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31 - 40 of 109 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 198: The History of Modern China

(Same as HISTORY 98. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 198.) Lecture course tracking the emergence of modern China from the Manchu conquest of 1644 to the US-China trade war of 2018. Draws on historical essays, fiction, art, and film to broaden your perspectives. Helps you understand China's historical transformations from empire to nation-state, and from midcentury Maoism to today's "socialism with Chinese characteristics." Provides students with background to intelligently discuss Chinese social, political, cultural, and economic changes, as well as an understanding of nationalism, gender, ethnicity, and sexuality.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Elmore, A. (PI)

HISTORY 200B: Doing Environmental History

This will be a hands-on course that will emphasize how to do environmental history. It will be both multidisciplinary, but will emphasize the different formats--photography, film, podcasts, digital representations, and writing --in which the history can be analyzed and presented. This course forms part of the "Doing History" series: rigorous undergraduate colloquia that introduce the practice of history within a particular field or thematic area.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 200E: Doing Economic History

The course introduces major approaches to economic history such as the classical school, Malthusianism, Marxism and Dependency theories, moral economic critique, institutionalism, technological determinism, environmentalism, and the Anthropocene thesis. Using these approaches, students will explore themes including pre-modern agrarian orders; the emergence of fiscal-military state; financial and commercial expansion; diverse property regimes; the industrial revolution; growth and poverty; markets and networks; labor and capital; the rise of capitalism and imperialisms; immigration; formal and informal economies; development and underdevelopment; globalization and environmental crisis. Special emphasis will be given to the theories of the Great Divergence, namely why the West became the dominant economic power over the rest of the world and how different economic cultures responded to that. This course forms part of the "Doing History" series: rigorous undergraduate colloquia that introduce the practice of history within a particular field or thematic area.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 200G: Doing Intellectual History

A consideration of the claims made by twentieth century historians regarding the nature and methods of intellectual history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Baker, K. (PI)

HISTORY 202G: Peoples, Armies and Governments of the Second World War (HISTORY 302G)

Clausewitz conceptualized war as always consisting of a trinity of passion, chance, and reason, mirrored, respectively, in the people, army and government. Following Clausewitz, this course examines the peoples, armies, and governments that shaped World War II. Analyzes the ideological, political, diplomatic and economic motivations and constraints of the belligerents and their resulting strategies, military planning and fighting. Explores the new realities of everyday life on the home fronts and the experiences of non-combatants during the war, the final destruction of National Socialist Germany and Imperial Japan, and the emerging conflict between the victors. How the peoples, armies and governments involved perceived their possibilities and choices as a means to understand the origins, events, dynamics and implications of the greatest war in history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Vardi, G. (PI)

HISTORY 202S: The History of Genocide (HISTORY 402D, JEWISHST 282S, JEWISHST 482D)

This course will explore the history, politics, and character of genocide from the beginning of world history to the present. It will also consider the ways that the international system has developed to prevent and punish genocide.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Naimark, N. (PI)

HISTORY 204D: Advanced Topics in Agnotology (HISTORY 304D)

Advanced research into the history of ignorance. Our goal will be to explore how ignorance is created, maintained and destroyed, using case studies from topics such as tobacco denialism, global climate denialism, and other forms of resistance to knowledge making. Course culminates in a research paper on the theory and practice of agnotology, the science of ignorance.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Proctor, R. (PI)

HISTORY 204J: Religion, Violence, and Empire (HISTORY 304J)

Explores the interplay of religion and violence in the making and breaking of empires around the world from the Aztecs to al Qaida.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Crews, R. (PI)

HISTORY 205B: History of Fear (HISTORY 305B)

Whether directed at immigrants, infected airs, or the stock market, fear has often been a driving historical force. This class explores old and new approaches to the history of fear, with a focus on the early modern period. Themes include: epidemic prevention, xenophobia, dietary fears, weather phobias, concepts of anxiety, the place of fear in political theory, and political and economic uses of fear. A final project will require students to identify and explore the history of a particular fear.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Scholz, L. (PI)

HISTORY 205D: Freedom in Chains: Black Slavery in the Atlantic, 1400s-1800s (AFRICAAM 113V, AFRICAST 113V, CSRE 113V)

This course will focus on the history of slavery in the British, French, Spanish, Portuguese and Dutch Atlantic world(s), from the late 1400s to the 1800s. Its main focus will be on the experiences of enslaved Africans and their descendants. Between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries, the Europeans forcibly embarked over 10 million Africans to the Americas. Drawing on methodologies used by historians, archaeologists and anthropologists, the course will reconstruct the daily lives and the socio-economic, cultural and political histories of these captives. We will seek to hear their voices by investigating a variety of historical testimonies and recent scholarship. The course will examine slavery in the context of broader trends in Atlantic World studies, a field that has grown considerably in recent years, providing new ways of understanding historical developments across national boundaries. We will seek to identify commonalities and differences across time periods and regions and the reasons for those differences. Covered topics will include slave ship voyages, labor, agency, the creation of new identities (creolization), religion, race, gender, resistance, legacies, and memory.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Lamotte, M. (PI)
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