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21 - 30 of 120 results for: HAAS::CEL

CSRE 162A: Spirituality and Nonviolent Urban and Social Transformation (RELIGST 162X, URBANST 126)

A life of engagement in social transformation is often built on a foundation of spiritual and religious commitments. Case studies of nonviolent social change agents including Rosa Parks in the civil rights movement, César Chávez in the labor movement, and WIlliam Sloane Coffin in the peace movement; the religious and spiritual underpinnings of their commitments. Theory and principles of nonviolence. Films and readings. Service learning component includes placements in organizations engaged in social transformation. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 164: Immigration and the Changing United States (CHILATST 164, SOC 164, SOC 264)

The role of race and ethnicity in immigrant group integration in the U.S. Topics include: theories of integration; racial and ethnic identity formation; racial and ethnic change; immigration policy; intermarriage; hybrid racial and ethnic identities; comparisons between contemporary and historical waves of immigration.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 166B: Immigration Debates in America, Past and Present (HISTORY 166B, HISTORY 366B)

Examines the ways in which the immigration of people from around the world and migration within the United States shaped American nation-building and ideas about national identity in the twentieth century. Focuses on how conflicting ideas about race, gender, ethnicity, and citizenship with respect to particular groups led to policies both of exclusion and integration. Part One begins with the ways in which the American views of race and citizenship in the colonial period through the post-Reconstruction Era led to the passage of the Chinese Exclusion Act in 1882 and subsequently to broader exclusions of immigrants from other parts of Asia, Southern and Eastern Europe, and Mexico. Explores how World War II and the Cold War challenged racial ideologies and led to policies of increasing liberalization culminating in the passage of the 1965 Immigration Act, which eliminated quotas based on national origins and opened the door for new waves of immigrants, especially from Asia and Latin America. Part Two considers new immigration patterns after 1965, including those of refugees, and investigates the contemporary debate over immigration and immigration policy in the post 9/11 era as well as inequalities within the system and the impact of foreign policy on exclusions and inclusions.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 192E: History of Sexual Violence in America (AFRICAAM 192, AMSTUD 258, FEMGEN 258, FEMGEN 358, HISTORY 258, HISTORY 358)

This undergraduate/graduate colloquium explores the history of sexual violence in America, with particular attention to the intersections of gender and race in the construction of rape. We discuss the changing definitions of sexual violence in law and in cultural representations from early settlement through the late-twentieth century, including slavery, wartime and prison rape, the history of lynching and anti-lynching movements, and feminist responses to sexual violence. In addition to introducing students to the literature on sexual violence, the course attempts to teach critical skills in the analysis of secondary and primary historical texts. Students write short weekly reading responses and a final paper; no final exam; fifth unit research or CEL options.nnLimited enrollment, permission of instructor required. Submit application form and indicate interest in CEL option. Priority admission to History, FGSS, CSRE, AFRICAAM, and AMSTUD declared majors and minors. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 196C: Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (ENGLISH 172D, PSYCH 155, SOC 146, TAPS 165)

How different disciplines approach topics and issues central to the study of ethnic and race relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. Lectures by senior faculty affiliated with CSRE. Discussions led by CSRE teaching fellows. Includes an optional Haas Center for Public Service certified Community Engaged Learning section. In accordance with Stanford virtual learning policies implemented for the Spring Quarter, all community engagement activities for this section will be conducted virtually. Please sign up for section 2 #33285 with Kendra, A. if you are interested in participating in virtual community engagement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 198: Internship for Public Service (CHILATST 198)

Students should consult with CCSRE Director of Community Engaged Learning (ddmurray@stanford.edu) to develop or gain approval for an internship that addresses race/ethnicity, public service, and social justice. Students will read a selection of short readings relevant to their placement, write bi-weekly reflections, and meet bi-weekly with the Director of Community Engaged Learning. Units are determined by the number of hours per week at the internship (2 hours/week = 1 unit; 5 hours/week = 2 units; 8 hours/week = 3 units; etc.) Group meetings may be required. May be repeated for credit.
Last offered: Summer 2020 | Repeatable for credit

CSRE 245: Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development (AFRICAAM 245, EDUC 245, PSYCH 245A)

This seminar will explore the impact and relative salience of racial/ethnic identity on select issues including: discrimination, social justice, mental health and academic performance. Theoretical perspectives on identity development will be reviewed, along with research on other social identity variables, such as social class, gender and regional identifications. New areas within this field such as the complexity of multiracial identity status and intersectional invisibility will also be discussed. Though the class will be rooted in psychology and psychological models of identity formation, no prior exposure to psychology is assumed and other disciplines-including cultural studies, feminist studies, and literature-will be incorporated into the course materials. Students will work with community partners to better understand the nuances of racial and ethnic identity development in different contexts. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

CSRE 260: Race and Ethnicity in Urban California (AFRICAAM 169A, AMSTUD 169, URBANST 169)

The course is part of an ongoing research project that examines the consequences of longterm social, economic, and political changes in ethnic and race relations in in urban California. The required readings, discussions, and service learning component all provide a platform for students to explore important issues, past and present, affecting California municipalities undergoing rapid demographic transformation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: McKibben, C. (PI)

DANCE 100: Dance, Movement and Medicine: Immersion in Dance for PD (NENS 222)

Combining actual dancing with medical research, this Cardinal Course investigates the dynamic complementary relationship between two practices, medicine and dance, through the lens of Parkinson's disease (PD), a progressive neurological disease that manifests a range of movement disorders. "Dance for PD" is an innovative approach to dancing --and to teaching dance --for those challenged by PD. Course format consists of: 1. Weekly Lecture/Seminar Presentation: Partial list of instructors include Ms. Frank, Dr. Bronte-Stewart and other Stanford medical experts & research scientists, David Leventhal (Director, "Dance for PD") and Bay Area "Dance for PD" certified master teachers, film-maker Dave Iverson, Damara Ganley, and acclaimed choreographers Joe Goode, Alex Ketley, Judith Smith (AXIS Dance). 2. Weekly Dance Class: Stanford students will fully participate as dancers, and creative partners, in the Stanford Neuroscience Health Center's ongoing "Dance for Parkinson's" community dance cl more »
Combining actual dancing with medical research, this Cardinal Course investigates the dynamic complementary relationship between two practices, medicine and dance, through the lens of Parkinson's disease (PD), a progressive neurological disease that manifests a range of movement disorders. "Dance for PD" is an innovative approach to dancing --and to teaching dance --for those challenged by PD. Course format consists of: 1. Weekly Lecture/Seminar Presentation: Partial list of instructors include Ms. Frank, Dr. Bronte-Stewart and other Stanford medical experts & research scientists, David Leventhal (Director, "Dance for PD") and Bay Area "Dance for PD" certified master teachers, film-maker Dave Iverson, Damara Ganley, and acclaimed choreographers Joe Goode, Alex Ketley, Judith Smith (AXIS Dance). 2. Weekly Dance Class: Stanford students will fully participate as dancers, and creative partners, in the Stanford Neuroscience Health Center's ongoing "Dance for Parkinson's" community dance class for people with PD. This Community Engaged Learning component provides opportunity to engage meaningfully with people in the PD community. Dancing together weekly, students will experience firsthand the embodied signature values of "Dance for PD" classes: full inclusion, embodied presence, aesthetic and expressive opportunity for creative engagement, and community-building in action. A weekly debriefing session within Friday's class time will allow students to integrate seminar material with their movement experiences.nnnNO PRE-REQUISITES: No prior dance experience required. Beginners are welcome.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit

DANCE 197: Dance in Prison: The Arts, Juvenile Justice, and Rehabilitation in America (AMSTUD 197, TAPS 197)

This class uses the lens of performance, and particularly dance, to explore the aesthetic, cultural, historical, and legal issues in the lives of incarcerated youth. In the process students gain an understanding of incarceration and its cultural dimensions. Class readings and discussions foreground the legal and social contexts surrounding prisons in the U.S., Particular attention will be paid to the nexus of art, community, and social action, and how dance might be used to study the performing arts effects on self-construction, perception, experiences of embodiment, and social control for incarcerated teenagers. The class includes guest speakers who bring important perspectives on criminal justice including returned citizens, a juvenile justice attorney, a restorative conferencing facilitator and a dancer who teaches women in prison to be their own dance instructors.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED
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