2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

91 - 100 of 636 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 73S: History of the Police in the United States: Slave Patrols to Ferguson

How did police come to have the power to use violence? Themes: growth of professional policing, creation of private police forces and vigilantism, and public portrayals of police--by Hollywood and the press. The historical relationship between race and the administration of policing is a central question. Students will hone the methodology necessary to examine primary sources such as police memoirs, court records, police files, detective novels, music videos and photographs. The course fulfills the departmental Sources and Methods requirement. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Last offered: Autumn 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 74: Mexico Since 1876: History of a "Failed State"?

This course is an introduction to the history and diverse peoples of modern Mexico from 1876 to the present. Through lectures, discussions, primary and secondary readings, short documentaries, and written assignments, students will critically explore and analyze the multiplicity of historical processes, events and trends that shaped and were shaped by Mexicans over the course of a century. The course will cover some of the social and political dimensions of rural social change, urbanization and industrialization, technological innovation and misuse, environmental degradation and conservation, education, ideology, culture and media, migration, and the drug trade.

HISTORY 74S: Sounds of the Century: Popular Music and the United States in the 20th Century

What can popular music teach us about the pst? What can we learn about music if we study it historically? This course grapples with these two questions by examining various examples of American music in the 20th century, as well as more conventional historical sources, scholarly books, and essays. Will pay special attention to how issues of race, gender, sexuality, class, and nation were reflected in and produced by people's interactions with music, inside and outside American borders.
Last offered: Spring 2014

HISTORY 76F: CITY, URBANISATION PROCESSES AND URBAN POLICIES IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN (HISTORY 176F)

Note: Course is taught in Spanish. This course is structured around two key concepts: dependence and irregularity in urban development. This course reviews the urbanisation process and urban policies of Latin America and the Caribbean, exploring their consequences and challenges at the intra-urban level in relation to economic, social and cultural processes. Special attention will be paid to the case of Cuba, a socialist country with its own internal dynamics which is currently undergoing a period of transition.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

HISTORY 78: Film and History of Latin American Revolutions and Counterrevolutions (HISTORY 178)

Note: Students who have completed HISTORY 78N or 78Q should not enroll in this course. In this course we will watch and critique films made about Latin America's 20th century revolutions focusing on the Cuban, Chilean and Nicaraguan revolutions. We will analyze the films as both social and political commentaries and as aesthetic and cultural works, alongside archivally-based histories of these revolutions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

HISTORY 78Q: Film and History of Latin American Revolutions and Counterrevolutions

In this course we will watch and critique films made about Latin America's 20th century revolutions focusing on the Mexican, Cuban, Chilean and Nicaraguan revolutions. We will analyze the films as both social and political commentaries and as aesthetic and cultural works, alongside archivally-based histories of these revolutions.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

HISTORY 82C: Making of the Islamic World, 600-1500

(Same as HISTORY 182C. Majors and other taking 5 units, register for 182C.) The History of Islam and Muslim peoples from 600-1500. Topics include Muhammad and his community; the early Arab conquests and empires; sectarian movements; formation of Islamic belief, thought, legal culture and religious institutions; transregional Sufi and learned networks; family and sexuality; urban, rural and nomadic life; non-Muslim communities; the development of Mediterranean and Indian Ocean trade; relations with Byzantium, the Latin West, China; the Crusades and the Mongols.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

HISTORY 83D: Global History of Muslim Peoples (from the Crusades to Modern Times) (HISTORY 183D)

How to make sense of the Muslim World today in a historical perspective from Africa to the Middle East, from Central Asia to India and Southeast Asia? Topics include: the Muslim world as connected but diverse reality; great Muslim Empires and Sunni, Shi`ite and Salafi confessionalisms; Sufis, Merchants, and Nomads; Christians, Jews and Hindus living in the Islamic world; Muslim responses to European dominance; Reforms, revolutions and Islamic Enlightenment; Alternative modernities: Cosmopolitanism, Islamism and Nationalism. Is the Muslim World today in crisis?
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

HISTORY 83S: Refugees of Palestine and Syria: History, Identity, and Politics of Exile in the Middle East

Mass displacements of Palestinians (1948, 1967) and Syrians (2011-) remain crucial to our understanding of history and politics of the modern Middle East. The course topics include the media's role in alleviating or worsening refugee crises, the Palestinian "right of return," and the place of religion in the Syrian civil war. By looking at autobiographies, graffiti, revolutionary posters, and music, we will study the construction of refugee identities, through the prism of race, ethnicity, statelessness, gender, and sexual orientation. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 84N: The American Empire in the Middle East

What have been the traditional objectives of U.S. policy in the Middle East since the end of World War II? What forces shape U.S. policy towards the Middle East? Did those interests and the means employed to pursue them change substantially after the demise of the Soviet Union? What has been the impact of U.S. policy on the region itself? The three principal cases to be examined are Afghanistan, Iraq and Israel/Palestine.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI
Instructors: Beinin, J. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints