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291 - 300 of 636 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 239H: Colonialism and Empire in Modern Europe

To better understand the history of modern Europe within a global context, explores the following questions: What impact did more than a century of colonialism have on the social lives, cultural attitudes, political loyalties, and intellectual world views of European women and men during the nineteenth century? What accounts for the resiliency of empire during a period of rapid global change that witnessed the rise of modern democracy, economic liberalism, ethnic nationalism, and international socialism?
Last offered: Winter 2010 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

HISTORY 239K: Revolutionary Moments in French Thought (FRENCH 128)

French intellectual and political culture has often been associated with revolutionary attempts to break free from the hold of tradition. Indeed, the concept of "revolution" has itself become a French tradition of sorts. Over the last 500 years, these revolutions have taken place in a number of arenas. In philosophy, René Descartes challenged all traditional learning and defined new principles that were central to the so-called ¿Revolution of the Mind.¿ In religion, Enlightenment thinkers not only advocated the toleration of different faiths but also questioned the veracity of Christianity and of all theistic worldviews. In politics, the French Revolution redefined the very concept of a political revolution and set the stage for modern conceptions of sovereignty. French socialist thinkers of the 19th century, in turn, reshaped the ways their contemporaries thought about socio-economic arrangements. Finally, 20th-century existentialists have attempted to rethink the very purpose of human existence. In this course, we will explore these and other seminal revolutionary moments that not only transformed French society, but that also had implications for European and, indeed, global culture. Taught in English, readings in English.
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

HISTORY 241G: Science and Religion in Western History since 1500 (HISTORY 341G)

Contemporary arguments concerning the relationship between science and religion often emphasize their differences, either as incompatible modes of thought in conflict, or as equally valid but "non-overlapping magisterial," which is to say inherently separate domains of inquiry. Such stark distinctions are a relatively recent development. The story of the relationship between science and spiritual belief is one of historically intimate connections and mutual influences. In this class we will examine forms of engagement of scientific and religious ideas in the West from 1500 to the present day.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Daly, J. (PI)

HISTORY 242F: Medicine in an Age of Empires (HISTORY 342F)

This course connects changing ways of understanding the body and disease in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries to the business of empire. How did new ideas and methods of selling medicine relate to the rise of state-sponsored violence, resource extraction, global trade, and enslaved labor? Following black ritual practitioners in the Caribbean, apothecaries in England, and scientists abroad reveals the diversity of medical traditions and knowledge production in the early modern period that formed the basis of modern medicine today.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Dorner, Z. (PI)

HISTORY 243C: People, Plants, and Medicine: Colonial Science and Medicine (HISTORY 343C)

Explores the global exchange of knowledge, technologies, plants, peoples, disease, and medicines. Considers primarily Africans, Amerindians, and Europeans in the eighteenth-century West but also takes examples from other knowledge traditions. Readings treat science and medicine in relation to voyaging, colonialism, slavery, racism, plants, and environmental exchange. Colonial sciences and medicines were important militarily and strategically for positioning emerging nation states in global struggles for land and resources.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 243S: Human Origins: History, Evidence, and Controversy (HISTORY 443A)

Research seminar. Debates and controversies include: theories of human origins; interpretations of fossils, early art, and the oldest tools; the origin and fate of the Neanderthals; evolutionary themes in literature and film; visual rhetoric and cliché in anthropological dioramas and phyletic diagrams; the significance of hunting, gathering, and grandmothering; climatological theories and neocatastrophic geologies; molecular anthropology; the impact of racial theories on human origins discourse. Background in human evolution not required.
Last offered: Winter 2006 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

HISTORY 244: Egyptomania! The Allure of Ancient Egypt Over the Past 3,500 Years (AFRICAAM 87, CLASSICS 87)

Why does Egypt fascinate us? From Napoleon's invasion to Katy Perry's latest music video, we have interpreted ancient Egyptian history and mythology for centuries; in fact, this obsession dates back to the Egyptians themselves. This seminar explores Egyptomania from the Pharaonic period to the 20th century. Topics include: ancient Egypt, Greek historians, medieval Arabic scholars, hieroglyphic decipherment, 19th century travel, 20th century pop culture, and how historians have interpreted this past over the centuries.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Austin, A. (PI)

HISTORY 244C: The History of the Body in Science, Medicine, and Culture (HISTORY 444C)

The human body as a natural and cultural object, historicized. The crosscultural history of the body from the 18th century to the present. Topics include: sciences of sex and race; medical discovery of particular body parts; human experimentation, foot binding, veiling, and other bodily coverings; thinness and obesity; notions of the body politic.
Last offered: Spring 2007 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender

HISTORY 244F: Beyond Pink and Blue: Gender in Tech (FEMGEN 344F, HISTORY 344F)

This d-school seminar prototypes concepts and methods for "inclusive" design. From the moment we arrive on the planet, gender shapes our perception of the world. Examples of products (including objects, services, and systems) gone awry will serve as prompts for design activities, challenges, and discussions on gender issues to illustrate the different needs of women, men, and gender-fluid people. Class sessions mix use case explorations with design methodology, design thinking abilities, and guest speakers from technology, design, and academia. Students will be asked to work in interdisciplinary teams on several design challenges, culminating in the development of a toolkit for inclusive design. Methods will interact in crucial ways to create "intersectional thinking" (i.e., to consider how gender, ethnicity, sexuality, socio-economic status, etc. work together to require new solutions in design). Topics include: algorithms, media, seat belts for pregnant women, robotics, assistive technologies, tech for developing worlds, video games, urban/rural design, software development, and many more.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5

HISTORY 245G: Law and Colonialism in Africa (HISTORY 348D)

Law in colonial Africa provides an opportunity to examine the meanings of social, cultural, and economic change in the anthropological, legal, and historical approaches. Court cases as a new frontier for the social history of Africa. Topics: meanings of conflicts over marriage, divorce, inheritance, property, and authority.
Last offered: Autumn 2012 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
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