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351 - 360 of 576 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 299X: Preparing for International Field Work: Public Service or Research (HISTORY 399A)

Open to students in all classes, those planning internships abroad and those planning research, from juniors with honors theses and sophomores with Chappell Lougee grants to freshmen thinking ahead. Introduces resources on campus for planning international research and service. Raises issues that need to be considered in advance of going abroad: ethical concerns, Human Subjects Protocol, networking, personal safety and gender issues, confronting cultural differences. Exposes students to research methods: case studies, interviewing, working in foreign libraries and archives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

HISTORY 301E: Life Under Nazism

This course explores everyday life in the Third Reich. Moving inside political events, students will examine daily experiences in the Nazi state-- from Hitler's tumultuous rise to power through the end of World War Two. We will see how people navigated new ideologies, practices, anti-Semitism, war, and mass murder. Through analysis of memoirs, diaries, essays, novels, propaganda, scholarship, and film, students will investigate how social and political developments can reveal the very boundaries between self and society.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Sheffer, E. (PI)

HISTORY 301J: Objects of History: From "Material Culture" to "Making" (HISTORY 201J)

This class considers objects as historical sources. It surveys diverse approaches to the study and display of physical evidence, from "material culture" to "making." These explorations of object-oriented research will inform the course's hands-on components, working with objects and replicating historical experiences. With its focus on the question of what historical knowledge can be gained through interactivity, the course is suited to students whose interests include museums and public history, reenactment and performance, the maker movement, or interdisciplinary methodology.
Last offered: Spring 2016

HISTORY 301K: A History of the Global Left: Revolutionary Movements against Empire (HISTORY 201K)

This class will trace the formation of trans-regional movements against imperialism in the modern period that helped create a "global Left." We will read contemporary works by thinkers such as Lord Byron, Karl Marx, Mohandas K. Gandhi, Annie Besant, and Faiz Ahmad Faiz, as well as historical studies of these figures and the movements in which they figured. Key topics include the American Revolution, the Indian "Mutiny" of 1857, the Ghadar movement, Pan-Islamism, Irish nationalism, and global communism.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Satia, P. (PI)

HISTORY 302D: The History of Genocide (HISTORY 202D)

This course will explore the history, politics, and character of genocide from the beginning of world history to the present. It will also consider the ways that the international system has developed to prevent and punish genocide.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Naimark, N. (PI)

HISTORY 302G: Peoples, Armies and Governments of the Second World War (HISTORY 202G)

Clausewitz conceptualized war as always consisting of a trinity of passion, chance, and reason, mirrored, respectively, in the people, army and government. Following Clausewitz, this course examines the peoples, armies, and governments that shaped World War II. Analyzes the ideological, political, diplomatic and economic motivations and constraints of the belligerents and their resulting strategies, military planning and fighting. Explores the new realities of everyday life on the home fronts and the experiences of non-combatants during the war, the final destruction of National Socialist Germany and Imperial Japan, and the emerging conflict between the victors. How the peoples, armies and governments involved perceived their possibilities and choices as a means to understand the origins, events, dynamics and implications of the greatest war in history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Vardi, G. (PI)

HISTORY 302K: The Holocaust and Its Aftermath (HISTORY 202K, JEWISHST 282K, JEWISHST 382K)

This seminar gives an overview over different aspects of the history of the Holocaust and its aftermath and will examine key issues in recent Holocaust historiography and questions of memory and representation. Special emphasis is put on the nature of the historian's task, as viewed through the lens of historians of the Holocaust, as well as to the significance of the Holocaust in history and how it has changed over time. The course will confront students with historiographical texts and historical documents, with photography and film, works of scholarship and art.
Last offered: Spring 2017

HISTORY 303: Premodern Economic Cultures (HISTORY 203)

Modern economists have made a science of studying the aggregate effects of individual choices. This science is based on the realities of personal freedom and individual choice. Prior to the modern era, however, different realities comprised very different economic cultures: moral economies in which greed was evil and generosity benefitted the patron¿s soul; familial collectives operating within historical conditioned diasporas; economies of obligation that threatened to collapse under their own weight as economic structures shifted. In this course we will be reading cross-culturally to develop an understanding of the shared and distinct elements of premodern economic cultures.
Last offered: Spring 2014

HISTORY 303C: History of Ignorance

Scholars pay a lot of attention to knowledge--how it arises and impacts society--but much less attention has been given to ignorance, even though its impacts are equally profound. Here we explore the political history of ignorance, through case studies including: corporate denials of harms from particular products (tobacco, asbestos), climate change denialism, and creationist rejections of Darwinian evolution. Students will be expected to produce a research paper tracing the origins and impact of a particular form of ignorance.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Proctor, R. (PI)

HISTORY 303F: Words and Things in the History of Classical Scholarship (CLASSICS 331)

How have scholars used ancient texts and objects since the revival of the classical tradition? How did antiquarians study and depict objects and relate them to texts and reconstructions of the past? What changed and what stayed the same as humanist scholarship gave way to professional archaeologists, historians, and philologists? Focus is on key works in the history of classics, such as Erasmus and Winckelmann, in their scholarly, cultural, and political contexts, and recent critical trends in intellectual history and the history of disciplines.
Last offered: Autumn 2015
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