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171 - 180 of 636 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 156G: Women and Medicine in US History: Women as Patients, Healers and Doctors (AMSTUD 156H, FEMGEN 156H)

Women's bodies in sickness and health, and encounters with lay and professional healers from the 18th century to the present. Historical consttruction of thought about women's bodies and physical limitations; sexuality; birth control and abortion; childbirth; adulthood; and menopause and aging. Women as healers, including midwives, lay physicians, the medical profession, and nursing.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Horn, M. (PI)

HISTORY 157: The Constitution: A Brief History (AMSTUD 157, POLISCI 128S)

A broad survey of the Constitution, from its Revolutionary origins to the contemporary disputes over interpretation. Topics include the invention of the written constitution and interpretative canons; the origins of judicial review; the Civil War and Reconstruction as constitutional crises; the era of substantive due process; the rights revolution; and the Constitution in wartime.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul

HISTORY 158C: History of Higher Education in the U.S. (AMSTUD 165, EDUC 165, EDUC 265)

Major periods of evolution, particularly since the mid-19th century. Premise: insights into contemporary higher education can be obtained through its antecedents, particularly regarding issues of governance, mission, access, curriculum, and the changing organization of colleges and universities.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Labaree, D. (PI)

HISTORY 161: Women in Modern America (AMSTUD 161, CSRE 162, FEMGEN 161)

This course explores the transition from Victorian to modern womanhood in the U.S. from the 1890s to the end of the 20th century, including the experiences of Native, European, African, Mexican, and Asian American women. It asks how, when, and why the majority of American women become wage earners, gained full citizenship, and enacted political opportunities; how race- and class-specific ideals of womanhood changed in popular culture; and how women have redefined their reproductive and sexual relations.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 163: A History of North American Wests

The history, peoples, and natural systems of a region that has never been contained within a single empire or nation state, but has been united by the movement of peoples, species, and things. Topics include smallpox, horses, gold, salmon, rivers, coal, and oil.
Last offered: Spring 2009 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

HISTORY 164C: From Freedom to Freedom Now: African American History, 1865-1965 (AMSTUD 164C)

(Same as HISTORY 64C. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 164C.) Explores the working lives, social worlds, political ideologies and cultural expressions of African Americans from emancipation to the early civil rights era. Topics include: the transition from slavery to freedom, family life, work, culture, leisure patterns, resistance, migration and social activism. Draws largely on primary sources including autobiographies, memoirs, letters, personal journals, newspaper articles, pamphlets, speeches, literature, film and music.
Last offered: Spring 2011 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul

HISTORY 164E: Acting Free: Assertive Performance in African American History and Cultural Expression (AFRICAAM 64E, AFRICAAM 164E, DANCE 101, HISTORY 64E)

This course will explore the imaginative ways black Americans have expressed their desire for freedom through dance, movement, visual art, and musical performance. Each week, historian Clayborne Carson will discuss the theme of assertive performance during various periods of African American history, and dance Lecturer Aleta Hayes will guide students as they perform their own interpretations through distinctive historical periods and styles. Course will culminate in informal performance by participating students.
Terms: Win | Units: 5

HISTORY 166: Introduction to African American History - the Modern Freedom Struggle (AFRICAAM 166, AMSTUD 166, CSRE 166, HISTORY 66)

Using the unique documentary resources and publications of Stanford's Martin Luther King Jr. Research and Education Institute, this course will utilize multi-media materials to shed light on the relationship between grassroots activism and King's visionary leadership.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul

HISTORY 166B: Immigration Debates in America, Past and Present (CSRE 166B, HISTORY 366B)

Examines the ways in which the immigration of people from around the world and migration within the United States shaped American nation-building and ideas about national identity in the twentieth century. Focuses on how conflicting ideas about race, gender, ethnicity, and citizenship with respect to particular groups led to policies both of exclusion and integration. Part One begins with the ways in which the American views of race and citizenship in the colonial period through the post-Reconstruction Era led to the passage of the Chinese Exclusion Act in 1882 and subsequently to broader exclusions of immigrants from other parts of Asia, Southern and Eastern Europe, and Mexico. Explores how World War II and the Cold War challenged racial ideologies and led to policies of increasing liberalization culminating in the passage of the 1965 Immigration Act, which eliminated quotas based on national origins and opened the door for new waves of immigrants, especially from Asia and Latin America. Part Two considers new immigration patterns after 1965, including those of refugees, and investigates the contemporary debate over immigration and immigration policy in the post 9/11 era as well as inequalities within the system and the impact of foreign policy on exclusions and inclusions.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 166C: The Cold War: An International History (INTNLREL 154)

Though it ended twenty years ago, we still live in a world shaped by the Cold War. Beginning with its origins in the mid-1940s, this course will trace the evolution of the global struggle, until its culmination at the end of the 1980s. Students will be asked to ponder the fundamental nature of the Cold War, what kept it alive for nearly fifty years, how it ended, and its long term legacy for the world.
| UG Reqs: WAY-SI
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