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81 - 90 of 94 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 364: History of Prisons and Immigration Detention (AMSTUD 264, CSRE 264, HISTORY 264)

This course will explore the history of the growing prison and immigration detention systems in the United States. They will pay particular attention to how they developed and how they affect different populations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5

HISTORY 369F: Modern American History: From Civil Rights to Human Rights (HISTORY 269F)

( History 269F is an undergraduate course offered for 5 units; History 369F is a graduate course offered for 4-5 units.) This focuses on American social justice movements during the years since the passage of landmark civil rights legislation during the 1960s, with particular emphasis on efforts to extend rights to all people.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Carson, C. (PI)

HISTORY 371: Graduate Colloquium: Explorations in Latin American History and Historiography (ILAC 371)

Introduction to modern Latin American history and historiography, including how to read and use primary sources for independent research.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Wolfe, M. (PI)

HISTORY 380B: The Birth of Islam: Authority, Community, and Resistance (GLOBAL 134, GLOBAL 234, HISTORY 280B)

This course explores the historical problem of how authority and community (in both the political and religious sense) were defined and challenged in the early Islamic period. Chronological topics covered include: the political, cultural, and religious world of Late Antiquity into which Muhammad was born; the crystallization of a small community of believers who supported Muhammad's message of radical monotheism and aided him in the conquest and conversion of the Arabian Peninsula; the problems of legacy and leadership in the community of the faithful after Muhammad's death; the Arabo-Islamic conquests beyond Arabia during the 7th and early 8th centuries and the establishment of the first Islamic empire under the rule of the Umayyad clan; the Sunni/Shi'a split (and further splits in Shi'ism); the revolution of 750 A.D. and overthrow of the Umayyads by the 'Abbasids; the flourishing of a sophisticated world of learning and culture under the 'Abbasids; and the waning of the 'Abbasids empire in the tenth century and political reconfiguration of the Islamic lands.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Izzo, J. (PI)

HISTORY 384E: Contemporary Muslim Political Thought (HISTORY 284E)

This course aims to provide an intellectual history of contemporary Muslim political thought. It presents post-nineteenth century Muslim contributions to political thought. It is designed as a survey of some major thinkers from the Arab world to Iran and Southeast Asia, from Turkey to North America, who sought to interpret Islam's basic sources and Islamic intellectual legacy. Our readings include primary texts by Tahtawi, Tunisi, Afghani, Rida, Huda Sharawi, Qutb, Shariati, and Mernissi among other prominent figures. We will analyze recurring ideas in this body of thought such as decline, civilization, rationality, ijtihad (Islamic independent reasoning), shura (deliberative decision-making), democracy, secularism, Muslim unity, khilafah (caliphate and vicegerency), freedom, equality, and justice. We will discuss their current significance for the ongoing theoretical debates in Muslim political thought, Muslim intellectual history, and comparative political theory.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Yenigun, H. (PI)

HISTORY 391B: The City in Imperial China

The evolution of cities in the early imperial, medieval, and early modern periods. Topics include physical structure, social order, cultural forms, economic roles, relations to rural hinterlands, and the contrast between imperial capitals and other cities. Comparative cases from European history. Readings include primary and secondary sources, and visual materials.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5

HISTORY 393: Frontier Expansion and Ethnic Statecraft in the Qing Empire (CHINA 393)

The legacy of the Qing dynasty in the territorial boundaries claimed by the People's Republic of China including the frontier zones that lie outside China proper. How the Qing acquired and ruled its frontier territories. Growth and migration of the Han Chinese population. How the dynasty's Manchu rulers managed ethnic difference. Consequences of Qing expansionism and ethnic statecraft for subject peoples and for the dynasty itself. At what point and by what processes did the Qing become China.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Sommer, M. (PI)

HISTORY 399P: Mastering Uncertainty: The Power of Archival Thinking (HISTORY 299P)

When confronted with chaos and uncertainty, do you know how to stay calm, ask the right questions, and find the answers? Archival researchers do. Do you realize that less than 1 percent of primary sources have been digitized, and that 99 percent still exist in their original formats in collections, small and large, scattered all across the world? Do you know how to find them and use them? Archival researchers do. Through hands-on exercises in Stanford¿s archives, students learn the fundamentals of archival research. Pursuing their own research interests, students will learn to become self-sufficient, independent researchers capable of navigating uncertainty and producing knowledge--a skill set in demand no matter what their major or post-graduate plans. Instructor permission required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Mullaney, T. (PI)

HISTORY 399W: Graduate Directed Reading

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit
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