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31 - 40 of 294 results for: ENGLISH

ENGLISH 20Q: Making of the Modern Woman: Robots, Aliens, & the Feminine in Science Fiction (FEMGEN 20Q)

What does the genre of science fiction have to say about gender identity? How are women in science fiction represented by themselves and by others? Who are women? What is gender and how is it constructed and performed? What is the relationship between man and machine? Between woman and machine? How is gender represented through narratives of literal alien otherness? What does it mean to be a woman online or in gamer culture? Material will include feminist analysis of gender in popular science fiction literature and visual media from 19th through 21st centuries. Texts range from Mary Shelley's Frankenstein to Alex Garland¿s Ex Machina.nnThis course will be reading and writing intensive but should also offer opportunities for spirited discussion. We will be engaging with sensitive subjects such as race, class, gender, and sexuality. Assignments include weekly short essays, discussion leadership, individual presentations, and a final research paper.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ENGLISH 21Q: Write Like a Poet: From Tradition to Innovation

In this poetry workshop, we will spend the first half of the quarter reading and writing in traditional forms and the second half innovating from those forms. When discussing poetry, what do we mean when we talk about craft? What is prosody and why is it important? What are the relationships between form and content? What does a modern sonnet look like? We will consider how a writer might honor a tradition without being confined by it. The culmination of the course will be a project in which the student invents (and writes in) a form of their own. All interested students are welcome¿beginners and experts alike.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ENGLISH 40N: Theatrical Wonders from Shakespeare to Mozart

What is the secret of theatrical illusion? How does the theater move us to wonder, sympathetic identification, and reflection? How can the theater help society understand and manage social conflict and historical change? We will ask these questions through a close examination--on the page and on the stage--of dramatic masterpieces by Shakespeare and Mozart. We will attend live performances of Gounod¿s opera Romeo and Juliet and of Mozart¿s opera The Marriage of Figaro. No prior knowledge of music or foreign languages is required; neither is prior experience in theatricals.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Hoxby, B. (PI)

ENGLISH 43A: American Indian Mythology, Legend, and Lore (AMSTUD 143M, ENGLISH 143A, NATIVEAM 143A)

(English majors and others taking 5 units, register for 143A.) Readings from American Indian literatures, old and new. Stories, songs, and rituals from the 19th century, including the Navajo Night Chant. Tricksters and trickster stories; war, healing, and hunting songs; Aztec songs from the 16th century. Readings from modern poets and novelists including N. Scott Momaday, Louise Erdrich, and Leslie Marmon Silko, and the classic autobiography, "Black Elk Speaks."
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ENGLISH 44B: Contemporary British Fiction: History, Language, Place (ENGLISH 144B)

How do contemporary British novelists represent dramatic changes in culture, class, demography, generation, economy, gender, race, and national identity following the allied victory in the Second World War (1939-1945)?  Focusing on writers born between 1948 and 1975, we examine the structuring of historical consciousness in novels by Zadie Smith, Ian McEwan, Kazuo Ishiguro, Jeanette Winterson, Hanif Kureishi, Julian Barnes, Ali Smith, and Hilary Mantel.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ENGLISH 48N: The American Songbook and Love Poetry (AMSTUD 48N)

A study of performances (Billie Holiday, Frank Sinatra etc) of songs by classic American composers (Porter, Rogers and Hart, Cohen).
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ENGLISH 50: HUMANITIES HOUSE WORKSHOP

For student-run workshops and research seminars in Ng House / Humanities House. Open to both residents and non-residents. May be repeated for credit. This course code covers several discrete workshops each quarter; sign up for a particular workshop via the Google Form at https://goo.gl/forms/TRU0AogJP3IHyUmr2.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

ENGLISH 50A: Character Development: Writing a Script, Creating Engaging Characters

Seminar with Writer in Residence John Markus (BA English '78); meets for seven sessions over three weeks in February. Students will work one on one and in small groups with this professional writer and Stanford alum. John has written everything from stand-up to critically-acclaimed network and cable television shows to independent films to, most recently, theatrical plays. This seminar is designed for students who would like to produce a piece of work in three weeks and/or to pursue a writing profession.
Last offered: Winter 2019

ENGLISH 50B: A Humanist's Guide to Art, Community, Design, and the Earth

This short, intensive seminar features Humanities Scholar & Artist in Residence Clare Whistler (visiting from England April 15-30) will meet for dialogue, workshop, creation, and improvisation. This workshop will help students to think through methods of humanistic inquiry as ways of integrating meaning and purpose into their lives; it will focus on projects, research, collaborations, walking explorations, and relationships. This course will be of interest to students who would like to maintain humanistic values, make a decent living, find good mentors and collaborators, and create communities that are attentive to their constructed and natural environments. This year's course will center on personal assignments and will focus in particular on the theme of gardens.nnThe course will meet M/W 5-7 PM with optional Friday studio time. The first meeting is Monday, April 15.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

ENGLISH 50Q: Life and Death of Words (CSRE 50Q, FEMGEN 50Q, LINGUIST 50Q, NATIVEAM 50Q)

In this course, we explore the world of words: their creation, evolution, borrowing, change, and death. Words are the key to understanding the culture and ideas of a people, and by tracing the biographies of words we are able to discern how the world was, is, and might be perceived and described. We trace how words are formed, and how they change in pronunciation, spelling, meaning, and usage over time. How does a word get into the dictionary? What do words reveal about status, class, region, and race? How is the language of men and women critiqued differently within our society? How does slang evolve? How do languages become endangered or die, and what is lost when they do? We will visit the Facebook Content Strategy Team and learn more about the role words play in shaping our online experiences. Together, the class will collect Stanford language and redesign the digital dictionary of the future. Trigger Warning: Some of the subject matter of this course is sensitive and may cause offense. Please consider this prior to enrolling in the course.
Last offered: Winter 2017
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