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281 - 290 of 636 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 236F: The End of the World As They Knew It: Culture, Caf├ęs, and Crisis in Europe, 1880-1918 (HISTORY 336F)

The years stretching from roughly 1880 to end of the First World War were marked by profound social upheaval and an intense burst of creativity. This seminar will focus on the major cultural movements and big ideas of the period. Topics covered include the rise of mass culture and cinema, the origins of psychoanalysis, anti-Semitism and Zionism, new anxieties about sexuality and the ¿New Woman,¿ anarchism, decadence, degeneration, and Dada ¿ with cameos from Bernhardt, Freud, Klimt, Nietzsche, Toulouse-Lautrec, Wilde, Zola, and other luminaries of the age.
Last offered: Winter 2015

HISTORY 237D: The French Revolution and the Birth of Modern Politics (HISTORY 337D)

(Students who have taken HISTORY 134 should not enroll in this course.) This course will focus on the birth of modern politics in the French Revolution. The goal will be to understand the structural contradictions of the French monarchy in the pre-revolutionary period, the reasons for the monarchy's failure to resolve those contradictions, and the political dynamic unleashed as they were solved by the revolutionary action of 1789. Sovereignty, democracy, rights, representation, and terror will be principal themes. Lectures will be combined with close reading and discussions of political and philosophical writings of the period.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Baker, K. (PI)

HISTORY 237F: 20th Century British History through the Hoover Archives (HISTORY 337F)

From the rich resources of the Hoover Institution, the students in this course will select a particular archive (war posters, politician, spy, literary figure, diplomat, etc. etc.) to investigate, to write about,discuss in class, and, it is hoped, present in an exhibition at the Hoover, learning museum skills along the way as well as the history of Britain in the 20th century.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 237K: Speed and Power: Travel and Travel Writing in the 20th Century (FRENCH 237K, HISTORY 337K, URBANST 155)

Every story is in some ways a travel story, a journey from here to there. In this seminar we'll explore how different people in different times and places experimented with the travel-story form to make sense of their social worlds. We'll focus on the twentieth century, during which people, images, and ideas moved around the world at an unprecedented scale and with increasing speed. Some journeys take us across oceans, while others are limited to just a few city blocks. For a final project students may complete a standard research paper related to themes of the course, or may produce their own travel narrative, however they choose to interpret this rubric. nSPECIAL GUEST LECTURER: Pico Iyer, travel writer.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Braude, M. (PI)

HISTORY 238: France Since 1900: Politics, Culture, Society (FRENCH 259, FRENCH 359, HISTORY 338)

This course explores how France experienced some of the most tumultuous episodes in modern history, including world wars, collaboration and genocide, wars of decolonization, globalization, immigration, and economic decline. Our sources will include a rich combination of novels, films, architecture, and memoirs, including many classics of their chosen genres.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Daughton, J. (PI)

HISTORY 238G: Ethnography of the Late Middle Ages: Social history and popular culture in the age of the plague (HISTORY 338G)

During the late Middle Ages, as Europe was recovering from the devastation of the Black Death, political reorganization contributed to a burst of archival documentation that allows historians richly detailed glimpses of societies in transition. We will be reading selected scholarly articles and monographs covering such topics as persecution, prechristian cultural remnants, folk theologies, festival cultures, peasant revolts, heresy, and the advent of the diabolic witch.
Last offered: Winter 2015

HISTORY 238J: The European Scramble for Africa: Origins and Debates

Why and how did Europeans claim control of 70% of African in the late nineteenth century? Students will engage with historiographical debates ranging from the national (e.g. British) to the topical (e.g. international law). Students will interrogate some of the primary sources on which debaters have rested their arguments. Key discussions include: the British occupation of Egypt; the autonomy of French colonial policy; the mystery of Germany¿s colonial entry; and, not least, the notorious Berlin Conference of 1884-1885.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Press, S. (PI)

HISTORY 239E: Paris: The Making of a Modern Icon (FRENCH 227, URBANST 142)

Few places have been as heavily romanticized and mythologized as Paris. To many observers, Paris and its attractions serve as icons of modernity itself. By engaging with fiction, film, journalism, painting, photography, poetry, song, and other media, we¿ll trace how different people at different times have used Paris as both backdrop and main protagonist, and we'll consider how the city itself has incorporated and rebelled against such representations. The scope of our inquiry will stretch from the late 18th century to the present, covering a host of topics, figures, and sites: from the French Revolution to the protests of May '68, from Baudelaire to Hemingway, from the Impressionists to the Situationists. Taught in English
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

HISTORY 239F: Empire and Information (HISTORY 339F)

How do states see? How do they know what they know about their subjects, citizens, economies, and geographies? How does that knowledge shape society, politics, identity, freedom, and modernity? Focus is on the British imperial state activities in S. Asia and Britain: surveillance technologies and information-gathering systems, including mapping, statistics, cultural schemata, and intelligence systems, to render geographies and social bodies legible, visible, and governable.
Last offered: Autumn 2005 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom | Repeatable for credit

HISTORY 239G: The Algerian Wars (CSRE 249, FRENCH 249)

This course offers to study the Algerian Wars since the French conquest of Algeria (1830-1847) to the Algerian civil war of the 1990s. We will revisit the ways in which the wars have been narrated in historical and political discourse, and in literature. A special focus will be given to the Algerian War of Independence (1954-1962). The course considers the continuing legacies surrounding this traumatic conflict in France and Algeria and the delicate re-negotiation of the French nation-state that resulted. A key focus will be on the transmission of collective memory through transnational lenses. We will examine how the French and Algerian states, but also civil societies (Pieds-Noirs, Arabs, Kabyles, Jews, veterans, Harkis, "suitcase carriers") have instrumentalized the memories of the war for various ends, through analyses of commemorative events and monuments. Readings from Alexis de Tocqueville, Albert Camus, Frantz Fanon, Mouloud Feraoun, Rachid Mimouni, Wassyla Tamzali, Germaine Tillion, Pierre Nora, Benjamin Stora, Todd Shepard, Sarah Stein, Pierre Vidal-Naquet, James Lesueur. Movies include "The Battle of Algiers," "Indigènes," and "Viva Laldjérie." Taught in French.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Ulloa, M. (PI)
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