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1 - 10 of 42 results for: ENGR

ENGR 14: Intro to Solid Mechanics

Introduction to engineering analysis using the principles of engineering solid mechanics. Builds on the math and physical reasoning concepts in Physics 41 to develop skills in evaluation of engineered systems across a variety of fields. Foundational ideas for more advanced solid mechanics courses such as ME80 or CEE101A. Interactive lecture sessions focused on mathematical application of key concepts, with weekly complementary lab session on testing and designing systems that embody these concepts. Limited enrollment, subject to instructor approval. Pre-requisite: Physics 41.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci

ENGR 15: Dynamics

The application of Newton's Laws to solve 2-D and 3-D static and dynamic problems, particle and rigid body dynamics, freebody diagrams, and equations of motion, with application to mechanical, biomechanical, and aerospace systems. Computer numerical solution and dynamic response. Prerequisites: Calculus (differentiation and integration) such as MATH 41; and ENGR 14 (statics and strength) or a mechanics course in physics such as PHYSICS 41.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA

ENGR 20: Introduction to Chemical Engineering (CHEMENG 20)

Overview of chemical engineering through discussion and engineering analysis of physical and chemical processes. Topics: overall staged separations, material and energy balances, concepts of rate processes, energy and mass transport, and kinetics of chemical reactions. Applications of these concepts to areas of current technological importance: biotechnology, energy, production of chemicals, materials processing, and purification. Prerequisite: CHEM 31.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

ENGR 40M: An Intro to Making: What is EE

Is a hands-on class where students learn to make stuff. Through the process of building, you are introduced to the basic areas of EE. Students build a "useless box" and learn about circuits, feedback, and programming hardware, a light display for your desk and bike and learn about coding, transforms, and LEDs, a solar charger and an EKG machine and learn about power, noise, feedback, more circuits, and safety. And you get to keep the toys you build. Prerequisite: CS 106A.
Terms: Aut, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA

ENGR 50: Introduction to Materials Science, Nanotechnology Emphasis

The structure, bonding, and atomic arrangements in materials leading to their properties and applications. Topics include electronic and mechanical behavior, emphasizing nanotechnology, solid state devices, and advanced structural and composite materials.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

ENGR 60: Engineering Economics and Sustainability (CEE 146S)

Engineering Economics is a subset of the field of economics that draws upon the logic of economics, but adds that analytical power of mathematics and statistics. The concepts developed in this course are broadly applicable to many professional and personal decisions, including making purchasing decisions, deciding between project alternatives, evaluating different processes, and balancing environmental and social costs against economic costs. The concepts taught in this course will be increasingly valuable as students climb the carrier ladder in private industry, a non-governmental organization, a public agency, or in founding their own startup. Eventually, the ability to make informed decisions that are based in fundamental analysis of alternatives is a part of every career. As such, this course is recommended for engineering and non-engineering students alike. This course is taught exclusively online in every quarter it is offered. (Prerequisites: MATH 19 or 20 or approved equivalent.)
Terms: Aut, Spr, Sum | Units: 3
Instructors: Lepech, M. (PI)

ENGR 62: Introduction to Optimization (MS&E 111, MS&E 211)

Formulation and computational analysis of linear, quadratic, and other convex optimization problems. Applications in machine learning, operations, marketing, finance, and economics. Prerequisite: CME 100 or MATH 51.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci

ENGR 70A: Programming Methodology (CS 106A)

Introduction to the engineering of computer applications emphasizing modern software engineering principles: object-oriented design, decomposition, encapsulation, abstraction, and testing. Emphasis is on good programming style and the built-in facilities of respective languages. No prior programming experience required. Alternative versions of CS106A may be available which cover most of the same material but in different programming languages.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR

ENGR 70B: Programming Abstractions (CS 106B)

Abstraction and its relation to programming. Software engineering principles of data abstraction and modularity. Object-oriented programming, fundamental data structures (such as stacks, queues, sets) and data-directed design. Recursion and recursive data structures (linked lists, trees, graphs). Introduction to time and space complexity analysis. Uses the programming language C++ covering its basic facilities. Prerequisite: 106A or equivalent.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR

ENGR 80: Introduction to Bioengineering (Engineering Living Matter) (BIOE 80)

Students completing BIOE.80 should have a working understanding for how to approach the systematic engineering of living systems to benefit all people and the planet. Our main goals are (1) to help students learn ways of thinking about engineering living matter and (2) to empower students to explore the broader ramifications of engineering life. Specific concepts and skills covered include but are not limited to: capacities of natural life on Earth; scope of the existing human-directed bioeconomy; deconstructing complicated problems; reaction & diffusion systems; microbial human anatomy; conceptualizing the engineering of biology; how atoms can be organized to make molecules; how to print DNA from scratch; programming genetic sensors, logic, & actuators; biology beyond molecules (photons, electrons, etc.); what constraints limit what life can do?; what will be the major health challenges in 2030?; how does what we want shape bioengineering?; who should choose and realize various competing bioengineering futures?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR
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