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551 - 560 of 576 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 444: Graduate Research Seminar: Gender in Science, Medicine, and Engineering (FEMGEN 444)

Theory and practice of gender in STEM. 1. "Fix the Numbers of Women" focuses on increasing women's participation; 2. "Fix the Institutions" promotes gender equality in careers through structural change in research organizations; 3. "Fix the Knowledge" or "gendered innovations" stimulates excellence in science and technology by integrating gender analysis into research. Seminar explores harnessing the creative power of gender analysis to enhance knowledge and spark innovation.
Last offered: Autumn 2014

HISTORY 444C: The History of the Body in Science, Medicine, and Culture (HISTORY 244C)

The human body as a natural and cultural object, historicized. The crosscultural history of the body from the 18th century to the present. Topics include: sciences of sex and race; medical discovery of particular body parts; human experimentation, foot binding, veiling, and other bodily coverings; thinness and obesity; notions of the body politic.
Last offered: Spring 2007

HISTORY 445A: Research Seminar in African History

Primary sources such as government records and missionary archives. Students present work in progress. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Last offered: Winter 2014

HISTORY 445B: Research Seminar in African History

Primary sources such as government records and missionary archives. Students present work in progress. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Last offered: Spring 2014

HISTORY 459A: Grad Research Seminar in U.S. History

Last offered: Autumn 2014

HISTORY 460: Research Seminar in America in the World

Ways to place American history in an international context. Comparative, transnational, diplomatic, and world systems are approaches to complete a research paper based on research into primary materials. Historical methodologies, research strategies, and essay projects. May be repeated for credit.
Last offered: Winter 2016 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

HISTORY 461A: Graduate Research Seminar on the History of Women, Gender, the Family, and Sexuality (FEMGEN 461A)

Instructor consent required for non-History graduate students. Seminar introduces graduate students to current issues and methods in the history of women, gender, the family, and sexuality in the United States. After an initial period of working on secondary and primary source bibliographies, and some discussion of secondary readings, each student will choose a topic for an original research paper (20-30 pages) based on primary sources. Each student will complete a first draft of the paper by late May and a revised paper by the end of Spring Quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Freedman, E. (PI)

HISTORY 461B: Graduate Research Seminar on the History of Women, Gender, the Family, and Sexuality Part II (FEMGEN 461B)

Prerequisite: 461A.nnInstructor consent required for non-History graduate students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Freedman, E. (PI)

HISTORY 471A: Environmental History of Latin America

What role did the natural environment play in the emergence of Latin America as a distinct geographical and socio-cultural world region? How do we analyze the historical relationship between the regions rich and seemingly abundant natural resources and its status as underdeveloped? What historical consequences did this relationship have and what alternative, more sustainable developmental paths can we envision for the future in light of the past that we will study? In this course, students will become familiar with the historiography on Brazil, Mexico, Peru, Cuba and Honduras that has explored these questions through a variety of approaches, methodologies and points of view.
Last offered: Autumn 2013

HISTORY 471B: Environmental History of Latin America

What role did the natural environment play in the emergence of Latin America as a distinct geographical and socio-cultural world region? How do we analyze the historical relationship between the region's rich and seemingly abundant natural resources and its status as 'underdeveloped'? What historical consequences did this relationship have and what alternative, more sustainable developmental paths can we envision for the future in light of the past that we will study? In this course, students will become familiar with the historiography on Brazil, Mexico, Peru, Cuba and Honduras that has explored these questions through a variety of approaches, methodologies and points of view.
Last offered: Winter 2014
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