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161 - 170 of 636 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 151: The American West (AMSTUD 124A, ARTHIST 152, ENGLISH 124, POLISCI 124A)

The American West is characterized by frontier mythology, vast distances, marked aridity, and unique political and economic characteristics. This course integrates several disciplinary perspectives into a comprehensive examination of Western North America: its history, physical geography, climate, literature, art, film, institutions, politics, demography, economy, and continuing policy challenges. Students examine themes fundamental to understanding the region: time, space, water, peoples, and boom and bust cycles.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

HISTORY 151D: The Age of the City in Nineteenth Century America

Ranging from New York to New Orleans to San Francisco and beyond, this course explores urban life as a lens into broader historical change during the long nineteenth century, when America tripled in size, fought a bloody Civil War, and became an industrial powerhouse. Baseball stadiums, ethnic and "bohemian" enclaves, skyscrapers, settlement houses, parks, and community festivals will help us analyze large-scale phenomena such as war, economic depression, industrial capitalism, slavery and Jim Crow, and the advent of consumer culture.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Milner, G. (PI)

HISTORY 151G: American Legal History, 1930- 2000: New Deal, Rights Revolution, Conservative Reaction (HISTORY 51G)

This course examines major transformations in American law brought about by the momentous social and political movements of the mid- to late 20th Century: Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal and its expansion after World War II; the "Rights Revolution" of 1954-75 that granted new rights to equality and protection from arbitrary treatment to blacks, women, aliens, criminal defendants and others; and finally the fierce political reaction to liberal policies in which the modern conservative movements arose and came to power.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Gordon, R. (PI)

HISTORY 152: History of American Law (HISTORY 352B)

(Formerly Law 318. Now Law 3504.) This course examines the growth and development of American legal institutions with particular attention to crime and punishment, slavery and race relations, the role of law in developing the economy, and the place of lawyers in American society, from colonial times to the present. Special Instructions: Any student may write a paper in lieu of the final exam with consent of instructor. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Final exam or paper. Automatic grading penalty waived for writers. Cross-listed with History ( HISTORY 152 Consent of instructor required) & ( HISTORY 352B).
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Friedman, L. (PI)

HISTORY 152E: From Gold Rush to Google Bus: History of San Francisco (AMSTUD 150X, URBANST 150)

This class will examine the history of San Francisco from Native American and colonial settlement through the present. Focus is on social, environmental, and political history, with the theme of power in the city. Topics include Native Americans, the Gold Rush, immigration and nativism, railroads and robber barons, earthquake and fire, progressive reform and unionism, gender, race and civil rights, sexuality and politics, counterculture, redevelopment and gentrification. Students write final project in collaboration with ShapingSF, a participatory community history project documenting and archiving overlooked stories and memories of San Francisco. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Kahan, M. (PI)

HISTORY 153: CREATION OF THE CONSTITUTION

(Same as LAW 230.) The course begins with readings setting forth the intellectual and experiential background of the framing, including common law and natural rights theory, republicanism, economic & political scientific ideas, and colonial and post-Independence experience. We then study large parts of the debates at the Constitutional Convention, primarily using Madison's Notes. Next come the ratification debates, including readings from antifederalist writers, about half of The Federalist, and overviews of the Virginia and New York ratification conventions. We conclude with the addition of the Bill of Rights. Classes consist of a combination of lecture and extensive participation by students. Elements used in grading: Exam.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5

HISTORY 154: American Intellectual and Cultural History to the Civil War (AMSTUD 154)

(Same as HISTORY 54. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 154.) How Americans considered problems such as slavery, imperialism, and sectionalism. Topics include: the political legacies of revolution; biological ideas of race; the Second Great Awakening; science before Darwin; reform movements and utopianism; the rise of abolitionism and proslavery thought; phrenology and theories of human sexuality; and varieties of feminism. Sources include texts and images.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

HISTORY 154D: Religion and War in America (AMSTUD 105R, CSRE 105, HISTORY 354D, RELIGST 105)

Scholars have devoted much attention to wars in American history, but have not agreed as to whether religion was a major cause or simply a cover for political, economic, and other motives. We will compare interpretations that leave religion out, with those that take it into account. We will also look at the impact of war on the religious lives of ordinary Americans. We will examine both secondary as well as primary sources, beginning with King Philip's War in the 17th century, and ending with the "War on Terror" in the present day.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum
Instructors: Lum, K. (PI)

HISTORY 155: American Constitutional History from the Civil War to the War on Poverty

(Same as LAW 738.) American Constitutional History from the Civil War to the Cold War. This course will address U.S. constitutional history from the post-Civil War Reconstruction period through the mid-20th century. Because of the breadth of the subject matter, the view will necessarily be partial. In particular we will take as our focus the way the Constitution has provided a point of political mobilization for social movements challenging economic and social inequality. Topics covered include: Civil War Reconstruction and restoration; the rise of corporate capitalism and efforts to constrain it; Progressive Era regulation; the New Deal challenge to federalism and the anti-New Deal backlash; government spending; the World Wars and emergency powers; Civil Liberties including speech and privacy; and the beginning of the Civil Rights Era. Readings will include both legal and historical materials with a focus on the relationship between law and society. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Written Assignments, Final Paper. Paper extensions will be granted with instructor permission. No automatic grading penalty for late papers.
Last offered: Spring 2016

HISTORY 156: American Economic History (AMSTUD 116, ECON 116)

The American economy from colonial times to the present, illustrating the role of history in economic life. Topics: U.S. economic development in global and comparative context; slavery as an economic system; emergence of American technology and business organization; economics of the Great Depression and the New Deal; post-World War II economic performance and social change; globalization, information technology, and inequality. Prerequisite: 1 or 1V.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-SI
Instructors: Wright, G. (PI)
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