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1 - 10 of 51 results for: FINANCE

FINANCE 201: Managerial Finance

This course covers the foundations of finance with an emphasis on applications that are vital for corporate managers. We will discuss many of the major financial decisions made by corporate managers, both within the firm and in their interactions with investors. Essential in most of these decisions is the process of valuation, which will be an important emphasis of the course. Topics include criteria for making investment decisions, valuation of financial assets and liabilities, relationships between risk and return, capital structure choice, payout policy, the use and valuation of derivative securities, and risk management. This course is targeted to those students who are new to finance and for those with little quantitative background.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Jenter, D. (PI)

FINANCE 204: Managerial Finance - Accelerated

This course covers the foundations of finance with an emphasis on applications that are vital for corporate managers. We will discuss many of the major financial decisions made by corporate managers, both within the firm and in their interactions with investors. Essential in most of these decisions is the process of valuation, which will be an important emphasis of the course. Topics include criteria for making investment decisions, valuation of financial assets and liabilities, relationships between risk and return, capital structure choice, the use and valuation of derivative securities (e.g., options and convertible securities), and risk management. This accelerated course is designed for those students who are relatively new to finance but who possess solid quantitative skills.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

FINANCE 211: Corporate Finance: Applications, Techniques, and Models

The focus of this basic course is on the corporate financial manager and how he/she reaches decisions. Topics include: financial modelling; financing methods of various sorts; capital investment; exchange-rate risk management; acquisitions; buyouts; and dealing with financial distress. In addition to corporations, both domestic and foreign, one session will be devoted to financing a non-profit. The course is designed as a natural follow-up to the Winter Quarter Managerial Finance course, and will draw on things learned in that course. F-211 embraces both the big picture€ and rigorous financial analysis. It is applied, but within a conceptual valuation-oriented framework. The primary vehicle of instruction is the case method, supplementednwith lectures. The emphasis throughout is on making a decision on the basis of well supported analyses. Class participation is important, and cold calls will occur with regularity.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: VanHorne, J. (PI)

FINANCE 332: Finance and Society

This interdisciplinary course will discuss the role of the financial system within the broader economy and the interactions between the financial industry and the rest of society. The course will provide an overview of the financial system, cover the basic economic principles essential for understanding the role of finance in the economy, and discuss of policy issues around financial regulation. It seeks to mix students from GSB, Law School, Public Policy, Economics, Political Science, and other departments. Topics to be discussed include: * The financial system, from microfinance to global megabanks: how and why finance can benefit society as well as endanger and harm. * Financial regulation: why and how? * Other people's money: the challenge of effective control, governance, and trust. * The politics of banking and finance. * Ethical issues in finance.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Admati, A. (PI)

FINANCE 336: The Finance of Retirement and Pensions

The financial economics of how retirement is financed, particularly in the US. Topics: basic finance concepts necessary for understanding individual retirement savings. Properties of financial instruments such as bonds and stocks. Optimization of individual retirement account or 401(k) portfolios. Defined benefit pensions. Measuring defined benefit pension liabilities. Impact of defined benefit pension liabilities on corporate, state, and local budgeting. The economics of national retirement policy including Social Security and government treatment of private retirement savings.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

FINANCE 350: Corporate Financial Modeling

The course will take the perspective of a mid-level manager or decision-maker who is responsible for collecting, analyzing, and utilizing financial information in the context of a major transaction. We will integrate theories presented throughout courses in the core, particularly accounting and finance, and take a hands-on approach to understand how the theory is implemented in practice. The focus of the course will be on developing critical financial modeling skills, understanding best practices, and recognizing common pitfalls. Students will work on a series of cases and build models that can be used for earnings and pro-forma financial statement forecasts, valuation, the assessment of financing needs, merger analysis, and LBO evaluation. Students will also gain experience presenting financial models and critically assessing them. By the conclusion of the course, students will develop the skills to construct complex financial models and the logical frameworks to utilize them for various organizational applications. [Note: This course is geared toward students relatively new to financial modeling; those with extensive financial modeling backgrounds may be better served by an alternative course.]
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: DeMarzo, P. (PI)

FINANCE 373: Entrepreneurial Finance

This is a course about the financial decision-making process for start-up firms. The course takes a two-pronged approach: First, we develop tools and concepts of corporate finance related to modeling, valuation, control, and investment decisions within an entrepreneurial context. Second, we use cases with firms at different stages of their life cycle from initial angel or venture capital investments through exit decisions, to see the issues that arise when these principles are applied in practice. In some cases we take the viewpoint of the entrepreneur and in others the viewpoint of the investor. After all, as an entrepreneur, you cannot negotiate effectively without understanding the investor's motivations. Conversely, you cannot evaluate a potential investment opportunity without appreciating the entrepreneur's perspective and incentives. Finally, we explore new developments in entrepreneurial finance such as crowdfunding and early liquidity provision.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

FINANCE 555: Private Wealth Management and Private Investing

The Private Wealth Management and Private Investing course will address issues that relate to the management of personal assets as opposed to institutional investing. It will cover the historical origins and growth of private wealth management, investment planning, risk management, inter-generational transfers of wealth, philanthropy and tax planning. Classes will focus on case studies and various readings. Two instructors will lead the class, one from the GSB and one from the private wealth management industry. Most classes will be augmented by visits from professionals in the wealth management and private banking business. Active class participation and a group project are required.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

FINANCE 559: The World of Investing

This is a 9-week speaker series, exposing students to the world of first-class public market investors. Each week will have a different visitor describing their investment philosophy, strategy and experience. Full attendance is a requirement to pass the course. Absences must be explicitly excused.
Units: 1 | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail

FINANCE 587: Private Equity - An Overview of the Industry

This 2-unit elective at the GSB is an analytical review and overview of private equity partnerships. The course looks at all aspects of private equity investing and may be of interest to five groups of students: (i) students who aspire to be employed in private equity as a career; (ii) students who plan to be employed by operating companies that are owned by private equity firms; (iii) students who may invest in private equity partnerships as a limited partner; (iv) students who find private equity to be an interesting part of the financial community in general (v) students who expect to participate in corporate business development or mergers and acquisitions. The course will meet for nine classes, most for a duration of 90 minutes. One class will be a mock investment review committee presentation as a final project.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF
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