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11 - 20 of 636 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 4N: A World History of Genocide (JEWISHST 4N)

Reviews the history of genocide from ancient times until the present. Defines genocide, both in legal and historical terms, and investigates its causes, consequences, and global dimensions. Issues of prevention, punishment, and interdiction. Main periods of concern are the ancient world, Spanish colonial conquest; early modern Asia; settler genocides in America, Australia, and Africa; the Armenian genocide and the Holocaust; genocide in communist societies; and late 20th century genocide.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 5A: History of Information: From Moveable Type to Machine Learning (HISTORY 105A)

Students who have taken HISTORY 205A/305A should not enroll in this course. Information has a history-- and it's not the one we've been told by Silicon Valley. In a series of propulsive, empirically rich, and provocative lectures and discussions, this course deep-dives into the history of information and IT, including moveable type, telegraphy, typewriting, personal computing, gaming, social media, algorithms, machine learning, Digital Humanities, and more. You will leave the course with entirely new perspectives on information, including how IT shapes-- and is shaped by-- culture, nationality, gender, ethnicity, economy, and environment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

HISTORY 5C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (CSRE 5C, EMED 5C, FEMGEN 5C, HUMBIO 178T)

(Same as History 105C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 5S: Comparative Partitions: Pakistan, Israel, and the Modern World (FEMGEN 5S)

Modern maps of the world simplify history by portraying the partitioning of territory as adding another border to a map, a naturalized action in the histories of sovereignty. The partitions of India and Palestine in 1947 and 1948 involved division of territory, but were also influenced by international commitments to secure representation for religious minorities. This course focuses on the key global discussions deployed by Indian Muslims and European Jews to understand the nature of their demands for a nation and determine the historical situations that resulted in the creation of sovereign nations. These partitions demonstrate how events, people, geographies, histories and ideas are powerfully linked on a global scale.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Akhter, M. (PI)

HISTORY 6Q: Fairy Spotting: A Practicum in Historical Inquiry

A guided mini-research inquiry into the fae and related historical phenomena: stories about and beliefs in non-human, sentient beings with a separate society and different physical reality.

HISTORY 6W: Service-Learning Workshop on Human Trafficking (FEMGEN 6W)

Considers purpose, practice, and ethics of service learning. Provides training for students' work in community. Examines current scope of human trafficking in Bay Area, pressing concerns, capacity and obstacles to effectively address them. Students work with community partners dedicated to confronting human trafficking and problems it entails on a daily basis. Must currently be enrolled in or have previously taken History 5C/105C ( FemGen 5C/105C, HumBio 178H, IR 105C, CSRE 5C/105C). (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 7E: Islamic Routes: Archaeology and Heritage of Muslim Societies (ANTHRO 13A, ARCHLGY 13, HISTORY 107E)

How has archaeology changed our knowledge of the spread of Islam and past Muslim societies? How does archaeology shape heritage debates, conflicts and ideas about Islam today? Topics include the city and urban change, secular and religious life, gender, economy, and globalization. These topics are explored using archaeological and critical heritage approaches. Focus is on examples drawn from Syria-Palestine, Egypt, Iraq, Arabian Peninsula, India, and Africa. Sources include archaeological data and material culture, historical texts in translation, and photography.
Last offered: Autumn 2014

HISTORY 7G: Making Anglo-American Capitalism (HISTORY 107G)

This course addresses capitalism in global perspective to identify the roots of our current economic system. We will consider theories about capitalism, the politics and policies of implementation, and the human and environmental consequences through topics such as the imperial political economy, consumerism, plantation economies, the East India Company, and the rise of credit. Embedding markets in a range of social relations, cultural practices, and institutional arrangements, reveals how capital became an -ism in specific and knowable historical circumstances.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Dorner, Z. (PI)

HISTORY 7N: Humanitarianism and Its Histories

This seminar will explore when and under what circumstances humanitarian sensibilities, including the idea of human rights, became powerful components of modern politics and ethical thinking. Far from being a straightforward ideology, humanitarianism has been invoked in myriad ways ¿ both idealistically and cynically ¿ in the course of modern history, in debates over phenomena as varied as slavery, colonialism, world war, genocide, famine, and immigration. As a result, contemporary ethical motivations for assisting those in need remain deeply shaded by humanitarianism¿s long engagement with political categories, ideologies, and practices of the past, including Christianity, race, liberalism, capitalism, and imperialism. We will examine the shifting narratives and media strategies that activists, NGOs, and governments have employed to draw widespread attention to crises and abuses from the late eighteenth century to the present.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Daughton, J. (PI)

HISTORY 7W: Service-Learning Workshop on Human Trafficking Part II (FEMGEN 7W)

Prerequisite: HISTORY6W ( FEMGEN 6W). Continuation of HISTORY 6W ( FEMGEN 6W). Students will continue working on their projects with their community partners. Several class meetings and small group consultations throughout the quarter. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)
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