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11 - 20 of 29 results for: GSBGEN

GSBGEN 356: Dynamics of the Global Wine Industry

This course will examine the world of wine with a fresh and contemporary lens. It will explore the market dynamics of this fascinating global industry. The goal of the course is to provide insight into the branding, marketing, and distribution dynamics that shape what consumers can buy and consume with a focus on the strategies of some of the world's leading wine brands. Attention will also be paid to the legal, regulatory, and market dynamics that define the U.S. wine industry as well as to issues of contested authenticity in the world of wine.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Rapp, A. (PI)

GSBGEN 360: Sports Business Management

This course will examine the diverse management challenges facing the sports industry. The course will cover issues at the league level, the team level, the athlete/agent level, and the college level. The diverse constituencies with interests in sports issues (athletes, fans, media companies, advertisers, and legislators to name a few) will be discussed. Sports issues at a global level (the IOC) and both U.S. and outside U.S. will be covered. There will be coverage of evolving business ventures related to the sports industry (such as venture backed sports companies and sports networks). A key focus is on how the sports industry is similar to and different from other industries. Key concepts underlying the course are: value creation/value sharing; revenue ecosystem; virtuous circles and vicious circles; disruptive technologies; growth facilitators and growth inhibitors; leveragable assets/inherited liabilities; and entrepreneurship/new product innovations. Over 80% of the sessions typically will include a guest co-lecturer from the sporting industry.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

GSBGEN 363: Fiscal Policy

One of every four dollars in the American economy will be spent by the federal government this year. This course will examine how federal spending, taxes, deficits and debt affect the U.S. economy and global financial markets, and how the economy affects the federal budget. We will look inside the federal budget to understand entitlement spending, what causes it to grow so fast, how it could be reformed, and why that's so hard to do. We'll understand where the money goes -- how much goes to infrastructure, education, housing, health care, energy and the environment, parks, scientific research, national defense, and other needs. We'll look at the stimulus vs. austerity debate, both within the U.S. and between the U.S. and Europe. We'll look beyond partisan battle lines and explore various fiscal philosophies that sometimes split the political parties. We'll cover the federal budget process from developing the President's budget to enacting individual spending and tax bills, and discuss more »
One of every four dollars in the American economy will be spent by the federal government this year. This course will examine how federal spending, taxes, deficits and debt affect the U.S. economy and global financial markets, and how the economy affects the federal budget. We will look inside the federal budget to understand entitlement spending, what causes it to grow so fast, how it could be reformed, and why that's so hard to do. We'll understand where the money goes -- how much goes to infrastructure, education, housing, health care, energy and the environment, parks, scientific research, national defense, and other needs. We'll look at the stimulus vs. austerity debate, both within the U.S. and between the U.S. and Europe. We'll look beyond partisan battle lines and explore various fiscal philosophies that sometimes split the political parties. We'll cover the federal budget process from developing the President's budget to enacting individual spending and tax bills, and discuss process reforms including spending and deficit reduction targets, a balanced budget amendment, and line item veto. We'll cover the major players in the budget debate and understand where the big and small budget decisions are made. We'll look at federal taxation, where the money comes from, how it affects the economy, and how it might be restructured. We'll examine the recommendations of the President's budget commission and see if we can predict what will become of its recommendations. And we'll see if we, as a class, can solve our nation's fiscal problems as Washington has so far been unable to do.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

GSBGEN 390: Individual Research

Need approval from sponsoring faculty member and GSB Registrar.
Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail
Instructors: Aaker, J. (PI) ; Admati, A. (PI) ; Akbarpour, M. (PI) ; Anderson-Macdonald, S. (PI) ; Arrillaga, L. (PI) ; Athey, S. (PI) ; Barnett, W. (PI) ; Barth, M. (PI) ; Bayati, M. (PI) ; Begenau, J. (PI) ; Bendor, J. (PI) ; Benkard, L. (PI) ; Berg, J. (PI) ; Berk, J. (PI) ; Bernstein, S. (PI) ; Beyer, A. (PI) ; Bimpikis, K. (PI) ; Blankespoor, E. (PI) ; Brady, D. (PI) ; Brady, S. (PI) ; Broockman, D. (PI) ; Bulow, J. (PI) ; Burgelman, R. (PI) ; Callander, S. (PI) ; Carroll, G. (PI) ; Casey, K. (PI) ; Choi, J. (PI) ; Clement, J. (PI) ; De Simone, L. (PI) ; DeMarzo, P. (PI) ; Di Tella, S. (PI) ; Diamond, R. (PI) ; Duffie, D. (PI) ; Feinberg, Y. (PI) ; Flynn, F. (PI) ; Foarta, D. (PI) ; Foster, G. (PI) ; Gardete, P. (PI) ; Gipper, B. (PI) ; Goldberg, A. (PI) ; Greer, L. (PI) ; Grenadier, S. (PI) ; Gruenfeld, D. (PI) ; Gur, Y. (PI) ; Halevy, N. (PI) ; Hartmann, W. (PI) ; Heath, C. (PI) ; Hebert, B. (PI) ; Huang, S. (PI) ; Iancu, D. (PI) ; Imbens, G. (PI) ; Jha, S. (PI) ; Jones, C. (PI) ; Kasznik, R. (PI) ; Kessler, D. (PI) ; Kosinski, M. (PI) ; Koudijs, P. (PI) ; Kramer, R. (PI) ; Krehbiel, K. (PI) ; Kreps, D. (PI) ; Krishnamurthy, A. (PI) ; Lambert, N. (PI) ; Larcker, D. (PI) ; Lattin, J. (PI) ; Lazear, E. (PI) ; Lee, C. (PI) ; Lee, H. (PI) ; Lester, R. (PI) ; Levav, J. (PI) ; Lowery, B. (PI) ; Lustig, H. (PI) ; Malhotra, N. (PI) ; Marinovic, I. (PI) ; Martin, A. (PI) ; Martin, G. (PI) ; McNichols, M. (PI) ; McQuade, T. (PI) ; Mendelson, H. (PI) ; Miller, D. (PI) ; Monin, B. (PI) ; Narayanan, S. (PI) ; Neale, M. (PI) ; O'Reilly, C. (PI) ; Ostrovsky, M. (PI) ; Oyer, P. (PI) ; Pfeffer, J. (PI) ; Pfleiderer, P. (PI) ; Piotroski, J. (PI) ; Plambeck, E. (PI) ; Ranganathan, A. (PI) ; Rao, H. (PI) ; Rauh, J. (PI) ; Reichelstein, S. (PI) ; Reiss, P. (PI) ; Rice, C. (PI) ; Saban, D. (PI) ; Sahni, N. (PI) ; Saloner, G. (PI) ; Sannikov, Y. (PI) ; Seiler, S. (PI) ; Seru, A. (PI) ; Shaw, K. (PI) ; Shiv, B. (PI) ; Shotts, K. (PI) ; Siegel, R. (PI) ; Simonson, I. (PI) ; Singleton, K. (PI) ; Skrzypacz, A. (PI) ; Somaini, P. (PI) ; Sorensen, J. (PI) ; Soule, S. (PI) ; Sterling, A. (PI) ; Strebulaev, I. (PI) ; Sugaya, T. (PI) ; Tormala, Z. (PI) ; Wager, S. (PI) ; Weaver, G. (PI) ; Wein, L. (PI) ; Weintraub, G. (PI) ; Whang, S. (PI) ; Wheeler, S. (PI) ; Xu, K. (PI) ; Yurukoglu, A. (PI) ; Zenios, S. (PI) ; Zwiebel, J. (PI)

GSBGEN 503: The Business of Healthcare

Healthcare spending is now nearly 18% of the entire GDP of the U.S. economy. The S&P healthcare sector has been one of the best producing segments of the market for the last five years, and growth of healthcare expenditures continue to escalate at a rapid pace. This has triggered an abundance of opportunities for those interested in a career in healthcare management, investing, or entrepreneurialism. The Business of Healthcare-2017-18 will present the current market framework from the eyes of a clinician and with the perspective of the consumer-patient, but with the experience of a successful business builder and investor. Course will begin with the discussion of the channels of distribution of healthcare delivery, from providers, to practitioners, to consumer-facing ¿healthcare lite¿ sectors of the market. Impact of the regulatory environment, with specific focus on the Affordable Care Act and the impending plans to Repeal/Replace, will be evaluated. High-level exploration of international health care markets and how they compare to the American market will be included. Overview of venture and private equity investing will be deeply probed, with many specific market examples of how investors develop an investment thesis, identify specific targets, diligence companies, and close an investment. Discussion around building financial modeling for target acquisitions will be presented, and the course will delve into the burgeoning area of healthcare analytics and outcomes management, including Artificial Intelligence, and its future impact on positioning, reimbursement and clinical outcomes. Sectors that will be discussed include: Healthcare services, Healthcare IT, Life Sciences, Pharma and Biotechnology, and Managed Care. The topic of the emerging importance of consumerism will be probed and consumer-directed healthcare related products and services will be explored, e.g. nutraceuticals, wellness, fitness, etc. Course will include preparatory readings, presentations from successful and powerful industry leaders, and robust in-class discussion and case studies requiring student engagement. Final grade will consist of class participation, one minor in-class presentation, and a final paper developing either a new healthcare business start-up proposition or presenting an identified investment target in the healthcare industry. Course will be especially valuable for those interested in a career in starting a healthcare company, healthcare investing, healthcare administration, or other healthcare-related management and goal of class will be provide an in-depth overview of how to get started or advance a professional interest in the industry.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF
Instructors: Krubert, C. (PI)

GSBGEN 508: Strategic Pivoting for Your Next Chapter

Many students come to the GSB with the intent to pivot upon leaving the institution. Some students feel they have outgrown their position or business, or they feel drawn to a new area that better suits their values and interests, where they can make a greater contribution. Some students have no idea what they want to do after graduating, they just know they want to make a purposeful change. And finally, some students want to strategically change their direction for reputation reasons. The average U.S. employee tenure is only 4-5 years and job roles often change dramatically within that timeframe. Pivoting is an intentional, methodical process for nimbly navigating career changes. A recent Gallup study revealed that almost 90% of workers are either ¿not engaged¿ or ¿actively disengaged¿ from their jobs. A pivot is a change made of your own volition when you have reached a point in your career when you are ready for increased challenge and impact. Strategic Pivoting is a course specifica more »
Many students come to the GSB with the intent to pivot upon leaving the institution. Some students feel they have outgrown their position or business, or they feel drawn to a new area that better suits their values and interests, where they can make a greater contribution. Some students have no idea what they want to do after graduating, they just know they want to make a purposeful change. And finally, some students want to strategically change their direction for reputation reasons. The average U.S. employee tenure is only 4-5 years and job roles often change dramatically within that timeframe. Pivoting is an intentional, methodical process for nimbly navigating career changes. A recent Gallup study revealed that almost 90% of workers are either ¿not engaged¿ or ¿actively disengaged¿ from their jobs. A pivot is a change made of your own volition when you have reached a point in your career when you are ready for increased challenge and impact. Strategic Pivoting is a course specifically developed for any student who already plans to pivot in their career and wants to figure out how to successfully build and create their next chapter. In this course we will discuss four stages for how to best pivot: 1) Planting, how to assess and set a strong foundation of values, strengths and interests. 2) Scanning, researching new and related skills, talking to others, and mapping potential opportunities. 3) Piloting, students conduct small, low-risk experiments to test their new direction, as well as gather real-time data and feedback. And 4) Launching, pulling the trigger, fully committed, to your carefully plotted pivot. The ultimate pay-off to Strategic Pivoting is acknowledging and adapting to a rapidly changing society when it comes to career paths. Because our careers are so fundamentally tied to our livelihood and sense of confidence, purpose and meaning, changes can be traumatic without a road map for traversing them. "Navigating this accelerated pace of change and this transitional career state, and learning to embrace it instead of resisting it, can become an edge and advantage." Alex Rodriguez, Major League Baseball icon, ABC/Fox Sports/ESPN commentator, entrepreneur, and CEO of A-Rod Corp will be a featured Guest Speaker in this course. Alex has also had a history of successfully pivoting his career and defying expectations. He is presently getting ready to host his own ESPN interview show called, "Pivot."
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Kluger, A. (PI)

GSBGEN 511: Making Social Ventures Happen by Attracting Financial and Human Capital

Social ventures require leadership, funding, expertise, skills and networks to get off the ground, grow and scale. This course will focus on the key strategies for building and leveraging a network of champions to capitalize a social venture at early-stage, and for sustaining and growing that network as the venture grows. This class is applicable to intrapreneurs, changemakers within major institutions, (private or public), board members, impact investors, those who aspire to be senior leaders within social ventures and social entrepreneurs (founders). Co-led by a practicing venture philanthropist and a social entrepreneur, this interactive, pragmatic course will: - Discuss the critical financial and human capital needs of organizations and companies at different life stages. - Explore the concept of champions and the different types of champions including board chairs, co-founders, mentors, faculty advisors, donors, investors, community evangelists, and fellow entrepreneurs. - Learn a more »
Social ventures require leadership, funding, expertise, skills and networks to get off the ground, grow and scale. This course will focus on the key strategies for building and leveraging a network of champions to capitalize a social venture at early-stage, and for sustaining and growing that network as the venture grows. This class is applicable to intrapreneurs, changemakers within major institutions, (private or public), board members, impact investors, those who aspire to be senior leaders within social ventures and social entrepreneurs (founders). Co-led by a practicing venture philanthropist and a social entrepreneur, this interactive, pragmatic course will: - Discuss the critical financial and human capital needs of organizations and companies at different life stages. - Explore the concept of champions and the different types of champions including board chairs, co-founders, mentors, faculty advisors, donors, investors, community evangelists, and fellow entrepreneurs. - Learn about effective networks and how to build them, including the role of communications, relationship-building, and crisis management. - Explore the concept of a powerful vulnerability and the art of "influence without authority" in attracting financial and human capital to the mission and making social ventures happen. Special emphasis will be given to developing co-founders and founding teams, boards and funders/investors as champions. - Develop a roadmap for the ways you will support social ventures throughout your career. - Meet social entrepreneurs and their champions who promote them within various power structures (major corporations, government, the institutional funding community) to learn about the successes and failures of their partnerships. Guest speakers will be posted prior to start of class. - Invite you to join instructors, guest speakers and fellow students for casual dinner on both Wednesdays after class.- Get to know your fellow classmates who share a passion for addressing the world's intractable problems and for creating systemic change.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

GSBGEN 514: Creating and Scaling High Potential Ventures in Developing Economies (Cases)

GSBGEN 514 - Creating High Potential Ventures in Developing Economies (2 Units)This course addresses the distinctive challenges and opportunities of launching high-potential new ventures in developing economies. Developing economies are attractive targets for entrepreneurs because many are just starting to move up the growth curve, and they offer low-cost operating environments that can be great development labs for potentially disruptive innovations. They increase in attractiveness when their political institutions stabilize and they become more market-friendly. At the same time, developing economies pose serious challenges. Pioneering entrepreneurs take on significant risks to gain early mover advantages. Specifically, entrepreneurs will not be able to count on the same kind of supportive operating environments that we take for granted in the developed world. They often face cumbersome permit and licensing processes, poorly developed financial and labor markets, problematic import an more »
GSBGEN 514 - Creating High Potential Ventures in Developing Economies (2 Units)This course addresses the distinctive challenges and opportunities of launching high-potential new ventures in developing economies. Developing economies are attractive targets for entrepreneurs because many are just starting to move up the growth curve, and they offer low-cost operating environments that can be great development labs for potentially disruptive innovations. They increase in attractiveness when their political institutions stabilize and they become more market-friendly. At the same time, developing economies pose serious challenges. Pioneering entrepreneurs take on significant risks to gain early mover advantages. Specifically, entrepreneurs will not be able to count on the same kind of supportive operating environments that we take for granted in the developed world. They often face cumbersome permit and licensing processes, poorly developed financial and labor markets, problematic import and export procedures, unreliable local supply chains, weak infrastructure, corruption, currency risks, limited investment capital, lack of financial exits and more. This course is designed to help would-be entrepreneurs - both founders and members of entrepreneurial teams - better understand and prepare for these issues as they pursue the opportunities and address the challenges to start, grow, and harvest their ventures in these environments. GSBGEN 514 is a seminar/discussion format in which students will read about and discuss the key challenges described above and potential solutions. Guests will describe their own startup and investing experiences in developing economies and answer questions. A framework based on the World Economic Forum (WEF) report on "Entrepreneurial Ecosystems Around the Globe and Company Growth Dynamics" will be used to structure the course. Each student will prepare a short write-up as a final assignment on a case chosen from a selection provided by the instructors. Note: Groups of students who want to work as a team to investigate a specific new venture idea in addition to participating in the seminar/discussion sessions should consider enrolling in GSB314.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

GSBGEN 515: Essentials of Strategic Communication

Successful leaders understand the power of authentic, memorable communication.This course uses the lens of oral communication and presentations, to introduce the essential elements of the strategic communication strategies that make authentic, memorable communication work. Focusing on oral communication and presentation, we introduce the essentials of communication strategy and persuasion: audience analysis, message construction, communicator credibility, and delivery. Deliverables include written documents, focusing on individual and team presentations, with students receiving continuous feedback to improve their communication effectiveness, and to sharpen their authentic leadership voice. This highly interactive, practical course, is focused on feedback to help students at all levels of communication mastery develop confidence in their speaking and writing. Course includes presentations, assignments, lectures, discussions, simulated activities, in-class feedback, and filmed feedback. more »
Successful leaders understand the power of authentic, memorable communication.This course uses the lens of oral communication and presentations, to introduce the essential elements of the strategic communication strategies that make authentic, memorable communication work. Focusing on oral communication and presentation, we introduce the essentials of communication strategy and persuasion: audience analysis, message construction, communicator credibility, and delivery. Deliverables include written documents, focusing on individual and team presentations, with students receiving continuous feedback to improve their communication effectiveness, and to sharpen their authentic leadership voice. This highly interactive, practical course, is focused on feedback to help students at all levels of communication mastery develop confidence in their speaking and writing. Course includes presentations, assignments, lectures, discussions, simulated activities, in-class feedback, and filmed feedback. In this course you will learn to: 1) Recognize strategically effective communication 2) Implement the principles of strategic communication across different platforms 3) Develop clearly organized and effective presentations and documents 4) Diagnose and expand, your personal authentic communication style. As you make your super round selection, keep in mind that wait lists have been long for this course.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

GSBGEN 532: Clean Energy Opportunities

This course examines business models and opportunities related to clean energy, specifically to low-carbon energy. We examine emerging trends for this sector in the context of technological change, business opportunities and the parameters set by public policy.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF
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