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261 - 270 of 293 results for: ENGLISH

ENGLISH 340A: Crooks, Quacks, and Courtesans: Jacobean City Comedy (ENGLISH 240A, HISTORY 232E, HISTORY 332E)

We will read a series of plays set in or around early modern London, written by playwrights such as Ben Jonson, Thomas Middleton, and John Marston. The course will explore the plays¿ hilarious representations of the London underworld, with its confidence tricksters and naive victims, as well as more serious topics such as social mobility and social relations, economic expansion, disease transmission, and the built environment. Plays studied will include: The Alchemist, Epicene, The Roaring Girl, A Chaste Maid In Cheapside, The Dutch Courtesan.
Last offered: Autumn 2017

ENGLISH 345G: Modeling the Post45 Literary Field: Forms, Frames, Contexts, Themes

Exploration of various post45 literary phenomena with special attention to broader conceptual models in and by which they might be interpreted.
Last offered: Spring 2019

ENGLISH 350: Law and Literature

After its heyday in the 1970s and 1980s, many wondered whether the law and literature movement would retain vitality. Within the last decade there has, however, been an explosion of energy in the field, which has expanded beyond the boundaries of the literary text narrowly conceived and incorporated a range of other genres and humanistic approaches. Several recent or forthcoming books survey the range of emerging scholarship and the potential for new directions within the field.  Using one of these--New Directions in Law and Literature (Oxford, 2017)--as a guide, this course will delve into a variety of topics that law and literature approaches can illuminate. These include, among others, conceptions of sovereignty and non-sovereign collectivities, the construction of the citizen and refugee, competing visions of marriage and its alternatives, law and the rhetorical tradition, and theoretical perspectives on intellectual property. Nearly every session will pair recent scholarship in th more »
After its heyday in the 1970s and 1980s, many wondered whether the law and literature movement would retain vitality. Within the last decade there has, however, been an explosion of energy in the field, which has expanded beyond the boundaries of the literary text narrowly conceived and incorporated a range of other genres and humanistic approaches. Several recent or forthcoming books survey the range of emerging scholarship and the potential for new directions within the field.  Using one of these--New Directions in Law and Literature (Oxford, 2017)--as a guide, this course will delve into a variety of topics that law and literature approaches can illuminate. These include, among others, conceptions of sovereignty and non-sovereign collectivities, the construction of the citizen and refugee, competing visions of marriage and its alternatives, law and the rhetorical tradition, and theoretical perspectives on intellectual property. Nearly every session will pair recent scholarship in the field with a literary or artistic work, ranging from Claudia Rankine's Citizen to Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice. Students taking the course for R credit can take the course for either 3 or 4 units, depending on the paper length.  This class is limited to 22 students, with an effort made to have students from SLS (16 students will be selected by lottery) and six non-law students by consent of instructor.  Elements used in grading:  Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. Cross-listed with the Law School ( LAW 3517).
Last offered: Spring 2019

ENGLISH 350D: Constitutional Theory

(Same as LAW 7014.) The guiding question of this course will be how we should think about the role of the U.S. Constitution in American law and American life. In considering this issue, we will address debates about constitutional interpretation (including both originalism and living constitutionalism), the nature and features of constitutional change within the American context, the role of federalism and the separation of powers in the constitutional scheme, and the nature of American constitutionalism as opposed to English and continental European models. We will tackle these debates in the context of some specific contemporary controversies about the Constitution, including: How do the civil rights movement and other social movements impact our understanding of the Constitution?; Does the Constitution reject a European-style inquisitorial process in favor of an Anglo-American vision of due process?; How important is consensus within the Supreme Court to establishing the legitimacy more »
(Same as LAW 7014.) The guiding question of this course will be how we should think about the role of the U.S. Constitution in American law and American life. In considering this issue, we will address debates about constitutional interpretation (including both originalism and living constitutionalism), the nature and features of constitutional change within the American context, the role of federalism and the separation of powers in the constitutional scheme, and the nature of American constitutionalism as opposed to English and continental European models. We will tackle these debates in the context of some specific contemporary controversies about the Constitution, including: How do the civil rights movement and other social movements impact our understanding of the Constitution?; Does the Constitution reject a European-style inquisitorial process in favor of an Anglo-American vision of due process?; How important is consensus within the Supreme Court to establishing the legitimacy of constitutional meanings?; Why do we have nine Supreme Court justices, and; What is the Constitution, and how much does it include outside of the written document? Throughout we will be contemplating the extent to which our interpretation of the constitution depends on our vision of American democracy and the good society.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Meyler, B. (PI)

ENGLISH 352: Postcolonial Tragedy

This course will survey debates on literary tragedy from a postcolonial perspective. Theories of tragedy from Aristotle, Martha Nussbaum, Judith Butler, the German Idealists and various others will be explored for viewpoints on tragedy that will in their turn be tested against a number of literary texts from the postcolonial literary tradition. Works by the Greeks, Shakespeare, Chinua Achebe, Wole Soyinka, Gabriel Garcia Márquez, Toni Morrison, Jean Rhys, Arundhati Roy, and Tayeb Salih will be explored for a working definition of postcolonial tragedy.nPlease note that knowledge of Shakespearean tragedy will be taken for granted in this class If you are not already acquainted with Shakespeare you are encouraged to familiarise yourself with Hamlet, Macbeth, King Lear, and Othello before taking the class. Frequent references will be made in class to these and other plays. Familiarity with Greek tragedy will also be useful during the first weeks of the course. Attention will be paid especially to Sophocles¿ Oedipus Rex and Philoctetes, Aeschylus's Oresteia, and Euripides¿s Medea.Any kind of familiarity with the Greeks is better than none at all, so please be sure to be at the very least acquainted with their central characters and plotlines.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5

ENGLISH 354: Scalar Reading

The computational study of literature allows us to analyze literature across vastly different scales: from extremely detailed word frequencies, to massive archives of texts. But how does criticism operate at these two extremes? How do new methods of analysis respond to the theories of reading offered by literary criticism? In this class, we will compare the scalar modes of reading that our new methods offer with historical theories of critical reading practices, from hermeneutics, to close reading, and beyond.
Last offered: Winter 2018

ENGLISH 356T: Intro to Psychoanalysis as a Critical Method (TAPS 356T)

Primary reading in Freud, Lacan, Laplanche, Irigaray and Kristeva. Secondary readings in film theory (Mulvey to Silverman), art history (Bryson, Bersani) and poststructuralism (Derrida, Foucault, Butler).
Last offered: Spring 2019

ENGLISH 360E: Futurities

Literary studies has long had a wide array of methods for theorizing the past. In more recent years, scholars have begun to theorize the future with equal energy. But what do we talk about when we talk about the future? Events that might happen, the way the thought of the future affects our actions today, or something more? We will discuss queer futurities, Afrofuturism, ecological futurity, revolutionary futures, reception and the futures of texts, and more.
Last offered: Autumn 2017

ENGLISH 364A: CLR James and American Literature

ntellectual CLR James was an insatiable reader of world literature, but the literature and popular culture of the United States claimed a special place in his imagination. This seminar reads American literature from the mid-nineteenth- (Melville, Whitman) to the late-twentieth centuries (Wright, Morrison, Alice Walker) alongside James¿s literary criticism and political thought. Recent critical and theoretical texts will supplement these primary readings.
Last offered: Autumn 2017

ENGLISH 365: Fictions of Literary Being

In an essay from his book The Flesh of Words, Jacques Rancière refers to the suspensive existence of literature. This seminar will be devoted to an in-depth consideration of the possible meanings of this phrase. At issue for us will be the suspension of the normative assumption that the fundamental difference between a person (the author, the reader) and a fictional character is that the former has being while the latter does not. The syllabus will feature a sub-genre of the novel that disturbs this normative assumption by explicitly staging the collapse of the divide between actual and fictional being, flesh and word, author and character, through an extended representation of the porosity of those categories on every level of the text structural, characterological, and narratological. The result is the development of a metafictional discourse within the fiction itself that narrates a crossing-over of the author's material actuality with the immateriality of character. We'll examine the forms of crossing-over, its particular temporal and spatial conditions, and its ethical consequences and philosophical implications both within and outside the novel.
Last offered: Spring 2016
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