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81 - 90 of 636 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 60N: Revolutionaries and Founders

Americans remain fascinated by the revolutionary generation which secured independence and established a national constitutional republic. Books about the founders come steadily from the presses, some describing the lives of individual revolutionaries, others trying to analyze and explain what made these events possible. This seminar will approach the Revolution through both a biographical and analytical framework, relying both on scholarly writings and the massive array of primary sources that are readily available through letterpress editions and on-line. The course will rely on the instructor's own recent book, Revolutionaries: A New History of the Invention of America, which carries the story from the crisis around the Boston Tea Party of 1773 through the end of President Washington's first administration. The course will be divided evenly between modern scholarship and the careful reading of original materials, and students will write short essays that will involve the analysis of explanatory problems, the close interpretation of documents, and the crafting of historical narratives. Topics to be discussed will include the outbreak of the revolution, constitution-making at both the state and national levels of government, the conduct of the war, and the legacies that Americans particularly associate with Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and Alexander Hamilton.
Last offered: Winter 2014 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 61N: The Worlds of Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson assumed many roles during his life¿Founding Father, revolutionary, and author of the Declaration of Independence; natural scientist, inventor, and political theorist; slaveholder, founder of a major political party, and President of the United States. This introductory seminar explores these many worlds of Jefferson, both to understand the multifaceted character of the man and the broader historical contexts that he inhabited and did so much to shape.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Gienapp, J. (PI)

HISTORY 64: Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Modern America (CSRE 64)

How ethnicity influenced the American experience and how prevailing attitudes about racial and ethnic groups over time have affected the historical and contemporary reality of the nation's major minority populations. Focus is on the past two centuries.
Last offered: Winter 2014 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 64E: Acting Free: Assertive Performance in African American History and Cultural Expression (AFRICAAM 64E, AFRICAAM 164E, DANCE 101, HISTORY 164E)

This course will explore the imaginative ways black Americans have expressed their desire for freedom through dance, movement, visual art, and musical performance. Each week, historian Clayborne Carson will discuss the theme of assertive performance during various periods of African American history, and dance Lecturer Aleta Hayes will guide students as they perform their own interpretations through distinctive historical periods and styles. Course will culminate in informal performance by participating students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

HISTORY 66: Introduction to African American History - the Modern Freedom Struggle (AFRICAAM 166, AMSTUD 166, CSRE 166, HISTORY 166)

Using the unique documentary resources and publications of Stanford's Martin Luther King Jr. Research and Education Institute, this course will utilize multi-media materials to shed light on the relationship between grassroots activism and King's visionary leadership.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul
Instructors: Carson, C. (PI)

HISTORY 69: American Environmental History (EARTHSYS 145, HISTORY 169)

This course examines the historical relationship between human beings and nature in the geographical space that became the United States, from earliest settlement to the late twentieth century. Students will be introduced to themes in American Environmental History, including: Native Americans and the environment, ecological changes following European colonization, the impact of industrialization and urbanization, evolving ideas about nature, the rise of conservation and environmentalist movements in the twentieth century, environmental inequality, and the historical roots of today¿s environmental problems.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

HISTORY 69Q: On the Road: A History of Travel in 20th Century America (AMSTUD 109Q)

From Mark Twain's Roughin It to Cheryl Strayed's Wild, this seminar explores epic road trips of the twentieth century. Travel is a cultural practice through which Americans have constructed ideas about the self, society, race, the past, and the future. Engaging historical and literary texts, film, autobiography, photography, and music, we will consider how writers have explored the theme of travel and what the differences in their texts tell us about American writing, American history, and American life.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Hobbs, A. (PI)

HISTORY 70: Culture, Politics, and Society in Latin America

(Same as HISTORY 170B. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in HISTORY 170B.) This course examines Latin American history from the colonial era to the present day. Key issues include colonialism, nationalism, democracy, and revolution. Sources include writings in the social sciences as well as primary documents, fiction, and film.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Selvidge, S. (PI)

HISTORY 71S: American Political Thought from the Civil War to the Cold War

This course explores America's most important political tradition: liberalism. What does liberalism mean? Does it mean something different today than it did in the past? Using multiple textual and visual sources, students will grapple with how Americans remade liberalism in the 19th and 20th centuries and how political thinkers have understood its meaning over time. We will see how American liberalism was shaped by factors of race, gender, and class and by competing ideologies like conservatism and socialism.
Last offered: Winter 2014

HISTORY 73: Mexican Migration to the United States (AMSTUD 73, CHILATST 173, HISTORY 173)

This class examines the history of Mexican migration to the United States. In the United States we constantly hear about Obama¿s immigration plan, the anti-immigrant laws in Arizona, and the courage of DREAM Activists; in Mexico news sources speak about the role of remittances, the effect of deportations, and the loss of life at the border. Unfortunately, few people truly understand the historical trends in these migratory processes, or the multifaceted role played by the United States in encouraging individuals to head there. Moreover, few people have actually heard the opinions and voices of migrants themselves. This course seeks to provide students with the opportunity to place migrants¿ experiences in dialogue with migratory laws as well as the knowledge to embed current understandings of Latin American migration in their meaningful historical context.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
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