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91 - 100 of 241 results for: ENGLISH

ENGLISH 115C: Hamlet and the Critics (TAPS 151C)

Focus is on Shakespeare's Hamlet as a site of rich critical controversy from the eighteenth century to the present. Aim is to read, discuss, and evaluate different approaches to the play, from biographical, theatrical, and psychological to formalist, materialist, feminist, new historicist, and, most recently, quantitative. The ambition is to see whether there can be great literature without (a) great (deal of) criticism. The challenge is to understand the theory of literature through the study of its criticism.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Lupic, I. (PI)

ENGLISH 115E: Shakespeare and his Contexts: Race, Religion, Sexuality, Gender

Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Parker, P. (PI)

ENGLISH 115F: Tragedy: Forms and Conflicts (TAPS 115F)

This course introduces students to central questions of tragedy. Why do we find tragic spectacle so compelling, even pleasurable? What role does conflict play in individual selfhood and social formation? And why does tragedy elicit such strong theoretical and philosophical responses? At the same time, the course provides an introduction to literary history through the study of genre. What might connect modern tragedy to ancient Greek drama? How are genres transformed through reading, commentary, and adaptation? The course will be based on close reading and discussion of authors including Sophocles, Seneca, Shakespeare, Calderon, Milton, and Buchner.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ENGLISH 115G: Shakespeare: Five Tragedies

Readings of five plays: Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth, and Antony and Cleopatra. We will begin with a brief overview of Shakespeare's life and times and the theatrical conditions he worked within. However, our efforts will be focused primarily on direct engagement with Shakespeare's plays themselves. Sessions will include discussions of Shakespearean tragic language, reading aloud of specific scenes, and exploration of what unites and differentiates these plays. Finally, we will reflect continuously on what makes tragedy such a strange, rich and necessary form, where (as one philosopher wrote) ¿in suffering failure, the loser conquers.¿
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Jenkins, N. (PI)

ENGLISH 118: Literature and the Brain (COMPLIT 138, COMPLIT 238, ENGLISH 218, FRENCH 118, FRENCH 218, PSYC 126, PSYCH 118F)

Recent developments in and neuroscience and experimental psychology have transformed the way we think about the operations of the brain. What can we learn from this about the nature and function of literary texts? Can innovative ways of speaking affect ways of thinking? Do creative metaphors draw on embodied cognition? Can fictions strengthen our "theory of mind" capabilities? What role does mental imagery play in the appreciation of descriptions? Does (weak) modularity help explain the mechanism and purpose of self-reflexivity? Can the distinctions among types of memory shed light on what narrative works have to offer?
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

ENGLISH 118A: Illness in Literature

This class provides an overview of illness narratives in fiction from the 19th century to the present. We will examine how authors use language, plot, and structure to portray illness and even recreate its sensations within the reader. We will also study how domestic arrangements, art, medicine and technology mediate the experience of disease. Our discussion of fiction will be buttressed by theoretical texts about the function (and breakdown) of language when deployed to describe physical and mental suffering. Finally, we will consider the ethics of writing about illness. What does it mean to find beauty in descriptions of pain? What role can literature play in building empathy for experiences we have not (yet) experienced ourselves?
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ENGLISH 122: Medieval Manuscripts, Digital Methodologies (DLCL 122)

Medieval Studies is entering a phase of digital abundance. In the last seven years, more medieval material has been put online than has ever been available for study at any point in the past. How can we engage with the growing mass of digitized material available to us? How does this sudden access impact the work we do, the types of questions we ask, the connections we make, and the audiences we write for?nnIn this course, we will examine and evaluate digital medieval resources and software that has been created for interacting with those resources. Students will have the opportunity to design and create an innovative project based on medieval primary sources held at Stanford, applying current digital methods in the analysis and presentation of those resources.
Last offered: Spring 2019

ENGLISH 122C: Medieval Fantasy Literature

This is a comparative medieval literature course that surveys Anglo-Norman and English romance, English and Norse heroic epic, and Norse and Celtic mythology. What significance and meaning did medieval writers from different times and places see in magic and monsters; what superstitions and beliefs converged in their efforts to represent things ¿from the other side,¿ and what compelled them to do so? We will address such questions by reading the literature against the social, cultural, and religious contexts that shaped medieval life and artistic production. Finally we will turn to the modern era with J. R. R. Tolkien's The Fellowship of the Ring and Kazuo Ishiguro's The Buried Giant, reflecting on how literary medievalism has cultivated the tropes of medieval fantasy to produce works which mediate between an imagined history, sublime fabrication, and contemporary concerns.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Ashton, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 124: The American West (AMSTUD 124A, ARTHIST 152, HISTORY 151, POLISCI 124A)

The American West is characterized by frontier mythology, vast distances, marked aridity, and unique political and economic characteristics. This course integrates several disciplinary perspectives into a comprehensive examination of Western North America: its history, physical geography, climate, literature, art, film, institutions, politics, demography, economy, and continuing policy challenges. Students examine themes fundamental to understanding the region: time, space, water, peoples, and boom and bust cycles.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ENGLISH 124A: Latinx Literature (CHILATST 124A, CSRE 124A)

Terms: Spr | Units: 3
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