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71 - 80 of 114 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 299X: Preparing for International Field Work: Public Service or Research (HISTORY 399A)

Open to students in all classes, those planning internships abroad and those planning research, from juniors with honors theses and sophomores with Chappell Lougee grants to freshmen thinking ahead. Introduces resources on campus for planning international research and service. Raises issues that need to be considered in advance of going abroad: ethical concerns, Human Subjects Protocol, networking, personal safety and gender issues, confronting cultural differences. Exposes students to research methods: case studies, interviewing, working in foreign libraries and archives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

HISTORY 302G: Peoples, Armies and Governments of the Second World War (HISTORY 202G)

Clausewitz conceptualized war as always consisting of a trinity of passion, chance, and reason, mirrored, respectively, in the people, army and government. Following Clausewitz, this course examines the peoples, armies, and governments that shaped World War II. Analyzes the ideological, political, diplomatic and economic motivations and constraints of the belligerents and their resulting strategies, military planning and fighting. Explores the new realities of everyday life on the home fronts and the experiences of non-combatants during the war, the final destruction of National Socialist Germany and Imperial Japan, and the emerging conflict between the victors. How the peoples, armies and governments involved perceived their possibilities and choices as a means to understand the origins, events, dynamics and implications of the greatest war in history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Vardi, G. (PI)

HISTORY 304D: Advanced Topics in Agnotology (HISTORY 204D)

Advanced research into the history of ignorance. Our goal will be to explore how ignorance is created, maintained and destroyed, using case studies from topics such as tobacco denialism, global climate denialism, and other forms of resistance to knowledge making. Course culminates in a research paper on the theory and practice of agnotology, the science of ignorance.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Proctor, R. (PI)

HISTORY 304J: Religion, Violence, and Empire (HISTORY 204J)

Explores the interplay of religion and violence in the making and breaking of empires around the world from the Aztecs to al Qaida.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Crews, R. (PI)

HISTORY 305B: History of Fear (HISTORY 205B)

Whether directed at immigrants, infected airs, or the stock market, fear has often been a driving historical force. This class explores old and new approaches to the history of fear, with a focus on the early modern period. Themes include: epidemic prevention, xenophobia, dietary fears, weather phobias, concepts of anxiety, the place of fear in political theory, and political and economic uses of fear. A final project will require students to identify and explore the history of a particular fear.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Scholz, L. (PI)

HISTORY 308B: Women's Activist Response to War (FEMGEN 208B, HISTORY 208B, HUMRTS 113)

Theoretical issues, historical origins, changing forms of women's activism in response to war throughout the 20th century, and contemporary cases, such as the Russian Committee of Soldiers Mothers, Bosnian Mothers of Srebrenica, Serbian Women in Black, and the American Cindy Sheehan. Focus is on the U.S. and Eastern Europe, with attention to Israel, England, and Argentina.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 323E: Cities of Empire: An Urban Journey through Eastern Europe and the Mediterranean (HISTORY 223E, REES 204, REES 304)

This course explores the cities of the Habsburg, Ottoman and Russian empires in the dynamic and turbulent period of their greatest transformation from the 19th century through the Two World Wars. Through the reading of urban biographies of Venice and Trieste, Vienna, Budapest, Cracow, Lviv, Sarajevo, Belgrade, Salonica, and Odessa, we consider broad historical trends of political, economic, and social modernization, urbanization, identity formation, imperialism, cosmopolitanism, and orientalism. As vibrant centers of coexistence and economic exchange, social and cultural borderlands, and sites of transgression, these cities provide an ideal lens through which to examine these themes in the context of transition from imperial to post-imperial space.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Knezevic, J. (PI)

HISTORY 332D: Rome: From Pilgrimage to the Grand Tour

What lies beyond the ruins of an ancient city? How did Rome revive? The history of Rome from the late Middle Ages and Renaissance to the age of the Grand Tour. Topics include: the history of the papacy; the everyday world of Roman citizens; the relationship between the city and the surrounding countryside; the material transformation of Rome and projects to map the city; and its meaning for foreigners.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Findlen, P. (PI)

HISTORY 333J: Early British Empire: Themes and Approaches (HISTORY 233J)

This course explores the history of the early British empire, beginning with the question, "What is empire?" From plantations in Ireland, through the American Revolution, a turn to the east, and into Britain's imperial century, we will investigate how the empire began and evolved, with special attention to governance, ideology, technologies of rule, domestic effects, periodization, and historiography. Readings include primary sources and secondary texts specifically chosen to illustrate a variety of approaches to writing about empire.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Williams, J. (PI)

HISTORY 336G: Fascism and Populism in Europe since WWI (HISTORY 236G)

Examines the continuities and discontinuities between "classic" fascism of the interwar period, its ideological variations and contexts, and the "neo-fascisms," and radical right movements in Western Europe between 1945 and 1989. Uses these contexts to analyze the dramatic growth in right-wing populism in Western and Eastern Europe since 2008.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Specter, M. (PI)
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