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31 - 40 of 70 results for: ESS ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

ESS 209: Biological and Social Networks (ESS 109)

This course introduces the analysis of social and biological networks with a focus on field data collected by interdisciplinary environmental and health scientists. Beginning from the premise that structure emerges from relationships between individual entities, we will concentrate in particular on the measurement of relationships, emphasizing especially practical methodology for mixed-method fieldwork suitable for interdisciplinary biosocial sciences (e.g., earth system science, epidemiology, demography, anthropology, conservation science). Topics include: social relationships in humans and other animals, ecological networks (e.g., trophic and mutualistic interactions), epidemiological networks, research design for collecting relational data, naturalistic observation, ethnographic network methods, sampling, data quality, missing data, graphs and graph theory, structural measures (e.g., density, centrality and centralization, clustering and community detection, embeddedness), network evolution, network diffusion, emergence, egocentric networks, multi-mode/multi-layer networks, inference for sampled networks. All computation and visualization will be done in R so some familiarity is assumed.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Jones, J. (PI)

ESS 210: Techniques in Environmental Microbiology

Fundamentals and application of laboratory techniques to study the diversity and activity of microorganisms in environmental samples, including soil, sediment, and water. Emphasis is on culture-independent approaches, including epifluorescence microscopy, extraction and analysis of major biomolecules (DNA, RNA, protein, lipids), stable isotope probing, and metabolic rate measurements. Format will include lectures, laboratory exercises, and discussions. Students will learn how to collect, analyze, and understand common and cutting-edge datasets in environmental microbiology. Permission from instructor is required to enroll as C/NC or for 3 units.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Dekas, A. (PI)

ESS 212: Measurements in Earth Systems (EARTHSYS 124)

A classroom, laboratory, and field class designed to provide students familiarity with techniques and instrumentation used to track biological, chemical, and physical processes operating in earth systems, encompassing upland, aquatic, estuarine, and marine environments. Topics include gas and water flux measurement, nutrient and isotopic analysis, soil and water chemistry determination. Students will develop and test hypotheses, provide scientific evidence and analysis, culminating in a final presentation.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4

ESS 213: Global Change and Emerging Infectious Disease (EARTHSYS 114, EARTHSYS 214, HUMBIO 114)

The changing epidemiological environment. How human-induced environmental changes, such as global warming, deforestation and land-use conversion, urbanization, international commerce, and human migration, are altering the ecology of infectious disease transmission, and promoting their re-emergence as a global public health threat. Case studies of malaria, cholera, hantavirus, plague, and HIV.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5

ESS 218X: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 118X, CEE 218X, ESS 118X, GEOLSCI 118X, GEOLSCI 218X, GEOPHYS 118X, GEOPHYS 218X, POLISCI 224X, PUBLPOL 118X)

The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Changing urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to more »
The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Changing urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to drive responsible systems change in their future careers. The Autumn (X) course is specifically focused on concepts and skills, and completion is a prerequisite for participation in the Winter (Y) and/or Spring (Z) practicum quarters, which engage teams in real-world projects with Bay Area local governments or community groups. X is composed of four modules: (A) participation in two weekly classes which prominently feature experts in research and practice related to urban systems; (B) reading and writing assignments designed to deepen thinking on class topics; (C) fundamental data analysis skills, particularly focused on Excel and ArcGIS, taught in lab sessions through basic exercises; (D) advanced data analysis skills, particularly focused on geocomputation in R, taught through longer and more intensive assignments. X can be taken for 3 units (ABC), 4 units (ACD), or 5 units (ABCD). Open to undergraduate and graduate students in any major. For more information, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

ESS 218Y: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 118Y, CEE 218Y, ESS 118Y, GEOPHYS 118Y, GEOPHYS 218Y)

Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered and may span both Winter and Spring quarters; students are welcome to participate in one or both quarters. Students are expected to interact professionally with government and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. Prerequisite: the Autumn (X) skills course or approval of instructors. For information about the projects and application process, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5

ESS 220: Physical Hydrogeology (CEE 260A)

(Formerly GES 230.) Theory of underground water occurrence and flow, analysis of field data and aquifer tests, geologic groundwater environments, solution of field problems, and groundwater modeling. Introduction to groundwater contaminant transport and unsaturated flow. Lab. Prerequisite: elementary calculus.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

ESS 221: Contaminant Hydrogeology and Reactive Transport (CEE 260C)

Decades of industrial activity have released vast quantities of contaminants to groundwater, threatening water resources, ecosystems and human health. What processes control the fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface? What remediation strategies are effective and what are the tradeoffs among them? How are these processes represented in models used for regulatory and decision-making purposes? This course will address these and related issues by focusing on the conceptual and quantitative treatment of advective-dispersive transport with reacting solutes, including modern methods of contaminant transport simulation. Some Matlab programming / program modification required. Prerequisite: Physical Hydrogeology ESS 220 / CEE 260A (Gorelick) or equivalent and college-level course work in chemistry.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

ESS 223: Biosphere-Atmosphere Interactions (EARTHSYS 123A, EARTHSYS 223, ESS 123)

How do ecosystems respond to climate, and how do ecosystems influence climate? Covers the role of the terrestrial land surface in earth's climate system, including among others photosynthesis, transpiration, greenhouse gasses, radiation, and atmospheric water vapor. For each of these topics, attention is paid to both the underlying processes and how they can be mathematically represented in earth system models. Instruments and techniques used to measure these processes are also discussed, and, where appropriate, demonstrated.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4

ESS 224: Remote Sensing of Hydrology (CEE 260D)

This class discusses the methods available for remote sensing of the components of the terrestrial hydrologic cycle and how to use them. Topics include the hydrologic cycle, relevant sensor types and the electromagnetic spectrum, active/passive microwave remote sensing (snow, soil moisture, canopy water content, rainfall), thermal sensing of evapotranspiration, gravity and hyperspectral methods, as well as an introduction to data assimilation and calibration/validation approaches for hydrologic variables. Pre-requisite: programming experience.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Konings, A. (PI)
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