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71 - 80 of 93 results for: ENGR

ENGR 240: Introduction to Micro and Nano Electromechanical Systems

Miniaturization technologies now have important roles in materials, mechanical, and biomedical engineering practice, in addition to being the foundation for information technology. This course will target an audience of first-year engineering graduate students and motivated senior-level undergraduates, with the goal of providing an introduction to M/NEMS fabrication techniques, selected device applications, and the design tradeoffs in developing systems. The course has no specific prerequisites, other than graduate or senior standing in engineering; otherwise, students will require permission of the instructors.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

ENGR 241: Advanced Micro and Nano Fabrication Laboratory

This project course focuses on developing processes for ExFab, a shared facility that supports flexible lithography, heterogeneous integration, and rapid micro prototyping. Team projects are approved by the instructor and are mentored by an ExFab staff member. Students will plan and execute experiments and document them in a final presentation and report, to be made available on the lab's Wiki for the benefit of the Stanford research community. This year's offering of ENGR241 will span two quarters: students interested in taking this course must sign up for both fall and winter courses, and will be researching a single project over that time. Students must consult with Prof. Fan or the SNF staff before signing up. For Autumn 18-19, the course will meet from 4:00pm-5:50pm in Allen 101X (note the start time).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)
Instructors: Fan, J. (PI)

ENGR 243: LAW, TECHNOLOGY, AND LIBERTY (BIOE 242)

New technologies from gene editing to networked computing have already transformed our economic and social structures and are increasingly changing what it means to be human. What role has law played in regulating and shaping these technologies? And what role can and should it play in the future? This seminar will consider these and related questions, focusing on new forms of networked production, the new landscape of security and scarcity, and the meaning of human nature and ecology in an era of rapid technological change. Readings will be drawn from a range of disciplines, including science and engineering, political economy, and law. The course will feature several guest speakers. There are no formal prerequisites in either engineering or law, but students should be committed to pursuing novel questions in an interdisciplinary context. The enrollment goal is to balance the class composition between law and non-law students. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, more »
New technologies from gene editing to networked computing have already transformed our economic and social structures and are increasingly changing what it means to be human. What role has law played in regulating and shaping these technologies? And what role can and should it play in the future? This seminar will consider these and related questions, focusing on new forms of networked production, the new landscape of security and scarcity, and the meaning of human nature and ecology in an era of rapid technological change. Readings will be drawn from a range of disciplines, including science and engineering, political economy, and law. The course will feature several guest speakers. There are no formal prerequisites in either engineering or law, but students should be committed to pursuing novel questions in an interdisciplinary context. The enrollment goal is to balance the class composition between law and non-law students. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. This course is cross-listed with the School of Engineering (TBA). May be repeat for credit
Last offered: Winter 2017 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)

ENGR 245: The Lean LaunchPad: Getting Your Lean Startup Off the Ground

Learn how to turn a technical idea from a lab, research, or vision into a successful business using the Lean Launchpad process (business model canvas, customer development, running experiments, and agile engineering.) Hands-on experiential class. 15+ hours per week talking to customers, regulators and partners outside the classroom, plus time building minimal viable products. This class is the basis of the National Science Foundation I-Corps ¿ with a focus on understanding all the components to build for deep technology and life science applications. Team applications required in March. Proposals may be software, hardware, or service of any kind. See course website http://leanlaunchpad.stanford.edu/. Prerequisite: interest in and passion for exploring whether your technology idea can become a real company. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3-4

ENGR 248: Principled Entrepreneurial Decisions (ENGR 148)

Examines how leaders tackle significant events that occur in high-growth entrepreneurial companies. Students prepare their minds for the difficult entrepreneurial situations that they will encounter in their lives in whatever their chosen career. Cases and guest speakers discuss not only the business rationale for the decisions taken but also how their principles affected those decisions. The teaching team brings its wealth of experience in both entrepreneurship and VC investing to the class. Previous entrepreneurship coursework or experience preferred. Limited enrollment. Admission by application: http://web.stanford.edu/class/engr248/apply.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Fuchs, J. (PI)

ENGR 250: Data Challenge Lab

In this lab, students develop the practical skills of data science by solving a series of increasingly difficult, real problems. Skills developed include: data manipulation, exploratory data analysis, data visualization, and predictive modeling. The data challenges each student undertakes are based upon their current skills. Students receive one-on-one coaching and see how expert practitioners solve the same challenges. Prerequisite: ENGR150. Limited enrollment; application required. May be repeated for credit. See http://datalab.stanford.edu for more information.
Last offered: Spring 2017

ENGR 277A: Engineering and Sustainable Development: Toolkit (CEE 177X, CEE 277X, ENGR 177A)

The first of a two-quarter, project-based course sequence that address cultural, sociopolitical, organizational, technical, and ethical issues at the heart of implementing sustainable engineering projects in a developing world. Students work in interdisciplinary project teams to tackle real-world design challenges in partnership with social entrepreneurs, local communities, and/or NGOs. While students must have the skills and aptitude necessary to make meaningful contributions to technical product designs, the course is open to all backgrounds and majors. The first quarter focuses on cultural awareness, ethical implications, user requirements, conceptual design, feasibility analysis, and implementation planning. Admission is by application. Students should plan to enroll in CEE 177S/277S ( ENGR 177B/277B) Engineering & Sustainable Development: Implementation following successful completion of this course. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service. To satisfy a Ways requirement, students must register for an undergraduate course number ( CEE 177S or ENGR 177A) and this course must be taken for at least 3 units. In AY 2020-21, a letter grade or `CR' grade satisfies the Ways requirement.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 20 times (up to 20 units total)

ENGR 277B: Engineering and Sustainable Development (CEE 177S, CEE 277S, ENGR 177B)

The second of a two-quarter, project-based course sequence that address cultural, political, organizational, technical and business issues at the heart of implementing sustainable engineering projects in the developing world. Students work in interdisciplinary project teams to tackle real-world design challenges in partnership with social entrepreneurs and/or NGOs. This quarter focuses on implementation, evaluation, and deployment of the designs developed in the winter quarter. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 15 units total)

ENGR 280: From Play to Innovation

Focus is on enhancing the innovation process with playfulness. The class will be project-based and team-centered. We will investigate the human "state of play" to reach an understanding of its principal attributes and how important it is to creative thinking. We will explore play behavior, its development, and its biological basis. We will then apply those principles through design thinking to promote innovation in the corporate world. Students will work with real-world partners on design projects with widespread application. This course requires an application. You can find the application here: dschool.stanford.edu/classes
Last offered: Spring 2020

ENGR 281: d.media - Designing Media that Matters

The combination of always-on smartphones, instant access to information and global social sharing is changing behavior and shifting cultural norms. How can we design digital experiences that make this change positive? Join the d.media team and find out! This course is project-based and hands-on. Three projects will explore visual design, interaction design and behavioral design all in the context of today's technology landscape and in service of a socially positive user experience. See http://dmedia.stanford.edu, Admission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Last offered: Winter 2020
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