in American society, from colonial times to the present. Special Instructions: Any student may write a paper in lieu of the final exam with consent of instructor. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Final exam or paper. Automatic grading penalty waived for writers. Cross-listed with History ( HISTORY 152 Consent of instructor required) & ( HISTORY 352B).
Terms: Win | Units: 5

HISTORY 152K: America as a World Power: U.S. Foreign Relations, 1914 to Present (INTNLREL 168)

This course will examine the modern history of American foreign relations, from 1914 to the present. Beginning with the fateful decision to intervene in the First World War, it will examine the major crises and choices that have defined the "American Century." Our study of U.S. foreign relations will consider such key factors as geopolitics, domestic politics, bureaucracy, psychology, race, and culture. Students will be expected to undertake their own substantial examination of a critical episode in the era studied.
Last offered: Summer 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 153: Creation of the Constitution

The course begins with readings setting forth the intellectual and experiential background of the framing, including common law and natural rights theory, republicanism, economic & political scientific ideas, and colonial and post-Independence experience. We then study large parts of the debates at the Constitutional Convention, primarily using Madison's Notes. Major topics are the principle of representation, the extent and enumeration of national powers, the construction of the executive and judicial branches, and slavery. Next come the ratification debates, including readings from antifederalist writers, The Federalist, and speeches in ratification conventions. We conclude with the addition of the Bill of Rights. Classes consist of a combination of lecture and extensive participation by students. Elements used in grading: Class participation, In-class exam, supplemented by short take-home essay. Cross-listed with the Law School ( LAW 7017).
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
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