2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

361 - 370 of 636 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 289: The Indian Ocean World: Winds, Merchants & Empires (HISTORY 389)

Focuses on the Indian Ocean World, a critical historical arena of large-scale cultural and economic contact among societies of South Asia, the Middle East, East and Southeast Asia, and East Africa. We will explore this contact zone chronologically and thematically, examining the influence of environment, the demands of commerce, the bonds of Islam, and the political tensions of empires from medieval to modern times. We will pay particular attention to the networks and individuals that have made up the social fabric of this oceanic world: merchants, pilgrims, smugglers, and laborers. Texts will include scholarly studies as well as travel and fictional accounts.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 290: North Korea in Historical Perspective (HISTORY 390)

This colloquium will approach North Korea from a longer historical perspective and also discuss the country's current crisis and its future. Themes will include the northern region in colonial Korea, Kim Il Sung and Manchurian guerrillas, the USSR and North Korean Revolution, the reconstruction after the Korean War, Juche ideology and the political system, the everyday life of North Korea people, the Cold War and North Korean diplomacy, culture and mass performance, the great famine and economy in transition, the military and nuclear development, and refugees and the succession of leadership.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Moon, Y. (PI)

HISTORY 290E: Movies and Empire in East Asia (HISTORY 390E)

Cinema was invented in the 1890s and simultaneously introduced to East Asia. This colloquium explores how this new medium changed the cultural and social landscape of East Asia and how the visual power of films also affected the culture politics of empires in the region. The themes include cinema and urban spaces, cultural imperialism, film images and gender discourse, colonial modernity, Americanism and Asianism, the visual and the textual, wartime propaganda, and Hollywood movies and cold war empires.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom
Instructors: Moon, Y. (PI)

HISTORY 291A: Archaeology and Modernity in Asia: The Excavation of Ancient Civilizations in Modern Times (HISTORY 391A)

The interplay in Asia between antiquity and modernity, civilization and nation state, and national versus colonial science. The recent excavation of artifacts and places associated with Asian civilization such as the terracotta warriors in China and Angkor Wat in Cambodia. How Asian states have grappled with modernity and colonialism as they simultaneously dug up their ancient pasts.
Last offered: Spring 2007 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

HISTORY 291E: Maps, Borders, and Conflict in East Asia (HISTORY 391E)

The nature of borders and border conflicts in N.E. Asia from the 17th to the early 20th century. Focus is on contact zones between China, Russia, Korea, and Japan. The geopolitical imperatives that drove states to map their terrain in variable ways. Cultural, diplomatic, and imperial contexts. European pressures and contributions to E. Asian cartography; the uses of maps in surveillance, diplomacy, identity, and war. Student projects focus on a contested border zone.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Wigen, K. (PI)

HISTORY 292F: Culture and Religions in Korean History (HISTORY 392F)

This colloquium explores the major themes of Korean history before 1800 and the role of culture and religions in shaping the everyday life of Chosôn-dynasty Koreans. Themes include the aristocracy and military in the Koryô dynasty, Buddhism and Confucianism in the making of Chosôn Korea, kingship and court culture, slavery and women, family and rituals, death and punishment, and the Korean alphabet (Hangûl) and print culture.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 292J: Sino-Korean Relations, Past and Present (CHINA 156, CHINA 256, KOREA 156, KOREA 256)

Korea and China have long been intertwined in their political, economic, and cultural histories. The depth of this historical relationship has enormous ramifications for East Asia today. This course will investigate the history of Korea-China relations from its deep roots in the ancient past, through its formative periods in the early modern period and the age of imperialism, to the contemporary era. Topics to be covered include formation of Chinese and Korean national identity, Sino-Korean cultural exchange, premodern Chinese empire in East Asia, China and Korea in the wake of Western and Japanese imperialism, communist revolutions in East Asia, the Korean War, and China's relations with a divided Korea in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Particular attention will be paid to how the modern and contemporary ramifications of past historical relations and how contemporary Chinese and Koreans interpret their own and each others' pasts.nThis course will ask students to engage with diverse interpretations of the past and to consider how a common history is interpreted by different audiences and for different purposes. What are the implications of divergent memories of a single historical event for Chinese and Korean political, cultural, and ethnic identities? How are political, cultural, and ethnic identities constructed through engagement with difference? And what is at stake in different constructions of identity?In addressing these issues, students will also engage in social inquiry. They will be asked to understand how political ideology, economic organization, and social forces have shaped the character of Sino-Korean relations. What are the economic and political institutions that influence these relations in each time period? How do ideologies like Confucianism, Communism, or free-market liberalism interface with Chinese and Korean societies and impact their relations?
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Wang, S. (PI)

HISTORY 293B: Queer History in Comparative Perspective (FEMGEN 293B, FEMGEN 393B, HISTORY 393B)

Comparative history of homoerotic desire, relations, and identity through scholarship on different historical periods and parts of the world: the classical Mediterranean, early modern European cities, late imperial and modern China, Tokugawa and modern Japan, and the U.S.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Sommer, M. (PI)

HISTORY 293E: Female Divinities in China (HISTORY 393E, RELIGST 257X, RELIGST 357X)

This course examines the fundamental role of powerful goddesses in Chinese religion. It covers the entire range of imperial history and down to the present. It will look at, among other questions, what roles goddesses played in the spirit world, how this is related to the roles of human women, and why a civilization that excluded women from the public sphere granted them a dominant place, in the religious sphere. It is based entirely on readings in English.
Last offered: Winter 2015

HISTORY 294D: Manchuria: Cradle of Conflict, Cockpit of Asia (HISTORY 394D)

How did Manchuria become Chinese? This course utilizes the dual waves of early twentieth-century writings and a wide array of recent scholarship dealing with Manchuria to explore the formation of nation-states out of the Qing and Japanese empires in Northeast Asia through the lenses of opium, migration, cities, warlords, and memoir. This course will be of interest to students concerned with developing transcultural understandings of Northeast Asian history.
Last offered: Winter 2015
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints