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261 - 270 of 576 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 243S: Human Origins: History, Evidence, and Controversy (HISTORY 443A)

Research seminar. Debates and controversies include: theories of human origins; interpretations of fossils, early art, and the oldest tools; the origin and fate of the Neanderthals; evolutionary themes in literature and film; visual rhetoric and cliché in anthropological dioramas and phyletic diagrams; the significance of hunting, gathering, and grandmothering; climatological theories and neocatastrophic geologies; molecular anthropology; the impact of racial theories on human origins discourse. Background in human evolution not required.
Last offered: Winter 2006 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

HISTORY 244C: The History of the Body in Science, Medicine, and Culture (HISTORY 444C)

The human body as a natural and cultural object, historicized. The crosscultural history of the body from the 18th century to the present. Topics include: sciences of sex and race; medical discovery of particular body parts; human experimentation, foot binding, veiling, and other bodily coverings; thinness and obesity; notions of the body politic.
Last offered: Spring 2007 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender

HISTORY 244F: Beyond Pink and Blue: Gender in Tech (FEMGEN 344F, HISTORY 344F)

This d-school seminar prototypes concepts and methods for "inclusive" design. From the moment we arrive on the planet, gender shapes our perception of the world. Examples of products (including objects, services, and systems) gone awry will serve as prompts for design activities, challenges, and discussions on gender issues to illustrate the different needs of women, men, and gender-fluid people. Class sessions mix use case explorations with design methodology, design thinking abilities, and guest speakers from technology, design, and academia. Students will be asked to work in interdisciplinary teams on several design challenges, culminating in the development of a toolkit for inclusive design. Methods will interact in crucial ways to create "intersectional thinking" (i.e., to consider how gender, ethnicity, sexuality, socio-economic status, etc. work together to require new solutions in design). Topics include: algorithms, media, seat belts for pregnant women, robotics, assistive technologies, tech for developing worlds, video games, urban/rural design, software development, and many more. Admission by application only. Visit d.school.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

HISTORY 245G: Law and Colonialism in Africa (HISTORY 348D)

Law in colonial Africa provides an opportunity to examine the meanings of social, cultural, and economic change in the anthropological, legal, and historical approaches. Court cases as a new frontier for the social history of Africa. Topics: meanings of conflicts over marriage, divorce, inheritance, property, and authority.
Last offered: Autumn 2012 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

HISTORY 246: The Dynamics of Change in Africa (AFRICAST 301A, HISTORY 346, POLISCI 246P, POLISCI 346P)

Crossdisciplinary colloquium; required for the M.A. degree in African Studies. Open to advanced undergraduates and PhD students. Addresses critical issues including patterns of economic collapse and recovery; political change and democratization; and political violence, civil war, and genocide. Focus on cross-cutting issues including the impact of colonialism; the role of religion, ethnicity, and inequality; and Africa's engagement with globalization.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Getz, T. (PI)

HISTORY 247C: Revolutionary Mothers, National Fathers: Household, Politics and Nation in 20th Century Africa

A luta continua! This cry, Latin for "the struggle continues," evokes sub-Saharan African liberation struggles. Yet histories of these struggles sometimes cast them narrowly: as quests to transform European colonies into African-governed sovereign nation-states; struggles led by men; or public struggles, conducted in government buildings or on the streets. This course examines how freedom fighting intersected with other processes: changing gender norms, ethnic or religious identification, and labor or housing conditions, paying attention to ways political struggles came into homes.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Quinn, S. (PI)

HISTORY 248D: Histories of Race in Science and Medicine at Home and Abroad (AFRICAAM 122F, AFRICAST 122F, CSRE 122F)

This course has as its primary objective, the historical study of the intersection of race, science and medicine in the US and abroad with an emphasis on Africa and its Diasporas in the US. By drawing on literature from history, science and technology studies, sociology and other related disciplines, the course will consider the sociological and cultural concept of race and its usefulness as an analytical category. The course will explore how the study of race became its own ¿science¿ in the late-Enlightenment era, the history of eugenics--a science of race aimed at the ostensible betterment of the overall population through the systematic killing or "letting die" of humanity¿s "undesirable" parts, discuss how the ideology of pseudo-scientific racism underpinned the health policies of the French and British Empires in Africa, explore the fraught relationship between race and medicine in the US, discuss how biological notions of race have quietly slipped back into scientific projects in the 21st century and explore how various social justice advocates and scholars have resisted the scientific racisms of the present and future and/or proposed new paths towards a more equitable and accessible science.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Hill, R. (PI)

HISTORY 250A: History of California Indians (CSRE 117S, NATIVEAM 117S)

Demographic, political, and economic history of California Indians, 1700s-1950s. Processes and events leading to the destruction of California tribes, and their effects on the groups who survived. Geographic and cultural diversity. Spanish, Mexican, and Anglo-American periods. The mission system.
Last offered: Autumn 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED

HISTORY 250E: Taxing America: From the Puritans to Prop. 13

Taxes have shaped American society and politics since before the Revolution. And they've been extremely controversial just as long. In this course we'll try to understand American society and government by looking at the politics of taxation from the colonial period to the twentieth century. Topics include the legitimacy of taxation, the constitution, economic development, inequality, gender, and race.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 251J: The End of American Slavery, 1776-1865 (AFRICAAM 251J, AMSTUD 251J, HISTORY 351J)

How did the institution of American slavery come to an end? The story is more complex than most people know. This course examines the rival forces that fostered slavery's simultaneous contraction in the North and expansion in the South between 1776 and 1861. It also illuminates, in detail, the final tortuous path to abolition during the Civil War. Throughout, the course introduces a diverse collection of historical figures, including seemingly paradoxical ones, such as slaveholding southerners who professed opposition to slavery and non-slaveholding northerners who acted in ways that preserved it. Historical attitudes toward race are a central integrative theme.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Hammann, A. (PI)
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