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81 - 90 of 121 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 306: Beyond Borders: Approaches to Transnational History

This core colloquium for the Transnational, International, and Global (TIG) field will introduce students to the major historiographical trends, methodological challenges, and theoretical approaches to studying and writing transnational histories.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 307D: Transhistory Colloquium (HISTORY 207D)

Colloquium on the history of transgender practices and identities. Readings will include scholarly texts from the emerging historical field of transhistory as well as adjacent fields within gender history. Colloquium will investigate avenues for deepening transhistory through further historical inquiry.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 310: The History of Occupation, 1914-2010 (HISTORY 210)

( History 210 is an undergraduate course offered for 5 units; History 310 is a graduate course offered for 4-5 units.) Examines the major cases of occupation in the twentieth century, from the first World War until the present, and issues of similarities, differences, and implications for contemporary policy making. Topics include European and Asian cases emerging from World War I and World War II, the Israeli occupation of the West Bank; the Soviet and American occupations of Afghanistan; and the American occupation of Iraq. Discussions will revolve around the problems, efficacy, and effects of occupation in historical perspective.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 323E: Cities of Empire: An Urban Journey through Eastern Europe and the Mediterranean (HISTORY 223E, REES 204, REES 304)

This course explores the cities of the Habsburg, Ottoman and Russian empires in the dynamic and turbulent period of their greatest transformation from the 19th century through the Two World Wars. Through the reading of urban biographies of Venice and Trieste, Vienna, Budapest, Cracow, Lviv, Sarajevo, Belgrade, Salonica, and Odessa, we consider broad historical trends of political, economic, and social modernization, urbanization, identity formation, imperialism, cosmopolitanism, and orientalism. As vibrant centers of coexistence and economic exchange, social and cultural borderlands, and sites of transgression, these cities provide an ideal lens through which to examine these themes in the context of transition from imperial to post-imperial space.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Knezevic, J. (PI)

HISTORY 326D: The Holocaust: Causes, Consequences, Memory (HISTORY 226D)

Overview of the history of the Holocaust, the genocide of European Jews. Explores its causes, course, consequences, and memory. Addresses the events themselves, as well as the roles of perpetrators and bystanders, dilemmas faced by victims, collaboration of local populations, and the issue of rescue. Considers how the Holocaust was and is remembered and commemorated by victims and participants alike. Uses different kinds of sources: scholarly work, memoirs, diaries, film, and primary documents.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 332D: Rome: From Pilgrimage to the Grand Tour

What lies beyond the ruins of an ancient city? How did Rome revive? The history of Rome from the late Middle Ages and Renaissance to the age of the Grand Tour. Topics include: the history of the papacy; the everyday world of Roman citizens; the relationship between the city and the surrounding countryside; the material transformation of Rome and projects to map the city; and its meaning for foreigners.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Findlen, P. (PI)

HISTORY 333J: Early British Empire: Themes and Approaches (HISTORY 233J)

This course explores the history of the early British empire, beginning with the question, "What is empire?" From plantations in Ireland, through the American Revolution, a turn to the east, and into Britain's imperial century, we will investigate how the empire began and evolved, with special attention to governance, ideology, technologies of rule, domestic effects, periodization, and historiography. Readings include primary sources and secondary texts specifically chosen to illustrate a variety of approaches to writing about empire.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Williams, J. (PI)

HISTORY 336G: Fascism and Populism in Europe since WWI (HISTORY 236G)

Examines the continuities and discontinuities between "classic" fascism of the interwar period, its ideological variations and contexts, and the "neo-fascisms," and radical right movements in Western Europe between 1945 and 1989. Uses these contexts to analyze the dramatic growth in right-wing populism in Western and Eastern Europe since 2008.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Specter, M. (PI)

HISTORY 337J: Nationhood and Nationalism in France: Modern French history through film and fiction (FRENCH 237A, FRENCH 337, HISTORY 237J)

Europe is seeing a rise in nationalist politics, fueled by fear of economic instability and immigration. In France, Marine Le Pen's far-right populist party Rassemblement National (until June 2018 - the Front National) has dominated political debates, insisting on preserving French national sovereignty. But what is a nation? What does it mean to be French? Who is included and who is excluded? In this course we will explore the construction of the idea of France in the face of revolution, the world wars and the Holocaust, and the violent end of colonialism. By looking at these critical historical moments, we will also gain a firmer grasp of contemporary problems surrounding nationhood in France and around the world. Sources will include films, novels, pamphlets, and political speeches. Course taught in English, with an optional French section.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 339E: Nationalism in European and World History, 18th Century until the Present (HISTORY 239E)

This course focuses on nationalism as a political and cultural phenomenon in the modern era. Through secondary and primary source readings, we study nationalist ideas, activists, movements, and state policies as well as their constructive and destructive effects across Europe and other parts of the world. Where did nationalism come from, under which conditions has it thrived, how has it shaped politics, societies, mentalities, and cultures? What did it mean to be a nationalist in different places and times?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ertz, S. (PI)
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