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1 - 10 of 25 results for: GSBGEN

GSBGEN 314: Creating High Potential Ventures in Developing Economies

GSB314 - Creating High Potential Ventures in Developing Economies (4 Units)nnNote: Students who only want to participate in the seminar/discussion portion of the class and not do a team-based project (see details below) may enroll in GSB514 for 2 units.nnnThis course addresses the distinctive challenges and opportunities of launching high-potential new ventures in developing economies. Developing economies are attractive targets for entrepreneurs because many are just starting to move up the growth curve, and they offer low-cost operating environments that can be great development labs for potentially disruptive innovations. They increase in attractiveness when their political institutions stabilize and they become more market-friendly. At the same time, developing economies pose serious challenges. Pioneering entrepreneurs take on significant risks to gain early mover advantages. Specifically, entrepreneurs will not be able to count on the same kind of supportive operating environments that we take for granted in the developed world. They often face cumbersome permit and licensing processes, poorly developed financial and labor markets, problematic import and export procedures, unreliable local supply chains, weak infrastructure, corruption, currency risks, limited investment capital, lack of financial exits and more. This course is designed to help would-be entrepreneurs - both founders and members of entrepreneurial teams - better understand and prepare for these issues as they pursue the opportunities and address the challenges to start, grow, and harvest their ventures in these environments.nnnGSB314 combines a seminar/discussion format (Tuesdays) with a team-based project (Thursdays). For the Tuesday sessions, students will read about and discuss the key challenges described above and potential solutions. Guests will describe their own startup and investing experiences in developing economies and answer questions. A framework based on the recently published World Economic Forum (WEF) report on "Entrepreneurial Ecosystems Around the Globe and Company Growth Dynamics" will be used to structure the course. Each student will prepare a short paper on a topic of interest from this portion of the course.nnnThe Thursday sessions is a team-based exercise for students who either have a specific idea or want to join a team of classmates to pursue more deeply an understanding of the team's country of focus and an initial investigation of the idea's viability. Students must come in willing to be team players and do the work necessary to complete this exercise over the full quarter. Each team member's contributions will be assessed by fellow teammates. Teams will be formed before the start of class or on the first day at the latest. The team will describe, in a final presentation, the challenges and opportunities in their country using the WEF framework. The final presentation will also include the team's thoughts on the viability of their proposed venture and how it capitalizes on their country's assets and addresses its challenges. A detailed business plan is not required; however, specific recommendations and plans for next steps that would be carried out during a 3 to 6 month field and market research study in the country will be part of the final presentation.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

GSBGEN 335: Clean Energy Project Development and Finance

This case study-oriented course will focus on the critical skills needed to evaluate, develop, finance (on a non-recourse basis), and complete standalone energy and infrastructure projects. The primary course materials will be documents from several representative projects - e.g. wind and carbon capture - covering key areas including market and feasibility studies, environmental permitting and regulatory decisions, financial disclosure from bank and bond transactions, and construction, input, and offtake contracts. Documents from executed transactions are highly customized. By taking a forensic approach, looking at several different deals, we can learn how project developers, financiers, and lawyers work to get deals over the finish line that meet the demands of the market, the requirements of the law, and (sometimes) broader societal goals.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

GSBGEN 390: Individual Research

Need approval from sponsoring faculty member and GSB Registrar.
Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail
Instructors: Aaker, J. (PI) ; Abbey, D. (PI) ; Admati, A. (PI) ; Athey, S. (PI) ; Barnett, W. (PI) ; Barth, M. (PI) ; Bayati, M. (PI) ; Bendor, J. (PI) ; Benkard, L. (PI) ; Berk, J. (PI) ; Bernstein, S. (PI) ; Bettinger, E. (PI) ; Beyer, A. (PI) ; Bimpikis, K. (PI) ; Blankespoor, E. (PI) ; Bowen, R. (PI) ; Bowman, K. (PI) ; Brady, D. (PI) ; Brady, S. (PI) ; Breon-Drish, B. (PI) ; Brest, P. (PI) ; Bulow, J. (PI) ; Burgelman, R. (PI) ; Callander, S. (PI) ; Carroll, G. (PI) ; Casey, K. (PI) ; Ciesinski, S. (PI) ; De Simone, L. (PI) ; DeMarzo, P. (PI) ; Di Tella, S. (PI) ; Diamond, R. (PI) ; Duffie, D. (PI) ; Ellis, J. (PI) ; Feinberg, Y. (PI) ; Ferguson, J. (PI) ; Flanagan, R. (PI) ; Flynn, F. (PI) ; Foarta, D. (PI) ; Foster, G. (PI) ; Gardete, P. (PI) ; Glickman, M. (PI) ; Glynn, J. (PI) ; Goldberg, A. (PI) ; Greer, L. (PI) ; Grenadier, S. (PI) ; Gruenfeld, D. (PI) ; Gur, Y. (PI) ; Guttentag, B. (PI) ; Halevy, N. (PI) ; Hannan, M. (PI) ; Hartmann, W. (PI) ; Hasan, S. (PI) ; Heath, C. (PI) ; Huang, S. (PI) ; Iancu, D. (PI) ; Imbens, G. (PI) ; Jenter, D. (PI) ; Jha, S. (PI) ; Jones, C. (PI) ; Kasznik, R. (PI) ; Katzir, D. (PI) ; Kelly, P. (PI) ; Kessler, D. (PI) ; Khan, U. (PI) ; Klein, D. (PI) ; Koudijs, P. (PI) ; Kramer, R. (PI) ; Krehbiel, K. (PI) ; Kreps, D. (PI) ; Krishnamurthy, A. (PI) ; Lambert, N. (PI) ; Larcker, D. (PI) ; Lattin, J. (PI) ; Laurin, K. (PI) ; Lazear, E. (PI) ; Lee, C. (PI) ; Lee, G. (PI) ; Lee, H. (PI) ; Leslie, M. (PI) ; Levav, J. (PI) ; Levine, P. (PI) ; Linbeck, L. (PI) ; Lowery, B. (PI) ; Malhotra, N. (PI) ; Marinovic, I. (PI) ; McDonald, J. (PI) ; McNichols, M. (PI) ; McQuade, T. (PI) ; Meehan, B. (PI) ; Mendelson, H. (PI) ; Miller, D. (PI) ; Monin, B. (PI) ; Nair, H. (PI) ; Narayanan, S. (PI) ; Neale, M. (PI) ; O'Reilly, C. (PI) ; Ostrovsky, M. (PI) ; Oyer, P. (PI) ; Parker, G. (PI) ; Patell, J. (PI) ; Perez-Gonzalez, F. (PI) ; Peterson, J. (PI) ; Pfeffer, J. (PI) ; Pfleiderer, P. (PI) ; Piotroski, J. (PI) ; Plambeck, E. (PI) ; Powers, J. (PI) ; Rajan, M. (PI) ; Rao, H. (PI) ; Rauh, J. (PI) ; Reguant-Rido, M. (PI) ; Reichelstein, S. (PI) ; Reicher, D. (PI) ; Reiss, P. (PI) ; Rhein, B. (PI) ; Rice, C. (PI) ; Rohan, D. (PI) ; Rosen, H. (PI) ; Sahni, N. (PI) ; Schramm, J. (PI) ; Seiler, S. (PI) ; Shaw, K. (PI) ; Shiv, B. (PI) ; Shotts, K. (PI) ; Siegel, R. (PI) ; Siegelman, R. (PI) ; Simonson, I. (PI) ; Singleton, K. (PI) ; Skrzypacz, A. (PI) ; Sorensen, J. (PI) ; Soule, S. (PI) ; Strebulaev, I. (PI) ; Sugaya, T. (PI) ; Sutton, R. (PI) ; Taweel, K. (PI) ; Tiedens, L. (PI) ; Tonetti, C. (PI) ; Tormala, Z. (PI) ; Vanasco, V. (PI) ; Weaver, G. (PI) ; Wein, L. (PI) ; Whang, S. (PI) ; Wheeler, S. (PI) ; Wood, D. (PI) ; Yurukoglu, A. (PI) ; Zenios, S. (PI) ; Ziebelman, P. (PI) ; Zwiebel, J. (PI) ; deHaan, E. (PI)

GSBGEN 514: Creating High Potential Ventures in Developing Economies

GSB514 - Creating High Potential Ventures in Developing Economies (2 Units)nnNote: Students who want to work on a team to investigate a specific new venture idea in addition to participating in the seminar/discussion sessions (see details below) should enroll in GSB314 for 4 units. nnThis course addresses the distinctive challenges and opportunities of launching high-potential new ventures in developing economies. Developing economies are attractive targets for entrepreneurs because many are just starting to move up the growth curve, and they offer low-cost operating environments that can be great development labs for potentially disruptive innovations. They increase in attractiveness when their political institutions stabilize and they become more market-friendly. At the same time, developing economies pose serious challenges. Pioneering entrepreneurs take on significant risks to gain early mover advantages. Specifically, entrepreneurs will not be able to count on the same kind of supportive operating environments that we take for granted in the developed world. They often face cumbersome permit and licensing processes, poorly developed financial and labor markets, problematic import and export procedures, unreliable local supply chains, weak infrastructure, corruption, currency risks, limited investment capital, lack of financial exits and more. This course is designed to help would-be entrepreneurs - both founders and members of entrepreneurial teams - better understand and prepare for these issues as they pursue the opportunities and address the challenges to start, grow, and harvest their ventures in these environments. nnGSB514 is a seminar/discussion format in which students will read about and discuss the key challenges described above and potential solutions. Guests will describe their own startup and investing experiences in developing economies and answer questions. A framework based on the recently published World Economic Forum (WEF) report on "Entrepreneurial Ecosystems Around the Globe and Company Growth Dynamics" will be used to structure the course. Each student will prepare a short paper on a topic of interest from the course.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

GSBGEN 550: Issues in Leadership

This seminar will explore the nature and role of leadership in organizations. We will examine such questions as (1) What is leadership? (2) Why is it important? (3) What is it that leaders actually do? (4) How do they do it? (5) How are leaders developed? (6) Why do leaders succeed or fail? (7) What about your potential for leadership and your strategy for developing it?nnOur primary objective in this seminar is to achieve a deeper understanding of the nature and role of leadership in organizations. Our approach will be to examine a small sample of the literature, together with the amazing story of Ernest Shackleton and his Endurance crew, and then to probe several key questions through lively class discussion. The discussion, informed by the readings and also by our collective experiences, will seek to develop some general principles and observations about leadership - particularly about how you might better develop yourself as a leader.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF
Instructors: Joss, R. (PI)

GSBGEN 646: Behavioral Decision Making

This seminar examines research on the psychology of judgment and choice. Although the normative issue of how decisions should be made is relevant, the descriptive issue of how decisions are made is the main focus of the course. Topics of discussion include choice, judgment heuristics and biases, decision framing, prospect theory, mental accounting, context effects, task effects, regret, and other topics. The goal of the seminar is twofold: to foster a critical appreciation of existing knowledge in behavioral decision theory, to develop the students' skills in identifying and testing interesting research ideas, and to explore research opportunities for adding to that knowledge.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Simonson, I. (PI)

GSBGEN 697: Research Fellows Practicum

Units: 1-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail
Instructors: Benkard, L. (PI)

GSBGEN 698: Doctoral Practicum in Teaching

Doctoral Practicum in Teaching
Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Aaker, J. (PI) ; Admati, A. (PI) ; Athey, S. (PI) ; Barnett, W. (PI) ; Barth, M. (PI) ; Bayati, M. (PI) ; Bendor, J. (PI) ; Benkard, L. (PI) ; Berk, J. (PI) ; Bernstein, S. (PI) ; Beyer, A. (PI) ; Bimpikis, K. (PI) ; Blankespoor, E. (PI) ; Bowen, R. (PI) ; Brady, D. (PI) ; Breon-Drish, B. (PI) ; Bulow, J. (PI) ; Burgelman, R. (PI) ; Callander, S. (PI) ; Carroll, G. (PI) ; Casey, K. (PI) ; De Simone, L. (PI) ; DeMarzo, P. (PI) ; Di Tella, S. (PI) ; Diamond, R. (PI) ; Duffie, D. (PI) ; Feinberg, Y. (PI) ; Ferguson, J. (PI) ; Flynn, F. (PI) ; Foarta, D. (PI) ; Foster, G. (PI) ; Gardete, P. (PI) ; Goldberg, A. (PI) ; Greer, L. (PI) ; Grenadier, S. (PI) ; Gruenfeld, D. (PI) ; Gur, Y. (PI) ; Halevy, N. (PI) ; Hannan, M. (PI) ; Hartmann, W. (PI) ; Hasan, S. (PI) ; Heath, C. (PI) ; Huang, S. (PI) ; Iancu, D. (PI) ; Imbens, G. (PI) ; Jenter, D. (PI) ; Jha, S. (PI) ; Jones, C. (PI) ; Kasznik, R. (PI) ; Kessler, D. (PI) ; Khan, U. (PI) ; Koudijs, P. (PI) ; Kramer, R. (PI) ; Krehbiel, K. (PI) ; Kreps, D. (PI) ; Krishnamurthy, A. (PI) ; Lambert, N. (PI) ; Larcker, D. (PI) ; Lattin, J. (PI) ; Laurin, K. (PI) ; Lazear, E. (PI) ; Lee, C. (PI) ; Lee, H. (PI) ; Levav, J. (PI) ; Lowery, B. (PI) ; Malhotra, N. (PI) ; Marinovic, I. (PI) ; McDonald, J. (PI) ; McNichols, M. (PI) ; McQuade, T. (PI) ; Mendelson, H. (PI) ; Miller, D. (PI) ; Monin, B. (PI) ; Nair, H. (PI) ; Narayanan, S. (PI) ; Neale, M. (PI) ; O'Reilly, C. (PI) ; Ostrovsky, M. (PI) ; Oyer, P. (PI) ; Patell, J. (PI) ; Perez-Gonzalez, F. (PI) ; Pfeffer, J. (PI) ; Pfleiderer, P. (PI) ; Piotroski, J. (PI) ; Plambeck, E. (PI) ; Rajan, M. (PI) ; Rao, H. (PI) ; Rauh, J. (PI) ; Reguant-Rido, M. (PI) ; Reichelstein, S. (PI) ; Reiss, P. (PI) ; Rice, C. (PI) ; Sahni, N. (PI) ; Seiler, S. (PI) ; Shaw, K. (PI) ; Shiv, B. (PI) ; Shotts, K. (PI) ; Simonson, I. (PI) ; Singleton, K. (PI) ; Skrzypacz, A. (PI) ; Sorensen, J. (PI) ; Soule, S. (PI) ; Strebulaev, I. (PI) ; Sugaya, T. (PI) ; Tiedens, L. (PI) ; Tonetti, C. (PI) ; Tormala, Z. (PI) ; Vanasco, V. (PI) ; Wein, L. (PI) ; Whang, S. (PI) ; Wheeler, S. (PI) ; Yurukoglu, A. (PI) ; Zenios, S. (PI) ; Zwiebel, J. (PI) ; deHaan, E. (PI)

GSBGEN 699: Doctoral Practicum in Research

Doctoral Practicum in Research
Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Aaker, J. (PI) ; Admati, A. (PI) ; Athey, S. (PI) ; Barnett, W. (PI) ; Barth, M. (PI) ; Bayati, M. (PI) ; Bendor, J. (PI) ; Benkard, L. (PI) ; Berk, J. (PI) ; Bernstein, S. (PI) ; Beyer, A. (PI) ; Bimpikis, K. (PI) ; Blankespoor, E. (PI) ; Bowen, R. (PI) ; Brady, D. (PI) ; Breon-Drish, B. (PI) ; Bulow, J. (PI) ; Burgelman, R. (PI) ; Callander, S. (PI) ; Carroll, G. (PI) ; Casey, K. (PI) ; De Simone, L. (PI) ; DeMarzo, P. (PI) ; Di Tella, S. (PI) ; Diamond, R. (PI) ; Duffie, D. (PI) ; Feinberg, Y. (PI) ; Ferguson, J. (PI) ; Flynn, F. (PI) ; Foarta, D. (PI) ; Foster, G. (PI) ; Gardete, P. (PI) ; Goldberg, A. (PI) ; Greer, L. (PI) ; Grenadier, S. (PI) ; Gruenfeld, D. (PI) ; Gur, Y. (PI) ; Halevy, N. (PI) ; Hannan, M. (PI) ; Hartmann, W. (PI) ; Hasan, S. (PI) ; Heath, C. (PI) ; Huang, S. (PI) ; Iancu, D. (PI) ; Imbens, G. (PI) ; Jenter, D. (PI) ; Jha, S. (PI) ; Jones, C. (PI) ; Kasznik, R. (PI) ; Kessler, D. (PI) ; Khan, U. (PI) ; Koudijs, P. (PI) ; Kramer, R. (PI) ; Krehbiel, K. (PI) ; Kreps, D. (PI) ; Krishnamurthy, A. (PI) ; Lambert, N. (PI) ; Larcker, D. (PI) ; Lattin, J. (PI) ; Laurin, K. (PI) ; Lazear, E. (PI) ; Lee, C. (PI) ; Lee, H. (PI) ; Levav, J. (PI) ; Lowery, B. (PI) ; Malhotra, N. (PI) ; Marinovic, I. (PI) ; McDonald, J. (PI) ; McNichols, M. (PI) ; McQuade, T. (PI) ; Mendelson, H. (PI) ; Miller, D. (PI) ; Monin, B. (PI) ; Nair, H. (PI) ; Narayanan, S. (PI) ; Neale, M. (PI) ; O'Reilly, C. (PI) ; Ostrovsky, M. (PI) ; Oyer, P. (PI) ; Patell, J. (PI) ; Perez-Gonzalez, F. (PI) ; Pfeffer, J. (PI) ; Pfleiderer, P. (PI) ; Piotroski, J. (PI) ; Plambeck, E. (PI) ; Rajan, M. (PI) ; Rao, H. (PI) ; Rauh, J. (PI) ; Reguant-Rido, M. (PI) ; Reichelstein, S. (PI) ; Reiss, P. (PI) ; Rice, C. (PI) ; Sahni, N. (PI) ; Seiler, S. (PI) ; Shaw, K. (PI) ; Shiv, B. (PI) ; Shotts, K. (PI) ; Simonson, I. (PI) ; Singleton, K. (PI) ; Skrzypacz, A. (PI) ; Sorensen, J. (PI) ; Soule, S. (PI) ; Strebulaev, I. (PI) ; Sugaya, T. (PI) ; Tiedens, L. (PI) ; Tonetti, C. (PI) ; Tormala, Z. (PI) ; Vanasco, V. (PI) ; Wein, L. (PI) ; Whang, S. (PI) ; Wheeler, S. (PI) ; Yurukoglu, A. (PI) ; Zenios, S. (PI) ; Zwiebel, J. (PI) ; deHaan, E. (PI)

GSBGEN 111Q: Seminar in Entrepreneurial Communication

College campuses have been the incubators for thousands of new business ventures. What makes the difference between a successful entrepreneur and an initial failure out of the gate? It's often not the quality of the idea, but rather the ability of the entrepreneurs to successfully communicate their vision to potential investors, employees, and customers. This seminar will explore successful and failed entrepreneurial communication. Students will learn the basics of persuasive oral and written communication, and then apply these principles to their own ideas.
Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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