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21 - 30 of 70 results for: ESS ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

ESS 155: Science of Soils (EARTHSYS 155)

Physical, chemical, and biological processes within soil systems. Emphasis is on factors governing nutrient availability, plant growth and production, land-resource management, and pollution within soils. How to classify soils and assess nutrient cycling and contaminant fate. Recommended: introductory chemistry and biology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Fendorf, S. (PI)

ESS 162: Remote Sensing of Land (EARTHSYS 142, EARTHSYS 242, ESS 262)

The use of satellite remote sensing to monitor land use and land cover, with emphasis on terrestrial changes. Topics include pre-processing data, biophysical properties of vegetation observable by satellite, accuracy assessment of maps derived from remote sensing, and methodologies to detect changes such as urbanization, deforestation, vegetation health, and wildfires.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR
Instructors: Lyons, E. (PI)

ESS 164: Fundamentals of Geographic Information Science (GIS) (EARTHSYS 144)

Survey of geographic information including maps, satellite imagery, and census data, approaches to spatial data, and tools for integrating and examining spatially-explicit data. Emphasis is on fundamental concepts of geographic information science and associated technologies. Topics include geographic data structure, cartography, remotely sensed data, statistical analysis of geographic data, spatial analysis, map design, and geographic information system software. Computer lab assignments. All students are required to attend a weekly lab session.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR

ESS 165: Advanced Geographic Information Systems (ESS 265)

Building on the Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems course, this class delves deeper into geospatial analysis and mapping techniques. The class is heavily project-based and students are encouraged to bring their own research questions. Topics include topographic analysis, interpolation, spatial statistics, network analysis, and scripting using Python and Acrpy. All students are required to attend a weekly lab. ESS 164 or equivalent is a prerequisite.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Lyons, E. (PI)

ESS 170: Analyzing land use in a globalized world (ESS 270)

This course examines the dynamics of land use in relation to globalization. The objective is to understand how the expansion of global trade, and public and private regulations affect land use changes. The course will enable students to better understand how to effectively influence land use change, from different vantage points (government, NGO, corporate actor¿). The main emphasis is on tropical regions. Lectures introduce theories, practical cases, and evaluation tools to better understand contemporary land use dynamics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Lambin, E. (PI)

ESS 179S: Seminar: Issues in Environmental Science, Technology and Sustainability (CEE 179S, CEE 279S, EARTHSYS 179S)

Invited faculty, researchers and professionals share their insights and perspectives on a broad range of environmental and sustainability issues. Students critique seminar presentations and associated readings.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit

ESS 202: Scientific Basis of Climate Change (ESS 102)

This course explores the scientific basis of anthropogenic climate change. We will read the original papers that established the scientific foundation for the climate change forecast. Starting with Fourier¿s description of the greenhouse effect, we trace the history of the key insights into how humanity is perturbing the climate system. The course is based on ¿The Warming Papers,¿ edited by David Archer and Raymond Pierrehumbert. Participants take turns presenting and leading a discussion of the papers and of Archer and Pierrehumbert¿s commentary.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5

ESS 204: Effective Scientific Presentation and Public Speaking (GEOLSCI 306, GEOPHYS 205)

The ability to present your work in a compelling, concise, and engaging manner will enhance your professional career. This course breaks down presentations into their key elements: the opening, body of the talk, closing, slide and poster graphics, Q&A, pacing, pauses, and voice modulation. The class is a series of several minute log stand-and-deliver exercises in which you get immediate class feedback and then re-do it on the fly. In addition, each participant will use their upcoming conference talk or poster (e.g., AGU, SEG), or upcoming job talk or funding pitch, as a final project. In addition to the class sessions, I will spend 60-90 min with each student individually. Everyone will come away a more skilled and confident speaker than they were before. Instructor: Ross S. Stein (Temblor.net, Emeritus USGS). The course syllabus can be found at http://temblor.net/team/ross-stein/
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: Stein, R. (PI)

ESS 206: World Food Economy (EARTHSYS 106, EARTHSYS 206, ECON 106, ECON 206, ESS 106)

The economics of food production, consumption, and trade. The micro- and macro- determinants of food supply and demand, including the interrelationship among food, income, population, and public-sector decision making. Emphasis on the role of agriculture in poverty alleviation, economic development, and environmental outcomes. Grades based on mid-term exam and group modeling project and presentation. Enrollment is by application only and will be capped at 25, with priority given to upper level undergraduates in Economics and Earth Systems and graduate students (graduate students enroll in 206).
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Naylor, R. (PI)

ESS 208: Topics in Geobiology (GEOLSCI 208)

Reading course addressing current topics in geobiology. Topics will vary from year to year, but will generally cover areas of current debate in the primary literature, such as the origin of life, the origin and consequences of oxygenic photosynthesis, environmental controls on and consequences of metabolic innovations in microbes, the early evolution of animals and plants, and the causes and consequences of major extinction events. Participants will be expected to read and present on current papers in the primary literature.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Welander, P. (PI)
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