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351 - 360 of 636 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 282: The United States and the Middle East since 1945 (HISTORY 382)

Since the end of WW II, U.S. interests in the Middle East have traditionally been defined as access to oil at a reasonable price, trade and markets, containing the influence of the Soviet Union, and the security of Israel. Is this the full range of U.S. interests? How has the pursuit of these interests changed over time? What forces have shaped U.S. policy? What is the impact of U.S. policy on the region itself?
Last offered: Winter 2011 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom

HISTORY 282C: Women in the Modern Middle East (HISTORY 382C)

Historical changes in factors structuring women's status and sociopolitical roles: the rise of Islam and Muslim orthodoxy; less formal expressions of women's religiosity and sexuality; the integration of the Middle East into the world market and its effects on women's labor; and social movements concerned with women's status. Case studies of women's participation in anti-colonial revolutions. Sources include historical studies, primary texts, fiction, memoirs, and films.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Prakash, A. (PI)

HISTORY 283: The New Global Economy, Oil and Origins of the Arab Spring (HISTORY 383)

This class uses the methods of political economy to study the trajectory of global capitalism from the end of World War II to the current phase of neoliberal globalization. The argument is that the role of oil, and its primary repository " the Middle East " has been central in the global capitalist order and that neoliberalism and the oil economy are closely linked to the eruption of the Arab uprisings of 2011.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

HISTORY 283G: Place, Nature, and Life: Spacetime through Ottoman Texts (HISTORY 383G)

Prerequisite: Reading ability in Ottoman-Turkish and/or Arabic. This course explores how women and men in the early modern Ottoman world (16th to 18th centuries) imagined their physical and spiritual environment, their past and future, their immediate places and far geographies, life and afterlife. The theoretical framework of discussions will be heavily based on Henri Lefebvre's Production of Space and primary readings include various texts in Ottoman-Turkish, such as The Descriptions of Places of Matrakç Nasuh (d.1564) and The Travels of Eviya Çelebi (d.1682). We will also examine the Ottoman-Turkish manuscripts in Green Library.
Terms: Win | Units: 5

HISTORY 284F: Empires, Markets and Networks: Early Modern Islamic World and Beyond, 1500-1800 (HISTORY 384F)

Focuses on political regimes, economic interactions and sociocultural formations in the early modern Balkans and Middle East to Central and South Asia. Topics include complex political systems of the Ottoman, Safavid and Mughal empires; experiences of various Muslim, Christian, Jewish and Hindu, as well as urban, rural and nomadic communities; consolidation of transregional commerce and cultural exchange; incorporation of the Islamic world in the global economy; transimperial networks of the Muslim and Non-Muslim merchants, scholars and sufis.
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

HISTORY 285D: A History of Jews in Russia: An Introduction (JEWISHST 285D)

Since Russia annexed territories formerly belonging to the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and absorbed that region's large Jewish community, Russia has been a center of the Jewish world. Russia's Jews have been a potent force in the Jewish world as they struggled against discrimination, pursued utopian dreams, and devoted themselves to religious, cultural, and political movements. This course will introduce students to the history of Russian Jews, in the hope that they will gain a deeper understanding of this fascinating community.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Meyers, J. (PI)

HISTORY 287C: Zionism and its Critics

Zionism from its genesis in the 1880s up until the establishment of the state of Israel in May, 1948, exploring the historical, ideological and political dimensions of Zionism. Topics include: the emergence of Zionist ideology in connection to and as a response to challenges of modernity; emancipation; Haskalah (Jewish enlightenment); other national and ideological movements of the period; the ideological crystallization of the movement; and the immigration waves to Palestine.
Last offered: Spring 2014 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 287F: Anti-Semitism in the Modern World: An Introduction (JEWISHST 287F)

This course will introduce students to varying forms that anti-Semitism has taken in the modern world. We will be using film, music, imagery, political texts, and scholarly sources to examine regional, cultural, and chronological differences, so that students will better understand the phenomenon. All sources will be available in English.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Meyers, J. (PI)

HISTORY 288: Palestine and the Arab-Israeli Conflict (HISTORY 388, JEWISHST 288, JEWISHST 388)

This course examines some salient issues of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict from the late 19th century to the present. At the end of the course you should be able to articulate the positions of the major parties to the conflict, with the understanding that there is no single, unified Zionist (or Jewish) or Palestinian (or Arab) position. One quarter does not allow sufficient time to cover even all of the important topics comprehensively (for example, the role of the Arab states, the USA and the USSR, and the internal history of Israel receive less attention than is desirable). Some prior knowledge of Middle East history is desirable, but not required. Vigorous debate and criticism are strongly encouraged. Criticism and response expressed in a civil tone is an important way to get a fuller and more truthful picture of something. This is not only a fundamental democratic right and a basic citizenship skill, but it is essential to interpreting information and making good policy. Rights not used are easily lost.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI
Instructors: Beinin, J. (PI)

HISTORY 288D: American Jewish History: Learning to be Jewish in America (AMSTUD 279X, EDUC 279, JEWISHST 297X, RELIGST 279X)

This course will be a seminar in American Jewish History through the lens of education. It will address both the relationship between Jews and American educational systems, as well as the history of Jewish education in America. Plotting the course along these two axes will provide a productive matrix for a focused examination of the American Jewish experience. History students must take course for at least 3 units.
Last offered: Winter 2015
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