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241 - 250 of 576 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 235F: Camus (CSRE 129, FRENCH 129)

"The Don Draper of Existentialism" for Adam Gopnik, "the ideal husband of contemporary letters" for Susan Sontag, and "the admirable conjunction of a man, of an action, and of a work" for Sartre, Camus embodies the very French figure of the "intellectuel engagé," or public intellectual. From his birth in 1913 into a poor family in Algeria to the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1957, from Saint Germain-des-Prés to his predilection for the mediterranean culture, Camus captured the quest for universalism, for the politics of justice, and engaged in the great ethical battles of his time, from the fight against nazism and communism, from questioning colonial rules to the haunting Algerian War, and his complex "silence" over the war. Camus the Algerian, Camus the moralist, Camus the Resistant: through readings and films, we will explore his multiple, long-lasting legacies. Readings from Albert Camus, Kamel Daoud, Mouloud Feraoun, Alice Kaplan, Orhan Pamuk, A.B. Yehoshua, Assia Djebar, Jean-Paul Sartre, Yasmina Khadra. Movies include "The Stranger," and "Far from Men." This course is a gateway for French Studies, with special emphasis on oral proficiency. Taught in French.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Ulloa, M. (PI)

HISTORY 236: The Ethics of Imperialism

Can a commitment to liberty, progress, and universal rights be reconciled with imperialism? The ethical underpinnings of empire; how modern Europeans provided ethical and political justifications for colonial expansion. How European ideals were used to defend and justify inequality, violence, and genocide. The ethics of American-driven globalization and humanitarianism. Texts include primary sources, philosophical treatises, and historical studies.
Last offered: Autumn 2007 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

HISTORY 236F: The End of the World As They Knew It: Culture, Caf├ęs, and Crisis in Europe, 1880-1918 (HISTORY 336F)

The years stretching from roughly 1880 to end of the First World War were marked by profound social upheaval and an intense burst of creativity. This seminar will focus on the major cultural movements and big ideas of the period. Topics covered include the rise of mass culture and cinema, the origins of psychoanalysis, anti-Semitism and Zionism, new anxieties about sexuality and the ¿New Woman,¿ anarchism, decadence, degeneration, and Dada ¿ with cameos from Bernhardt, Freud, Klimt, Nietzsche, Toulouse-Lautrec, Wilde, Zola, and other luminaries of the age.
Last offered: Winter 2015

HISTORY 237D: The French Revolution and the Birth of Modern Politics (HISTORY 337D)

(Students who have taken HISTORY 134 should not enroll in this course.) This course will focus on the birth of modern politics in the French Revolution. The goal will be to understand the structural contradictions of the French monarchy in the pre-revolutionary period, the reasons for the monarchy's failure to resolve those contradictions, and the political dynamic unleashed as they were solved by the revolutionary action of 1789. Sovereignty, democracy, rights, representation, and terror will be principal themes. Lectures will be combined with close reading and discussions of political and philosophical writings of the period.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Baker, K. (PI)

HISTORY 237F: 20th Century British History through the Hoover Archives (HISTORY 337F)

From the rich resources of the Hoover Institution, the students in this course will select a particular archive (war posters, politician, spy, literary figure, diplomat, etc. etc.) to investigate, to write about,discuss in class, and, it is hoped, present in an exhibition at the Hoover, learning museum skills along the way as well as the history of Britain in the 20th century.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 237G: Outer Space Exploration in Germany in the Twentieth Century (GERMAN 275)

Since the nineteenth century, Germans, like their counterparts around the world, have considered the meaning and the role of humanity in outer space. As space travel developed from a dream to a reality, and as Germany changed borders and political systems among empires, dictatorships, socialist states, and capitalist states, German interest in spaceflight remained, although the meaning found in the stars changed dramatically. This course considers Germans' dreams of and predictions for outer space travel alongside German technological developments in spaceflight. It includes the different German states throughout the century, including Weimar Germany, National Socialism, East Germany, and West Germany. The course looks at science fiction films and novels, newspaper reports, scientific developments, and German space engineering projects, which together demonstrate how and why space travel often found high levels of support in Germany. Students will engage in historical and cultural analysis through course readings, discussions, and assignments.nNOTE: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take this course for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Anderson, C. (PI)

HISTORY 238D: Germany and the World Wars, 1870-1990 (HISTORY 338D, JEWISHST 288D, JEWISHST 388D)

(Students who have taken History 38A/138A should not enroll in this course.) This course examines Germany's tumultuous history from the Second Empire through the end of the Cold War. During this time, Germany ushered in five regimes and two world wars, seesawing between material ruin and economic prosperity on the frontline of Europe's military and ideological rifts. Beginning with Bismarck's wars of unification, the class spans World War One, the Weimar Republic, the rise of Nazism, World War Two, the Holocaust, the division of communist East and capitalist West Germany, and the fall of the Iron Curtain.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Sheffer, E. (PI)

HISTORY 238G: Ethnography of the Late Middle Ages: Social history and popular culture in the age of the plague (HISTORY 338G)

During the late Middle Ages, as Europe was recovering from the devastation of the Black Death, political reorganization contributed to a burst of archival documentation that allows historians richly detailed glimpses of societies in transition. We will be reading selected scholarly articles and monographs covering such topics as persecution, prechristian cultural remnants, folk theologies, festival cultures, peasant revolts, heresy, and the advent of the diabolic witch.
Last offered: Winter 2015

HISTORY 238J: The European Scramble for Africa: Origins and Debates

Why and how did Europeans claim control of 70% of African in the late nineteenth century? Students will engage with historiographical debates ranging from the national (e.g. British) to the topical (e.g. international law). Students will interrogate some of the primary sources on which debaters have rested their arguments. Key discussions include: the British occupation of Egypt; the autonomy of French colonial policy; the mystery of Germany¿s colonial entry; and, not least, the notorious Berlin Conference of 1884-1885.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Press, S. (PI)

HISTORY 238K: Vox Populi: Populism and its Origins (GERMAN 248, GERMAN 348, HISTORY 338K)

This seminar traces the proliferation of populism in contemporary Europe and the United States, with reference to the historical background of of anti-institutional and anti-representational ideas of popular sovereignty. Subjects include: the notion of 'vox populi' from the early middle ages to the early modern period; ideas of radical democracy in the enlightenment era; 19th century notions of identifying 'the people' (nation, 'Volk', class, race, mass); the populist, reform and volkish movements around 1900; the rise of fascist and totalitarian ideas of popular sovereignty; the struggle over the meaning of democracy in the Cold War era; semantic transformations of 'the popular' through the audio-visual media; and the rise of today's populism since 1989. The material to be analyzed will consist of 1. Primary sources (programs, manifests, pamphlets, speeches and propaganda material including visual sources); 2. Contemporary theoretical texts (political philosophy, history, sociology, psychology, and popular science); and 3. Today's theories and practices of populism. nNote: The course will be taught by Visiting Professor Christian Geulen, University of Koblenz, Germany
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5
Instructors: Geulen, C. (PI)
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