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41 - 50 of 114 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 205D: Freedom in Chains: Black Slavery in the Atlantic, 1400s-1800s (AFRICAAM 113V, AFRICAST 113V, CSRE 113V)

This course will focus on the history of slavery in the British, French, Spanish, Portuguese and Dutch Atlantic world(s), from the late 1400s to the 1800s. Its main focus will be on the experiences of enslaved Africans and their descendants. Between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries, the Europeans forcibly embarked over 10 million Africans to the Americas. Drawing on methodologies used by historians, archaeologists and anthropologists, the course will reconstruct the daily lives and the socio-economic, cultural and political histories of these captives. We will seek to hear their voices by investigating a variety of historical testimonies and recent scholarship. The course will examine slavery in the context of broader trends in Atlantic World studies, a field that has grown considerably in recent years, providing new ways of understanding historical developments across national boundaries. We will seek to identify commonalities and differences across time periods and regions and the reasons for those differences. Covered topics will include slave ship voyages, labor, agency, the creation of new identities (creolization), religion, race, gender, resistance, legacies, and memory.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Lamotte, M. (PI)

HISTORY 208B: Women's Activist Response to War (FEMGEN 208B, HISTORY 308B, HUMRTS 113)

Theoretical issues, historical origins, changing forms of women's activism in response to war throughout the 20th century, and contemporary cases, such as the Russian Committee of Soldiers Mothers, Bosnian Mothers of Srebrenica, Serbian Women in Black, and the American Cindy Sheehan. Focus is on the U.S. and Eastern Europe, with attention to Israel, England, and Argentina.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 209S: Research Seminar for Majors

Required of History majors. How to conduct original, historical research and analysis, including methods such as using the libraries and archives at Stanford and elsewhere, and working collaboratively to frame topics, identify sources, and develop analyses. Autumn quarter focuses on American Political History and Comparative Colonialism; Winter quarter on Europe before 1500; Spring quarter on Gender/Race/Sexuality in U.S. History, Early Modern Travel Accounts, and Law, Society, and the Supernatural in Early Modern Europe.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 223E: Cities of Empire: An Urban Journey through Eastern Europe and the Mediterranean (HISTORY 323E, REES 204, REES 304)

This course explores the cities of the Habsburg, Ottoman and Russian empires in the dynamic and turbulent period of their greatest transformation from the 19th century through the Two World Wars. Through the reading of urban biographies of Venice and Trieste, Vienna, Budapest, Cracow, Lviv, Sarajevo, Belgrade, Salonica, and Odessa, we consider broad historical trends of political, economic, and social modernization, urbanization, identity formation, imperialism, cosmopolitanism, and orientalism. As vibrant centers of coexistence and economic exchange, social and cultural borderlands, and sites of transgression, these cities provide an ideal lens through which to examine these themes in the context of transition from imperial to post-imperial space.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Knezevic, J. (PI)

HISTORY 224D: The Soviet Civilization, Part 2 (HISTORY 424B)

Prerequisite: HISTORY 224A/424A
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Weiner, A. (PI)

HISTORY 233J: Early British Empire: Themes and Approaches (HISTORY 333J)

This course explores the history of the early British empire, beginning with the question, "What is empire?" From plantations in Ireland, through the American Revolution, a turn to the east, and into Britain's imperial century, we will investigate how the empire began and evolved, with special attention to governance, ideology, technologies of rule, domestic effects, periodization, and historiography. Readings include primary sources and secondary texts specifically chosen to illustrate a variety of approaches to writing about empire.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Williams, J. (PI)

HISTORY 235F: Camus (COMPLIT 229B, CSRE 129, FRENCH 129)

"The Don Draper of Existentialism" for Adam Gopnik, "the ideal husband of contemporary letters" for Susan Sontag, and "the admirable conjunction of a man, of an action, and of a work" for Sartre, Camus embodies the very French figure of the "intellectuel engagé," or public intellectual. From his birth in 1913 into a poor family in Algeria to the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1957, from Saint Germain-des-Prés to his predilection for the mediterranean culture, Camus captured the quest for universalism, for the politics of justice, and engaged in the great ethical battles of his time, from the fight against nazism and communism, from questioning colonial rules to the haunting Algerian War, and his complex "silence" over the war. Camus the Algerian, Camus the moralist, Camus the Resistant: through readings and films, we will explore his multiple, long-lasting legacies. Readings from Albert Camus, Kamel Daoud, Mouloud Feraoun, Alice Kaplan, Orhan Pamuk, A.B. Yehoshua, Assia Djebar, Jean-Paul Sartre, Yasmina Khadra. Movies include "The Stranger," and "Far from Men." This course is a gateway for French Studies, with special emphasis on oral proficiency. Taught in French.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ulloa, M. (PI)

HISTORY 236G: Fascism and Populism in Europe since WWI (HISTORY 336G)

Examines the continuities and discontinuities between "classic" fascism of the interwar period, its ideological variations and contexts, and the "neo-fascisms," and radical right movements in Western Europe between 1945 and 1989. Uses these contexts to analyze the dramatic growth in right-wing populism in Western and Eastern Europe since 2008.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Specter, M. (PI)

HISTORY 237J: Nationhood and Nationalism in France: Modern French history through film and fiction (FRENCH 237A, FRENCH 337, HISTORY 337J)

Europe is seeing a rise in nationalist politics, fueled by fear of economic instability and immigration. In France, Marine Le Pen's far-right populist party Rassemblement National (until June 2018 - the Front National) has dominated political debates, insisting on preserving French national sovereignty. But what is a nation? What does it mean to be French? Who is included and who is excluded? In this course we will explore the construction of the idea of France in the face of revolution, the world wars and the Holocaust, and the violent end of colonialism. By looking at these critical historical moments, we will also gain a firmer grasp of contemporary problems surrounding nationhood in France and around the world. Sources will include films, novels, pamphlets, and political speeches. Course taught in English, with an optional French section.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 239E: Nationalism in European and World History, 18th Century until the Present (HISTORY 339E)

This course focuses on nationalism as a political and cultural phenomenon in the modern era. Through secondary and primary source readings, we study nationalist ideas, activists, movements, and state policies as well as their constructive and destructive effects across Europe and other parts of the world. Where did nationalism come from, under which conditions has it thrived, how has it shaped politics, societies, mentalities, and cultures? What did it mean to be a nationalist in different places and times?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ertz, S. (PI)
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