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1 - 5 of 5 results for: ENGLISH115

ENGLISH 115: Virtual Italy (CLASSICS 115, HISTORY 238C, ITALIAN 115)

Classical Italy attracted thousands of travelers throughout the 1700s. Referring to their journey as the "Grand Tour," travelers pursued intellectual passions, promoted careers, and satisfied wanderlust, all while collecting antiquities to fill museums and estates back home. What can computational approaches tell us about who traveled, where and why? We will read travel accounts; experiment with parsing; and visualize historical data. Final projects to form credited contributions to the Grand Tour Project, a cutting-edge digital platform. No prior programming experience necessary.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, WAY-A-II

ENGLISH 115C: Hamlet and the Critics (TAPS 151C)

Focus is on Shakespeare's Hamlet as a site of rich critical controversy from the eighteenth century to the present. Aim is to read, discuss, and evaluate different approaches to the play, from biographical, theatrical, and psychological to formalist, materialist, feminist, new historicist, and, most recently, quantitative. The ambition is to see whether there can be great literature without (a) great (deal of) criticism. The challenge is to understand the theory of literature through the study of its criticism.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Lupic, I. (PI)

ENGLISH 115E: Shakespeare and his Contexts: Race, Religion, Sexuality, Gender

Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Parker, P. (PI)

ENGLISH 115F: Tragedy: Forms and Conflicts (TAPS 115F)

This course introduces students to central questions of tragedy. Why do we find tragic spectacle so compelling, even pleasurable? What role does conflict play in individual selfhood and social formation? And why does tragedy elicit such strong theoretical and philosophical responses? At the same time, the course provides an introduction to literary history through the study of genre. What might connect modern tragedy to ancient Greek drama? How are genres transformed through reading, commentary, and adaptation? The course will be based on close reading and discussion of authors including Sophocles, Seneca, Shakespeare, Calderon, Milton, and Buchner.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ENGLISH 115G: Shakespeare: Five Tragedies

Readings of five plays: Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth, and Antony and Cleopatra. We will begin with a brief overview of Shakespeare's life and times and the theatrical conditions he worked within. However, our efforts will be focused primarily on direct engagement with Shakespeare's plays themselves. Sessions will include discussions of Shakespearean tragic language, reading aloud of specific scenes, and exploration of what unites and differentiates these plays. Finally, we will reflect continuously on what makes tragedy such a strange, rich and necessary form, where (as one philosopher wrote) ¿in suffering failure, the loser conquers.¿
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Jenkins, N. (PI)
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