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41 - 50 of 294 results for: ENGLISH

ENGLISH 51N: The Sisters: Poetry & Painting (ARTHIST 160N)

Poetry and painting have often been called the "sister arts". Why? Sometimes a poem or a painting stands out to us, asking that we stay with it, that we remember it, although we cannot exactly say why. Poems have a way of making pictures in the mind, and paintings turn "rhymes" amid the people, places, and things they portray. Each is a concentrated world, inviting an exhilarating closeness of response: why does this line come first? Why does the artist include that detail? Who knows but that as we write and talk about these poems and pictures we will be doing what John Keats said a painter does: that is, arriving at a "trembling delicate and snail-horn perception of Beauty." Each week explore the kinship between a different pair of painter and poet and also focuses on a particular problem or method of interpretation. Some of the artist/poet combinations we will consider: Shakespeare and Caravaggio; Jorie Graham and (the photographer) Henri Cartier-Bresson; Alexander Pope and Thomas Gainsborough; William Wordsworth and Caspar David Friedrich; Christina Rossetti and Mary Cassatt; Walt Whitman and Thomas Eakins; Thomas Hardy and Edward Hopper.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ENGLISH 52N: Mixed-Race Politics and Culture (AFRICAAM 52N, POLISCI 29N)

Today, almost one-third of Americans identify with a racial/ethnic minority group, and more than 9 million Americans identify with multiple races. What are the implications of such diversity for American politics and culture? In this course, we approach issues of race from an interdisciplinary perspective, employing research in the social sciences and humanities to assess how race shapes perceptions of identity as well as political behavior in 21st century U.S. We will examine issues surrounding the role of multiculturalism, immigration, acculturation, racial representation and racial prejudice in American society. Topics we will explore include the political and social formation of "race"; racial representation in the media, arts, and popular culture; the rise and decline of the "one-drop rule" and its effect on political and cultural attachments; the politicization of Census categories and the rise of the Multiracial Movement.
Last offered: Winter 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ENGLISH 53N: African American Autobiography (AMSTUD 53N)

Since the publication of slave narratives in the eighteenth century, the genre of autobiography has occupied a unique position in the history of African American literary expression. By studying classic autobiographical narratives by black writers, this course will explore questions about racial inequality and democracy, the individual and society, and writing and freedom, among other topics.

ENGLISH 60N: Living on the Edge: Language and Landscape of the Western Fringes

What does it feel like to live on the edge, facing an expanse between you and the next place? Who has lived on the Western fringes of Britain and America? Who has named, formed, and been inspired by that land? Whose voices are silenced in the (re)making of a place? Shaping the landscape through the words we use or the features we build is as old as recorded time and, in this seminar, we'll investigate how the land is imagined, defined, settled, and delimited throughout history, with particular reference to western Britain and California. We'll focus on specific elements in the landscape Water, Hill, Tree, Stone, and Border looking at a sequence of locations through historical, archaeological, placename, literary, and artistic analyses. Students will produce place-name studies; the depictions of landscape through creative work (poetry, prose, non-fiction, song, or picture) on three fieldtrips; and close readings of literary descriptions of landscape. Among the authors study will be John Muir, John Steinbeck, Edward Thomas, Linda Noel, Dylan Thomas, and Gwyneth Lewis.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ENGLISH 67: Contemporary Chicano & Latino Literature (CHILATST 67)

What does it mean to be Chicano and Latino in the United States today? And, how have U.S. writers portrayed the evolution of a Latino identity as it has changed from the age of the Civil Rights Movement to the age of Twitter? This class provides students with an overview of 20th and 21st century U.S. Latino/a literature by focusing on American authors writing after the 1960s to the present. We will read a range of writers, including Gloria Anzaldúa, Sandra Cisneros, Héctor Tobar, and Junot Díaz, and examine how these authors grapple with the artistic task of representing the different national cultures and histories (Mexican American, Puerto Rican, etc.) that inform the U.S. Latino experience. Throughout the quarter we will explore how these fictional narratives offer insights into the topics of American identity, immigration, assimilation, class status, Women of Color feminism, gender and sexuality. In addition, we will also consider contemporary representations from film and television, ultimately working toward a comprehensive analysis of how literary genres and popular cultural contribute to the meaning of Latinidad in the U.S.
Last offered: Winter 2016

ENGLISH 68N: Mark Twain and American Culture (AMSTUD 68N)

Preference to freshmen. Mark Twain defined the rhythms of our prose and the contours of our moral map. He recognized our extravagant promise and stunning failures, our comic foibles and  tragic flaws. He is viewed as the most American of American authors--and as one of the most universal. How does his work illuminate his society's (and our society's) responses to such issues as race, gender, technology, heredity vs. environment, religion, education, art, imperialism, animal welfare, and what it means to be "American"?
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ENGLISH 70N: Shakespeare Unbound

Unbound from classical poetics, or from any strict adherence to the conventions of comedy, tragedy, and history, Shakespeare made¿and still makes¿the stage come to life. The course will focus on some of the more unsettling productions from the hand of the bard, among them Titus Andronicus, The Taming of the Shrew, Romeo and Juliet, A Midsummer Night's Dream, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, Troilus and Cressida, Coriolanus, Cymbeline, and The Winter's Tale.
Last offered: Spring 2018

ENGLISH 71: Dangerous Ideas (ARTHIST 36, COMPLIT 36A, EALC 36, ETHICSOC 36X, FRENCH 36, HISTORY 3D, MUSIC 36H, PHIL 36, POLISCI 70, SLAVIC 36)

Ideas matter. Concepts such as race, progress, and equality have inspired social movements, shaped political systems, and dramatically influenced the lives of individuals. Others, like gender identity, universal basic income, and historical memory play an important role in contemporary debates in the United States. All of these ideas are contested, and they have a real power to change lives, for better and for worse. In this one-unit class we will examine these dangerous ideas. Each week, a faculty member from a different department in the humanities and arts will explore a concept that has shaped human experience across time and space. Some weeks will have short reading assignments, but you are not required to purchase any materials.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Anderson, R. (PI)

ENGLISH 72N: Serial Storytelling

"TV's Lost Weekends," a recent headline says, referring to the modern habit of binge-watching television shows. Such news stories debate the right way to watch TV. They also echo longstanding arguments about how to read books. This course juxtaposes contemporary television with classic serial novels in order to explore different ways of experiencing longform narratives. How do we read or watch when we're forced to wait before the next episode---or, conversely, given the opportunity to binge?
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ENGLISH 75N: American Short Stories (AMSTUD 75N)

How and why did the short story take root and flourish in an American context? Early works of classic American literature read alongside stories by women and minority writers, stretching from the early nineteenth century to the contemporary period.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
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