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ENGLISH 5F: WISE: Serial Children's Literature: Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events

In this course we will look at Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events as a multi-genre block-busting phenomenon in its own right and as a case study in seriality and children's literature. Reading books 1-13 alongside research on literary markets and adolescent development we'll ask: How do we write about literature that exists simultaneously at the scale of a single novel and a series? What literary and socialpsychological theories help us make meaning of these texts? What audiences, and what needs within those audiences, did the series speak to in its cultural moment? What methods are appropriate for answering what questions? As we explore the world of best-sellers and book deals alongside questions of "appropriateness" and popularity we will engage various methodological angles, including literary critical, digital humanities, and sociological approaches. (No previous experience in sociology or digital humanities is required.) Final research projects may be produced on any more »
In this course we will look at Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events as a multi-genre block-busting phenomenon in its own right and as a case study in seriality and children's literature. Reading books 1-13 alongside research on literary markets and adolescent development we'll ask: How do we write about literature that exists simultaneously at the scale of a single novel and a series? What literary and socialpsychological theories help us make meaning of these texts? What audiences, and what needs within those audiences, did the series speak to in its cultural moment? What methods are appropriate for answering what questions? As we explore the world of best-sellers and book deals alongside questions of "appropriateness" and popularity we will engage various methodological angles, including literary critical, digital humanities, and sociological approaches. (No previous experience in sociology or digital humanities is required.) Final research projects may be produced on any text or texts related to course themes.nNote: This Writing-Intensive Seminar in English (WISE) course fulfills WIM for English majors. Non-majors are welcome, space permitting. Enrollment is by permission (contact vbeebe@stanford.edu). For more information go to https://english.stanford.edu/writing-intensive-seminars-english-wise.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: Nomura, N. (PI)
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