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231 - 240 of 636 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 208S: Facing the Past: The Politics of Retrospective Justice

Forms of injustice in history including slavery, genocide, ethnic cleansing, mass rape, forced religious conversion, and torture of prisoners. Mechanisms developed over the last century to define, deter, and alleviate the effects of such offenses, including war crimes tribunals, truth commissions, national apologies, and monetary reparations. Case studies chart the international field of retrospective justice, exploring the legal, political, and moral implications of confronting traumatic pasts.
Last offered: Autumn 2010 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

HISTORY 209B: The Idea of Politics (HISTORY 309B)

Can we live without politics? Is politics indispensable for humanity and vice-versa? The idea of politics is that it must transform, through human action, conditions of collective life. But the 20th century produced colliding beliefs about what that life might be and what the human being itself might look like. Explore whether, after the century, we might still think of politics as an ethical idea and the "human" as foundational political category. Keywords: Civility, Cruelty, Friendship, Empire, Democracy, Humanism, Animals.

HISTORY 209D: Postcolonialism and Universalism (HISTORY 309A)

Key texts and motifs from postcolonial theory: empire, class, exile, suffering, textuality, archive in juxtaposition to 20th-century philosophical questions about universal history and the relevance of humanist inquiry.
Last offered: Winter 2011

HISTORY 209S: Research Seminar for Majors

Required of History majors. How to conduct original, historical research and analysis, including methods such as using the libraries and archives at Stanford and elsewhere, and working collaboratively to frame topics, identify sources, and develop analyses. Autumn quarter focuses on 20th Century and History of Science; Winter quarter on Colonialism, culture/politics in modern Europe, and Europe before the 1500s; Spring quarter on travel and geographies.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5

HISTORY 211: Out of Eden: Deportation, Exile, and Expulsion from Antiquity to the Renaissance (HISTORY 311)

This course examines the long pedigree of modern deportations and mass expulsions, from the forced resettlements of the ancient world to the expulsion of Jews from Spain in 1492, and from the outlawry of Saga-era Iceland to the culture of civic exile in Renaissance Italy. The course focuses on Europe and the Mediterranean from antiquity to the early modern period, but students are welcome to venture beyond these geographical and chronological boundaries for their final papers.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Dorin, R. (PI)

HISTORY 212: Knights, Monks, and Nobles: Masculinity in the Middle Ages (FEMGEN 212X, FEMGEN 312, HISTORY 312, RELIGST 212X, RELIGST 312X)

This course considers masculinity as historically and culturally contingent, focusing on the experiences and representations of medieval men as heroes, eunuchs, fathers, priests, husbands, boys, and fighting men. Recognizing that the lives of men, like those of women, were governed by gendered rules and expectations, we will explore a wide range of medieval masculinities, paying close attention to the processes by which manhood could be achieved (e.g. martial, spiritual, sexual), and to competing versions of manliness, from the warrior hero of the early middle ages to the suffering Christ of late medieval religion.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 214D: Mediterranean Crossroads: Power, Culture, and Religion in Medieval Sicily (HISTORY 314D)

Sicily in the Middle Ages was a Mediterranean crossroads, a dynamic and diverse kingdom in which Muslim and Christian, Viking and African, European and Eastern Cultures all came together. Explores the life and times of Frederick II (1194-1250). He claimed universal authority as a Christian emperor, yet ruled multireligious Sicily as king. He promoted crusading, yet was accused of being a heretic and a crypto Muslim. He spoke six languages and actively patronized the arts and sciences. Topics include: structures and influences that made such a figure possible; how he managed the tensions of governing a diverse and disparate empire; how religion and cultural production created and maintained his authority; how contemporaries and later generations reacted to this enigmatic emperor; why has he continued to generate such polarizing reactions; and how did Frederick become a figure revered by Nazis and multiculturalists alike.
Last offered: Spring 2014

HISTORY 214G: Revolutions from Ancient Greece to the Arab Spring (DLCL 127, FRENCH 147)

This course looks at theories of revolution and political or social change from ancient Greece to the Arab Spring. The course will provide a close reading of a selection of texts from ancient Greek political writing (Plato, Aristotle), medieval and early modern political advice literature (Marsilius of Padua, Machiavelli), and modern political thought (Tocqueville). Later sections of the course look at how the insights derived from the history of political thought can help generate a new framework for the study of modern revolutions, such as the Iranian Revolution and the Arab Spring. INSTRUCTOR: Vasileios Syros Note: Instructor has submitted WTWD for Social Inquiry (SI) and Ethical Reasoning (ER).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER

HISTORY 215: Saints and Sinners: Women and Religion in the Medieval World (FEMGEN 215, HISTORY 315A, RELIGST 215X)

Although the Apostle Paul taught that "There is neither Jew nor Greek, slave nor free, male nor female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus" (Gal. 3:28), men and women experienced medieval Christianity in ways that were often vastly different. In this course we examine the religious experiences of women from the origins of Christianity through to the end of the medieval period, with particular attention paid to female prophets and religious authority, saints and martyrs, sexuality and virginity, literacy and education within the cloister, mysticism, relations between religious women and men, and the relevance of gender in the religious life -- especially as gender intersected with fears of heresy, sin, and embodiment.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 216: Women and the Book: Scribes, Artists, and Readers from Late Antiquity through the Fourteenth Century (ARTHIST 206H, FEMGEN 216, HISTORY 316)

This course examines the cultural worlds of medieval women through particular attention to the books that they owned, commissioned, and created. Beginning with the earliest Christian centuries, the course proceeds chronologically, charting women¿s book ownership, scribal and artistic activity, and patronage from Late Antiquity through the fourteenth century. In addition to examining specific manuscripts (in facsimile, or digitally), we will consider ancillary questions to do with women¿s authorship, education and literacy, reading patterns, devotional practices, and visual traditions and representation.
Last offered: Winter 2015
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