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211 - 220 of 576 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 209S: Research Seminar for Majors

Required of History majors. How to conduct original, historical research and analysis, including methods such as using the libraries and archives at Stanford and elsewhere, and working collaboratively to frame topics, identify sources, and develop analyses. Autumn quarter focuses on gender, race, sexuality and History of Science; Winter quarter on early modern travel and Europe before 1500; Spring quarter on American political history and open topic.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5

HISTORY 216: Women and the Book: Scribes, Artists, and Readers from Late Antiquity through the Fourteenth Century (ARTHIST 206H, FEMGEN 216, HISTORY 316)

This course examines the cultural worlds of medieval women through particular attention to the books that they owned, commissioned, and created. Beginning with the earliest Christian centuries, the course proceeds chronologically, charting women¿s book ownership, scribal and artistic activity, and patronage from Late Antiquity through the fourteenth century. In addition to examining specific manuscripts (in facsimile, or digitally), we will consider ancillary questions to do with women¿s authorship, education and literacy, reading patterns, devotional practices, and visual traditions and representation.
Last offered: Winter 2015

HISTORY 217S: Minorities In Medieval Europe (RELIGST 217X)

This course examines attitudes towards outsider groups within medieval society and the treatment of these groups by medieval Christians. Heretics, Jews, Muslims, homosexuals, prostitutes and usurers occupied ambivalent and at time dangerous positions within a society that increasingly defined itself as Christian. Differences in the treatment of these various 'outcast' groups, their depiction in art, their legal segregation, and their presumed association with demonic activity are addressed through discussion, and readings from primary and secondary source material.
Last offered: Spring 2015

HISTORY 218: The Holy Dead: Saints and Spiritual Power in Medieval Europe (HISTORY 318, RELIGST 218X, RELIGST 318X)

Examines the cult of saints in medieval religious thought and life. Topics include martyrs, shrines, pilgrimage, healing, relics, and saints' legends.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5

HISTORY 219C: Science, Technology, and Modernity in the Soviet Union (HISTORY 319C)

Science and technology were integral to the Soviet claim to offer a vision of modernity superior to that of Western capitalism. Science and technology would flourish; society would develop on a scientific basis. The results were more complex than the vision. Topics to be covered: science and Marxism-Leninism; the Lysenko affair; the R&D system; the role of the secret police; the atomic project; the space race; missile development; Andrei Sakharov; technology and innovation.
Last offered: Spring 2014

HISTORY 220G: Demons, Witches, Old Believers, Holy Fools, and Folk Belief: Popular Religion in Russia (HISTORY 320G, REES 220G, REES 320G)

19th and early 20th centuries. Peasants, parish priests, witches, possessed persons, cults and sects, old believers, saints, and women's religious communities. Nominally Christian, and members of the Orthodox Church, Russians embraced beliefs and customs that combined teaching from Church and folk traditions.
Last offered: Autumn 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

HISTORY 221A: Men, Women, and Power in Early Modern Russia, 1500-1800

Social values, gender relations, and social change in an era of rapid change; challenges to established norms by new constructions of deviance (witchcraft, religious reform, and revolt) and new standards of civility; encounters with non-Russians and the construction of national consciousness. Social values as political ethos: patrimonial autocracy and the reality of female rule in the late 17th and 18th century.
Last offered: Winter 2010 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-SI

HISTORY 221B: The 'Woman Question' in Modern Russia (FEMGEN 221B)

Russian radicals believed that the status of women provided the measure of freedom in a society and argued for the extension of rights to women as a basic principle of social progress. The social status and cultural representations of Russian women from the mid-19th century to the present. The arguments and actions of those who fought for women's emancipation in the 19th century, theories and policies of the Bolsheviks, and the reality of women's lives under them. How the status of women today reflects on the measure of freedom in post-Communist Russia.
Last offered: Spring 2014 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender

HISTORY 222: Crime and Punishment in Early Modern Europe and Russia (HISTORY 322A)

Explores criminal law in early modern Europe and Russia, ca 1500-1800, in law and in practice. Engages debates about use of exemplary public executions as tactic of governance, and about gradual decline in "violence" in Europe over this time. Explores practice of accusatory and inquisitory judicial procedures, judicial torture, forms of punishment, concepts of justice.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Kollmann, N. (PI)

HISTORY 223: Art and Ideas in Imperial Russia (HISTORY 323)

Poetry, novels, symphonic music, theater, opera, painting, design, and architecture: what they reveal about the politics and culture of tsarist Russia.
Last offered: Winter 2009 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum
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