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251 - 260 of 576 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 239C: Humanities Core: Great Books, Big Ideas -- Europe, Modern (DLCL 13, FRENCH 13, HUMCORE 13, PHIL 13)

This three-quarter sequence asks big questions of major texts in the European and American tradition. What is a good life? How should society be organized? Who belongs? How should honor, love, sin, and similar abstractions govern our actions? What duty do we owe to the past and future? This third and final quarter focuses on the modern period, from the rise of revolutionary ideas to the experiences of totalitarianism and decolonization in the twentieth century. Authors include Locke, Mary Shelley, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Weber, Primo Levi, and Frantz Fanon.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ER

HISTORY 239F: Empire and Information (HISTORY 339F)

How do states see? How do they know what they know about their subjects, citizens, economies, and geographies? How does that knowledge shape society, politics, identity, freedom, and modernity? Focus is on the British imperial state activities in S. Asia and Britain: surveillance technologies and information-gathering systems, including mapping, statistics, cultural schemata, and intelligence systems, to render geographies and social bodies legible, visible, and governable.
Last offered: Autumn 2005 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom | Repeatable for credit

HISTORY 239G: The Algerian Wars (CSRE 249, FRENCH 249, JEWISHST 249)

From Algiers the White to Algiers the Red, Algiers, the Mecca of the Revolutionaries in the words of Amilcar Cabral, this course offers to study the Algerian Wars since the French conquest of Algeria (1830-) to the Algerian civil war of the 1990s. We will revisit the ways in which the war has been narrated in literature and cinema, popular culture, and political discourse. A special focus will be given to the Algerian War of Independence (1954-1962). The course considers the racial representations of the war in the media, the continuing legacies surrounding the conflict in France, Africa, and the United States, from Che Guevara to the Black Panthers. A key focus will be the transmission of collective memory through transnational lenses, and analyses of commemorative events and movies. nReadings from James Baldwin, Assia Djebar, Albert Camus, Frantz Fanon, Mouloud Feraoun. Movies include "The Battle of Algiers," "Days of Glory," and "Viva Laldjérie." nTaught in English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Ulloa, M. (PI)

HISTORY 239H: Colonialism and Empire in Modern Europe

To better understand the history of modern Europe within a global context, explores the following questions: What impact did more than a century of colonialism have on the social lives, cultural attitudes, political loyalties, and intellectual world views of European women and men during the nineteenth century? What accounts for the resiliency of empire during a period of rapid global change that witnessed the rise of modern democracy, economic liberalism, ethnic nationalism, and international socialism?
Last offered: Winter 2010 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

HISTORY 240: The History of Evolution (BIO 340, HISTORY 340)

This course examines the history of evolutionary biology from its emergence around the middle of the eighteenth century. We will consider the continual engagement of evolutionary theories of life with a larger, transforming context: philosophical, political, social, economic, institutional, aesthetic, artistic, literary. Our goal will be to achieve a historical rich and nuanced understanding of how evolutionary thinking about life has developed to its current form.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Riskin, J. (PI)

HISTORY 240G: Science and Empire, 1500-1900 (HISTORY 340G)

During the scientific revolution of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, European states carved out vast colonial empires in Asia, Africa, and the Americas. How did empires make science and how did science make empires? In this course, we will explore the history of the global exchange of people, objects, and knowledge. We will consider how early modern science, medicine, and technology helped create global empires, while emerging across the division of the world into "the West and the rest."
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Statman, A. (PI)

HISTORY 241D: Einstein and the Structure of Reality (HISTORY 341D)

Albert Einstein once remarked "One cannot help but be in awe when one contemplates the mysteries of the marvelous structure of reality. It is enough if one tries to contemplate only a little of this mystery each day." In this course we will contemplate the history, science, and philosophy involved in three pathbreaking and contentious episodes in Einstein's lifelong quest to unveil the structure of reality: the special theory of relativity, the general theory of relativity, and the quantum theory.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 242D: Knowledge and Information Infrastructures (STS 166)

This course introduces historical, theoretical, and comparative perspectives on knowledge and information systems from the medieval world to the present. Cases include libraries, meteorology, climate science, the Internet, the World Wide Web, and social science data systems. It theorizes how infrastructures form, how they change, and how they shape (and are shaped by) social systems. The course ends with challenges to modern knowledge infrastructures, such as crowdsourcing, citizen science, and alternative and bogus knowledge.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Edwards, P. (PI)

HISTORY 242F: Medicine in an Age of Empires (HISTORY 342F)

This course connects changing ways of understanding the body and disease in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries to the business of empire. How did new ideas and methods of selling medicine relate to the rise of state-sponsored violence, resource extraction, global trade, and enslaved labor? Following black ritual practitioners in the Caribbean, apothecaries in England, and scientists abroad reveals the diversity of medical traditions and knowledge production in the early modern period that formed the basis of modern medicine today.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Dorner, Z. (PI)

HISTORY 243G: Tobacco and Health in World History (HISTORY 343G)

Cigarettes are the world's leading cause of death--but how did we come into this world, where 6 trillion cigarettes are smoked every year? Here we explore the political, cultural, and technological origins of the cigarette and cigarette epidemic, using the tobacco industry's 80 million pages of secret documents. Topics include the history of cigarette advertising and cigarette design, the role of the tobacco industry in fomenting climate change denial, and questions raised by the testimony of experts in court.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
Instructors: Proctor, R. (PI)
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