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11 - 20 of 34 results for: GEOLSCI ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

GEOLSCI 199: Honors Program

Research on a topic of special interest. See "Undergraduate Honors Program" above.nMay be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

GEOLSCI 206: Topics in Organismal Paleobiology

Seminar course covering an area of structural biology, physiology, or ecology relevant to understanding the fossil record, with the topic changing each time the course is offered. Examples of potential topics are biomineralization, fluid mechanics, biomechanics, taphonomy & biochemical preservation, and the functional morphology/fossil history of specific evolutionary groups such as vertebrates, insects, or plants.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit

GEOLSCI 213: Topics in Sedimentary Geology

For upper division undergraduates and graduate students. Topics vary each year but the focus is on current developments and problems in sedimentary geology, sedimentology, Archean geology, and basin analysis. These include issues in deep-water sediments, their origin, facies, and architecture; sedimentary systems on the early Earth; and relationships among tectonics, basin development, and basin fill. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

GEOLSCI 218X: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 118X, CEE 218X, ESS 118X, ESS 218X, GEOLSCI 118X, GEOPHYS 118X, GEOPHYS 218X, POLISCI 224X, PUBLPOL 118X)

The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Changing urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to more »
The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Changing urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to drive responsible systems change in their future careers. The Autumn (X) course is specifically focused on concepts and skills, and completion is a prerequisite for participation in the Winter (Y) and/or Spring (Z) practicum quarters, which engage teams in real-world projects with Bay Area local governments or community groups. X is composed of four modules: (A) participation in two weekly classes which prominently feature experts in research and practice related to urban systems; (B) reading and writing assignments designed to deepen thinking on class topics; (C) fundamental data analysis skills, particularly focused on Excel and ArcGIS, taught in lab sessions through basic exercises; (D) advanced data analysis skills, particularly focused on geocomputation in R, taught through longer and more intensive assignments. X can be taken for 3 units (ABC), 4 units (ACD), or 5 units (ABCD). Open to undergraduate and graduate students in any major. For more information, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

GEOLSCI 222: Planetary Systems: Dynamics and Origins (GEOLSCI 122, GEOPHYS 122)

(Students with a strong background in mathematics and the physical sciences should register for 222.) Motions of planets and smaller bodies, energy transport in planetary systems, composition, structure and dynamics of planetary atmospheres, cratering on planetary surfaces, properties of meteorites, asteroids and comets, extrasolar planets, and planetary formation. Prerequisite: some background in the physical sciences, especially astronomy, geophysics, or physics. Students need instructor approval to take the course for 2 or 4 units.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-4

GEOLSCI 225A: Fundamentals of Geochemical Modeling

A class devoted to geochemical models and the computational and analytical tools required to successfully construct and solve them. Topics include: box models, impulse responses, transfer functions, eigenvalues, advection-diffusion-reaction models, discretization schemes, numerical methods (Euler, Runge-Kutta, Gauss-Seidel), Green's function, Laplace and Fourier transforms. The class will include a final project in which students will have the opportunity to apply the above tools to their own research or a problem of their choice.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

GEOLSCI 248: The Petroleum System: Investigative method to explore for conventional & unconventional hydrocarbons

How the petroleum system concept can be used to more systematically investigate how hydrocarbon fluid becomes an unconventional accumulation in a pod of active source rock and how this fluid moves from this pod to a conventional pool. How to identify, map, and name a petroleum system. The conventional and unconventional accumulation as well as the use of modeling.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

GEOLSCI 251: Sedimentary Basins

Analysis of the sedimentary fill and tectonic evolution of sedimentary basins. Topics: tectonic and environmental controls on depositional systems, detrital composition, burial history, and stratigraphic architecture; synthesis of basin development through time. One weekend field trip required. Prerequisites: 110, 151.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

GEOLSCI 258: Introduction to Depositional Systems

The characteristics of the major sedimentary environments and their deposits in the geologic record, including alluvial fans, braided and meandering rivers, aeolian systems, deltas, open coasts, barred coasts, marine shelves, and deep-water systems. Emphasis is on subdivisions; morphology; the dynamics of modern systems; and the architectural organization and sedimentary structures, textures, and biological components of ancient deposits.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Lowe, D. (PI)

GEOLSCI 259: Stratigraphic Architecture

The stratigraphic architecture of deposits associated with a spectrum of depositional environments, using outcrop and subsurface data. Participants read and discuss selected literature.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: McHargue, T. (PI)
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