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61 - 70 of 94 results for: HISTORY ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

HISTORY 299C: Senior Research III

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

HISTORY 299M: Undergraduate Directed Research: Martin Luther King, Jr., Research and Education Institute

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit

HISTORY 299P: Mastering Uncertainty: The Power of Archival Thinking (HISTORY 399P)

When confronted with chaos and uncertainty, do you know how to stay calm, ask the right questions, and find the answers? Archival researchers do. Do you realize that less than 1 percent of primary sources have been digitized, and that 99 percent still exist in their original formats in collections, small and large, scattered all across the world? Do you know how to find them and use them? Archival researchers do. Through hands-on exercises in Stanford¿s archives, students learn the fundamentals of archival research. Pursuing their own research interests, students will learn to become self-sufficient, independent researchers capable of navigating uncertainty and producing knowledge--a skill set in demand no matter what their major or post-graduate plans. Instructor permission required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Mullaney, T. (PI)

HISTORY 299S: Undergraduate Directed Research and Writing

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

HISTORY 303C: History of Ignorance

Scholars pay a lot of attention to knowledge--how it arises and impacts society--but much less attention has been given to ignorance, even though its impacts are equally profound. Here we explore the political history of ignorance, through case studies including: corporate denials of harms from particular products (tobacco, asbestos), climate change denialism, and creationist rejections of Darwinian evolution. Students will be expected to produce a research paper tracing the origins and impact of a particular form of ignorance.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Proctor, R. (PI)

HISTORY 304: Approaches to History

For first-year History and Classics Ph.D. students. This course explores ideas and debates that have animated historical discourse and shaped historiographical practice over the past half-century or so. The works we will be discussing raise fundamental questions about how historians imagine the past as they try to write about it, how they constitute it as a domain of study, how they can claim to know it, and how (and why) they argue about it.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Wigen, K. (PI)

HISTORY 309J: History of Surveillance (GERMAN 112, GERMAN 312, HISTORY 209J)

The question of surveillance (and its limits) is increasingly becoming a concern for individuals, organizations, and states around the globe. Indeed, from NSA databases to Alexa recordings, surveillance seems to be an unavoidable aspect of modern life. But how did surveillance become an everyday experience? This course explores the technological advancements, political aims, ideological commitments, and military goals that have fueled the rise of surveillance, especially throughout the past century. We will examine the ways in which states and organizations have developed surveillance programs and the consequences that these programs have had on both the watchers and the watched.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Anderson, C. (PI)

HISTORY 313: Core Colloquium: Graduate Readings in Medieval History

This course serves as a graduate-level introduction to major themes, problems, methods, and historiographical traditions in medieval European history.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Dorin, R. (PI)

HISTORY 325E: From Vladimir to Putin: Key Themes in Russian History (HISTORY 225E, REES 225E)

Formative issues in Russian history from Muscovy to the present: autocracy and totalitarianism; tsars, emperors, and party secretaries; multi-ethnicity and nationalism; serfdom, peasantry; rebellions and revolutions, dissent and opposition; law and legality; public and private spheres; religion and atheism; patterns of collapse. Class format will be discussion of one to two assigned books or major articles per class.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5
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