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271 - 280 of 636 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 233K: The Invention of the Modern Republic (HISTORY 333K)

Examines the history of republican thinking in the Atlantic World from the Renaissance to the French Revolution.
Last offered: Spring 2010

HISTORY 234: The Enlightenment (DLCL 324, FRENCH 244, HISTORY 334, HISTORY 432A, HUMNTIES 324)

The Enlightenment as a philosophical, literary, and political movement. Themes include the nature and limits of philosophy, the grounds for critical intellectual engagement, the institution of society and the public, and freedom, equality and human progress. Authors include Voltaire, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Hume, Diderot, and Condorcet.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

HISTORY 234G: Literature and Empire (ENGLISH 234G, HISTORY 334G)

This course will explore the relationship between modern British literature and imperialism. We will attend to the way imperialism shaped the evolution of a range of styles and genres, from romantic to gothic to modern, epistolary to mystery to fantasy. We will read works by authors such as Charlotte Bronte, Rudyard Kipling, Joseph Conrad, E. M. Forster, complementing them with key works of literary criticism.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Satia, P. (PI)

HISTORY 235: The Renaissance of War: Politics, Technology, and War in Late Medieval and Renaissance Italy

The dynamic societies of the Italian Peninsula of the 14th to 16th centuries "prosperous, astonishingly creative, politically fractious, and endemically violent" produced sweeping, deeply consequential changes. Among these were new developments in the theory and practice of war, politics, and diplomacy that laid the foundations for the modern state system and European military power. The class covers: new diplomatic practice; the Military Revolution; state-building; war finance; court culture; and the intersection of these with the shimmering brilliance of Renaissance culture.
Last offered: Spring 2015

HISTORY 235C: Readings in the Supernatural (HISTORY 335C)

Class will read and discuss a selection of monographs, scholarly essays, and primary sources on the rich supernatural world of early modern Europe. We will discuss how fairies, werewolves, nightmares, and trolls all became witches, how the binary of angels and demons figured in European thought, and how the marginalized imaginary was reconstituted in theatre and fiction.
Last offered: Autumn 2014

HISTORY 235F: Camus (CSRE 129, FRENCH 129)

"The Don Draper of Existentialism" for Adam Gopnik, "the ideal husband of contemporary letters" for Susan Sontag, and "the admirable conjunction of a man, of an action, and of a work" for Sartre, Camus embodies the very French figure of the "intellectuel engagé," or public intellectual. From his birth in 1913 into a poor family in Algeria to the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1957, from Saint Germain-des-Prés to his predilection for the mediterranean culture, Camus captured the quest for universalism, for the politics of justice, and engaged in the great ethical battles of his time, from the fight against nazism and communism, from questioning colonial rules to the haunting Algerian War, and his complex "silence" over the war. Camus the Algerian, Camus the moralist, Camus the Resistant: through readings and films, we will explore his multiple, long-lasting legacies. Readings from Albert Camus, Kamel Daoud, Mouloud Feraoun, Alice Kaplan, Orhan Pamuk, A.B. Yehoshua, Assia Djebar, Jean-Paul Sartre, Yasmina Khadra. Movies include "The Stranger," and "Far from Men." This course is a gateway for French Studies, with special emphasis on oral proficiency. Taught in French.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Ulloa, M. (PI)

HISTORY 235G: Famous French Figures: Celebrity and the Making of French Identity (FRENCH 209, HISTORY 335G)

How do we think historically about something as fleeting as fame? In this seminar we¿ll engage with the biographies of eight famous French figures, exploring how each of these celebrated lives influenced popular perceptions of what it has meant to be French over the past two centuries. Questions we will ask include: How and why are public figures remembered and memorialized differently at different times and in different places? Who does and does not qualify for the role of French celebrity, and why? What work must biographers do to frame something as complex as a human life into a coherent narrative? What is gained and lost in approaching a given era through a close examination of one individual? Most central to this course: How do people create and contest their cultural and national identities through the collective celebration of particular individuals? We will study the lives and times of three men and five women: Marie Antoinette, Napoleon Bonaparte, Edouard Manet, Sarah Bernhardt, Josephine Baker, Coco Chanel, Albert Camus, and Francoise Sagan.
Last offered: Spring 2016

HISTORY 236: The Ethics of Imperialism

Can a commitment to liberty, progress, and universal rights be reconciled with imperialism? The ethical underpinnings of empire; how modern Europeans provided ethical and political justifications for colonial expansion. How European ideals were used to defend and justify inequality, violence, and genocide. The ethics of American-driven globalization and humanitarianism. Texts include primary sources, philosophical treatises, and historical studies.
Last offered: Autumn 2007 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

HISTORY 236B: Hobbes to Habermas: The Idea of Society in Modern Thought (HISTORY 336B)

Classic texts in social theory from the seventeenth century to the present. Readings include Locke, Smith, Hegel, Comte, and Durkheim, and Weber.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

HISTORY 236E: Planes, Trains, and Automobiles: Transportation, Tourism, and the Making of Modern Europe (FRENCH 217)

This course traces a history of how over the past two centuries various innovations in transportation technologies have shaped so much of how our world works: from how we eat, to how we relax, to how we dream, to the houses we live in, to how our financial systems work, and to how new ideas spread.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Braude, M. (PI)
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