2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

41 - 50 of 70 results for: ESS ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

ESS 227: Decision Science for Environmental Threats (EARTHSYS 227)

Decision science is the study of how people make decisions. It aims to describe these processes in ways that will help people make better or more well-informed decisions. It is an interdisciplinary field that draws upon psychology, economics, political science, and management, among other disciplines. It is being used in a number of domain areas and for a variety of applications, including managing freshwater resources, designing decision support tools to aid in coastal adaptation to sea-level rise, and creating `nudges¿ to enhance energy efficiency behaviors. This course covers behavioral theories of probabilistic inference, intuitive prediction, preference, and decision making. Topics include heuristics and biases, risk perceptions and attitudes, strategies for combining different sources of information and dealing with conflicting objectives, and the roles of group and emotional processes in decision making. This course will introduce students to foundational theories of decision science, and will involve applying these theories to understand decisions about environmental threats.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

ESS 239: Data science for geoscience (EARTHSYS 140, EARTHSYS 240, ENERGY 240, GEOLSCI 140, GEOLSCI 240)

Overview of some of the most important data science methods (statistics, machine learning & computer vision) relevant for geological sciences, as well as other fields in the Earth Sciences. Areas covered are: extreme value statistics for predicting rare events; compositional data analysis for geochemistry; multivariate analysis for designing data & computer experiments; probabilistic aggregation of evidence for spatial mapping; functional data analysis for multivariate environmental datasets, spatial regression and modeling spatial uncertainty with covariate information (geostatistics). Identification & learning of geo-objects with computer vision. Focus on practicality rather than theory. Matlab exercises on realistic data problems.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Caers, J. (PI)

ESS 241: Remote Sensing of the Oceans (EARTHSYS 141, EARTHSYS 241, ESS 141, GEOPHYS 141)

How to observe and interpret physical and biological changes in the oceans using satellite technologies. Topics: principles of satellite remote sensing, classes of satellite remote sensors, converting radiometric data into biological and physical quantities, sensor calibration and validation, interpreting large-scale oceanographic features.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR
Instructors: Arrigo, K. (PI)

ESS 243: Molecular Geomicrobiology Laboratory (BIO 142, EARTHSYS 143, ESS 143)

In this course, students will be studying the biosynthesis of cyclic lipid biomarkers, molecules that are produced by modern microbes that can be preserved in rocks that are over a billion years old and which geologist use as molecular fossils. Students will be tasked with identifying potential biomarker lipid synthesis genes in environmental genomic databases, expressing those genes in a model bacterial expression system in the lab, and then analyzing the lipid products that are produced. The overall goal is for students to experience the scientific research process including generating hypotheses, testing these hypotheses in laboratory experiments, and communicating their results through a publication style paper. Prerequisites: BIO83 and CHEM35 or permission of the instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Welander, P. (PI)

ESS 246A: Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: The Atmospheric Circulation (CEE 161I, CEE 261I, EARTHSYS 146A)

Introduction to the physics governing the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean and their control on climate with emphasis on the atmospheric circulation. Topics include the global energy balance, the greenhouse effect, the vertical and meridional structure of the atmosphere, dry and moist convection, the equations of motion for the atmosphere and ocean, including the effects of rotation, and the poleward transport of heat by the large-scale atmospheric circulation and storm systems. Prerequisites: MATH 51 or CME100 and PHYSICS 41.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

ESS 246B: Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: the Ocean Circulation (CEE 162I, CEE 262I, EARTHSYS 146B)

Introduction to the physics governing the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean and their control on climate with emphasis on the large-scale ocean circulation. This course will give an overview of the structure and dynamics of the major ocean current systems that contribute to the meridional overturning circulation, the transport of heat, salt, and biogeochemical tracers, and the regulation of climate. Topics include the tropical ocean circulation, the wind-driven gyres and western boundary currents, the thermohaline circulation, the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, water mass formation, atmosphere-ocean coupling, and climate variability. Prerequisites: MATH 51 or CME100; and PHYSICS 41; and a course that introduces the equations of fluid motion (e.g. ESS 246A, ESS 148, or CEE 101B).
Terms: Win | Units: 3

ESS 251: Biological Oceanography (EARTHSYS 151, EARTHSYS 251, ESS 151)

Required for Earth Systems students in the oceans track. Interdisciplinary look at how oceanic environments control the form and function of marine life. Topics include distributions of planktonic production and abundance, nutrient cycling, the role of ocean biology in the climate system, expected effects of climate changes on ocean biology. Local weekend field trips. Designed to be taken concurrently with Marine Chemistry (ESS/ EARTHSYS 152/252). Prerequisites: BIO 43 and ESS 8 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Arrigo, K. (PI)

ESS 252: Marine Chemistry (EARTHSYS 152, EARTHSYS 252, ESS 152)

Introduction to the interdisciplinary knowledge and skills required to critically evaluate problems in marine chemistry and related disciplines. Physical, chemical, and biological processes that determine the chemical composition of seawater. Air-sea gas exchange, carbonate chemistry, and chemical equilibria, nutrient and trace element cycling, particle reactivity, sediment chemistry, and diagenesis. Examination of chemical tracers of mixing and circulation and feedbacks of ocean processes on atmospheric chemistry and climate. Designed to be taken concurrently with Biological Oceanography (ESS/ EARTHSYS 151/251)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4

ESS 255: Microbial Physiology (BIO 180, EARTHSYS 255, GEOLSCI 233A)

Introduction to the physiology of microbes including cellular structure, transcription and translation, growth and metabolism, mechanisms for stress resistance and the formation of microbial communities. These topics will be covered in relation to the evolution of early life on Earth, ancient ecosystems, and the interpretation of the rock record. Recommended: introductory biology and chemistry.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

ESS 256: Soil and Water Chemistry (EARTHSYS 256)

(Graduate students register for 256.) Practical and quantitative treatment of soil processes affecting chemical reactivity, transformation, retention, and bioavailability. Principles of primary areas of soil chemistry: inorganic and organic soil components, complex equilibria in soil solutions, and adsorption phenomena at the solid-water interface. Processes and remediation of acid, saline, and wetland soils. Recommended: soil science and introductory chemistry and microbiology.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Fendorf, S. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints